Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'hospital'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • General Discussion & Forum information
    • Forum information
    • Just take a moment & say Hi
    • General Discussion
  • Exploration Forums
    • Military Sites
    • Industrial Locations
    • Hospitals & Asylums
    • Public buildings, Education & Leisure
    • Underground Explores
    • High Places
    • Manors, Mansions & Residential
    • Religious Sites
    • Anything Else
  • Other Forums
    • Video Reports
    • Short Reports
    • Themed Threads

Categories

  • About the Forum
  • Urban Exploring information
  • Photography and camera advice
  • Technical Help

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website URL


Location


Interests

Found 398 results

  1. Afternoon All, Ive finally got around to putting up afew photos from my recent trip to New York, and on my second day there i visited the Ellis Island Immigrant Hospital Heres some info/history, i wont post it all as on the Wiki page, there is alot of history, which you can see here if you wanna see more https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ellis_Island_Immigrant_Hospital The Ellis Island Immigrant Hospital, also known as USPHS Hospital #43, was the United States’ first public health hospital, opened in 1902 and operating as a hospital until 1930. Constructed in phases, the facility encompassed both a general hospital and a separate pavilion style contagious disease hospital. The hospital served as a detention facility for new immigrants who were deemed unfit to enter the United States after their arrival; immigrants would either be released from the hospital to go on to a new life in America or sent back to their home countries. The hospital was one of the largest public health hospitals in United States history and is still viewed today as an extraordinary endeavor in the public health field.[5] The hospital is part of the Statue of Liberty National Monument. While the monument is managed by the National Park Service as part of the National Parks of New York Harbor office, the south side of Ellis Island has been off-limits to the general public since its closing. Efforts to restore the hospital buildings and others on the island are being made by government partner Save Ellis Island. In October 2014, the hospital opened to the public for small-group hard hat tours.[6] The original immigration station on Ellis Island opened January 1, 1892, and processed 700 people that first day. In September of that year, the Hamburg-America steamer S.S. Moravia[7] arrived at quarantine with several confirmed cases of cholera. Every ship arriving in the port of New York was held at quarantine before being cleared to land. Passengers found to have dangerous contagious diseases were taken off ships at quarantine and transferred to the hospital at either Hoffman or Swinburne Island. Twenty-four of Moravia's passengers were ill and twenty-two deaths had occurred during the voyage. Many were children. It was believed that the outbreak occurred due to the ship taking on contaminated water from the Elbe river. The threat of a pandemic caused all shipping traffic to be suspended. The backlog of ships held at quarantine and the lack of adequate medical facilities to handle the volume quickly precipitated the need for a more robust healthcare facility to treat immigrants and merchant marine sailors. Twenty years after opening, the hospital, as well as Ellis Island itself, was in decline due to tightening restrictions on immigration in the United States. In 1930, the hospital closed its doors.[10] After the hospital was closed, the FBI occupied the space as an office through the 1930s. During World War II, disabled American servicemen were sometimes housed on the islands, as well as some German and Italian prisoners of war. After the war, many war brides were detained and sometimes treated on Ellis Island. During the 1940s, the hospitals were utilized to treat Merchant Marine sailors, Coast Guardsmen, and U.S. military personnel. During the postwar period, electroconvulsive therapy was employed as a method to treat mental illnesses. This was preferred over the archaic cold water bath therapy or hydropathy, which could cause hypothermia. In 1954, the islands were officially abandoned by the Coast Guard and declared “excess federal property”. In 1996, the World Monuments Fund listed the hospital as one of the world’s 100 Most Endangered Properties, a warning echoed by the National Trust for Historic Preservation, which put the buildings on the list of “most endangered historical places in the United States.” A study conducted by the New York Landmarks Conservancy estimated that with about $3 million of federal funding, the Ellis Island Immigrant Hospital could be stabilized for the next 15 years. According to the Conservancy, 15 years would allow time to develop a long-term preservation plan You would have noticed some art on the walls in the photos, this was by a French street artist JR awakens history with his ‘Unframed – Ellis Island’ Exhibition. The tour and exhibition provide an immersive visual and sensory experience loaded with historical significance. It is not to be missed! ~ Rachael Silverstein, The Culture Trip The work, which is accessible by guided tour, will remain up “until it decides to disappear.” The Unframed—Ellis Island project aims to bring alive the memory of Ellis Island, the entry point to America for millions of immigrants. Coming from all over the world, leaving their belongings, their family and their past behind them, with the fear that they may be sent back to it, the presence of these people who have shaped the modern American identity can still be felt in the buildings, although abandoned for the past 70 years. This is the opportunity to interpret the stories of these people through art. JR’s exhibit lives in the abandoned Ellis Island Immigrant Hospital, on the south side of the island. Archival photographs of the hospital’s patients and staff were artistically wheat-pasted around the abandoned hospital complex of Ellis Island’s south side, creating haunting scenes that bring the history of these rooms back to life. Thanks for looking DJ
  2. Here's a little selection of some of the more random, less-obvious shots from 10 years of exploring asylums. One shot each from most of the ones I've visited. Thought I'd try and avoid the obvious shots a little. Aston Hall (Nottinghamshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Ward block Bangour Village (West Lothian District Asylum, opened in 1906) Main administration block Barrow (2nd Bristol Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1938) Main corridor Bethel (Charitable public asylum, opened in 1713) Day room Bethlem Royal (4th incarnation of "Bedlam" (founded in 1247), initially for private middle-class patients, opened in 1930) Admin block staircase Cane Hill (3rd Surrey County Asylum, opened in 1883) Chapel altar Carlton Hayes (Leicestershire & Rutland County Asylum, opened in 1904) Chapel Cefn Coed (Swansea Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1932) South-eastern view of ward block and water tower Colney Hatch (aka Friern, 2nd Middlesex County Asylum, later 2nd London County Asylum, opened in 1851) Admin block tower Denbigh (aka North Wales Asylum, opened in 1848) View from ward block window towards admin block clock tower Fairfield (Three Counties Asylum (for Bedfordshire, Hertfordshire & Huntingdonshire), opened in 1860) South east view of main block Fair Mile (Berkshire County Asylum, opened in 1870) South-east view of main block Fulbourn (Cambridgeshire & Ely County Asylum, opened in 1858) Main elevation (admin block in centre) Gartloch (Glasgow District Asylum, opened in 1896) View from dormitory window Glenside (Bristol Borough Asylum, opened in 1861) Chapel window Goodmayes (West Ham Borough Asylum, opened in 1901) Gallery with cell doors Hanwell (Middlesex County Asylum, later first London County Asylum, opened in 1831) Main corridor in female wing Harperbury (Middlesex Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1934) Dormitory Hartwood (Lanarkshire District Asylum, opened in 1895) Jump-proof fire escape Heckingham (former Norwich Union Workhouse, converted into 2nd Norfolk County Mental Hospital, opened in 1927) Main elevation Hellingly (East Sussex County Asylum, opened in 1903) Corridor network (with random portable bathtub) Hensol (Glamorganshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Interview room High Royds (3rd West Riding County Asylum, opened in 1888) Glazed-tile doorway Horton (8th London County Asylum, opened in 1902) Administration block The Lawn (Charitable Public Asylum, opened in 1820) View from eastern wing Lennox Castle (Dunbartonshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1937) Admin block coaching entrance Leybourne Grange (Kent Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1936) OT room Little Plumstead (Norfolk Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Discarded training material Mapperley (Nottingham Borough Asylum, opened in 1880) Southern aspect Middlewood (2nd West Riding County Asylum, opened in 1872) Chapel Napsbury (Middlesex County Asylum, opened in 1905) Recreation hall (left) and ward block (right), with water tower in background Pen-Y-Fal (Monmouthshire County Asylum, opened in 1851) Ward blocks Pool Parc (Overspill annexe to North Wales Mental Hospital, opened in 1937) Main corridor Rauceby (Kesteven County Asylum, opened in 1902) Administration block Rosslynlee (East Lothian & Peebles District Asylum, opened in 1874) Recreation hall Runwell (East Ham & Southend-on-Sea Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1937) Chapel Severalls (2nd Essex County Asylum, opened in 1913) Gallery with cell doors St Andrew's (Norfolk County Asylum, opened in 1814) Mortuary St Brigid's (Connaught District Asylum, opened in 1833) Ward corridor St Cadoc's (Newport Borough Asylum, opened in 1906) Window in day-room. St Clement's (Ipswich Borough Asylum, opened in 1870) "Quiet room" in medium-secure annexe St Crispin (Northamptonshire County Asylum, opened in 1876) Staircase in Superintendent's residence St David's (Joint Counties Asylum for Carmarthenshire, Pembrokeshire & Cardiganshire, opened 1865) Observation room in annexe St George's (Northumberland County Asylum, opened in 1859) Corridor network St John's (Lincolnshire County Asylum, opened in 1852) Admin block main reception St Mary's (Gateshead Borough Asylum, opened in 1914) Corridor network Stone House (The City Of London Asylum, opened in 1866) Dining hall Strathmartin (aka Balvodan) (Charitable Public Idiot Asylum, opened in 1855) Eastern side of main building Sunnyside Royal (Montrose District Asylum, opened in 1858) Congregation area outside recreation hall Talgarth (Joint Breconshire and Radnorshire County Asylum, aka Mid-Wales Asylum, opened in 1903) View from ward window The Towers (Leicester Borough Asylum, opened in 1869) Main corridor in ward section of eastern block West Park (11th London County Asylum, opened in 1915 as Canadian War Hospital, reopened in 1923 as mental hospital) Geriatric ward day room Whittingham (4th Lancashire County Asylum, opened in 1873) Entrance into ward block from corridor network
  3. Red Cross Hospital History Before it's closure at some point during the 1980's, it served as a children's hospital. It was thought to have been founded around the turn of the 20th century. The hospital was owned and managed by the charity 'Red Cross Italy' which becomes apparent from the rather large red cross on the ceiling of the chapel. The building itself resides near the edge of the mountain, roughly about 1100 metres above sea level which was a common practice for medical facilities Italy. It was believed that the air was fresher up in the mountains, more therapeutic and held medicinal properties, which was beneficial for the treatment of the patients. Our Visit Visited with @aWorldinRuins and @Ninja Kitten on a recent trip to Italy. This was the first stop on the tour and a revisit for myself. I was glad to go back, it's a very beautiful and photogenic location, in my opinion. I loved seeing all the beds, the chapel and the little classrooms again. As always, hope you enjoy my report! If you've got this far, thanks for reading
  4. After the Brownsville General Hospital relocated to its new location in 1965, the former buildings were converted into the Golden Age Nursing Home. Due to the normally full capacity of the Brownsville General Hospital, the hospital relocated. Shortly after its closing, The Horner Nursing Home/Golden Age Nursing Home was made/built in 1929 and closed in 1985 due to reports of horrible conditions and treatment of its patients. The nursing home was a residence for some of the nurses who worked at the hospital. It later became a care facility for the elderly. *Please take note of the sentences shown at the bottom of the video during scenes.* Location: Brownsville, PA Urban Exploration Paranormal Investigations ParaUrbex
  5. The Brownsville General Hospital opened in 1914 but wasn't completed until 1916, and closed in 1965. The hospital was always at full capacity and thus, an addition was made to create a third level over the central section of the building and raised the hospital’s capacity to 100 beds. Due to the capacity, the hospital was then relocated. Shortly after the closing of the hospital, The Horner Nursing Home/Golden Age Nursing Home was made/built in 1929 and closed in 1985 due to reports of horrible conditions and treatment. *Please take note of the sentences shown at the bottom of the video during scenes.* Location: Brownsville, PA Urban Exploration Paranormal Investigations ParaUrbex
  6. I remember this being a real nice explore except for loads of pigeon shite everywhere
  7. On the outskirts of Fishburn lies the derelict Winterton hospital. Winterton hospital used to be very big however most of its buildings were demolished and this part is the only building that remains of it. All of the windows are boarded up however when we got there it looked like someone had pulled the entire doorway off causing the whole thing to open making an entry so easy. Inside the building is in terrible condition, (similar to St. peter's) with collapsed floors, wallpaper peeling, water damage etc. We also didn't realise at the time that the building had asbestos but luckily we had masks so make sure to bring one if you're planning on going inside. We were unable to access the top floor due to the floor being so bad so we only got photos from the corridor as we came up the stairs. That all being said, winterton hospital does have a lot of history and it is a shame to see it left in such a poor state.
  8. A few photos from an exploring roadtrip of Essex and Kent with Mookster and our American explorer friend from back in April. Another backlog, and another one where I managed to set my camera to JPEG. DOHHH!!!! We clambered through some undergrowth and spent about 45 minutes inside. We were in one of the large corridors and heard barking. We absolutely pegged it down the corridor; I'm carrying quite a lot of extra weight so there was no chance to sneak into a side room for 10 mins. We heard the inevitable "OI!" from about 300 yards down the corridor, we'd been seen. I don't believe in running when actually caught; so we turned back and walked up to the security and explained ourselves. He asked us how we got in, marched us to the gate and let us go onto the road right by my car. result! I think our American friend was pleasantly suprised by how easy it went down. - St George's Hospital is a disused hospital situated on Suttons Lane in Hornchurch in the London Borough of Havering, in North East London. It opened its doors in 1939 as "Suttons Institution" and was used during World War II to house airmen from the nearby RAF Hornchurch. In 1948 during its advent into the NHS; it was renamed St George's. The site has remained empty since 2012 and the vacant site has since been transferred into the ownership of NHS Property Services when the company was formed in April 2013. There are plans are in place for a new health centre on site, with the remaining land being converted to housing; Quelle Supríse! #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157693679140750
  9. Unfortunatly the Glen o dee hospital was pretty trashed , a few nice little bits
  10. The hospital was closed less than three years ago. The facility has functioned, among others orthopedics and traumatology, rheumatology, pulmonology and surgery. The total area of the facility is about 2.38 ha. As of today, little souvenirs remain in the middle. The only thing left was the lamps in the operating rooms and some glass equipment somewhere in the attic. Despite everything, the hospital has an amazing atmosphere ... until you want to walk the long corridors. The hospital is not haunted, it has no ghosts ... it is guarded ... motion detectors, cameras and a dog make the entrance into the wild border with a miracle. Thanks to this the building is in very good condition .... (Sorry, translator)
  11. Hey everyone, so I'm pretty sure everyone's heard of this place so i dont really need to explain much about it, but if you haven't, below is a brief history of Denbigh Mental Asylum. Grade 2 Listed building. Built work started in 1844 Building work completed in 1848 Built to house up to 200 patients with psychiatric illnesses. In the early 1900's it housed 1537 patients (Approx). The hospital had its own farm and gas works. Planned for closure by Enoch Powellin the 1960's, however it only began closing in sections between 1991-1995. Nurses Quarters: This is genuinely one of the best condition buildings that i have ever explored. Most of the lower floor windows were covered in either ivy or thick vines, so it got quite dark in some sections of the building. Now for the hospital itself, my personal favorite photos: Thanks for reading, Make sure to check out my youtube channel Jake Alan Craig for the video and my instagram @exploring_with_jake for regular abandoned photos. #WereJustTrespassing
  12. One of my favorite hospitals...the Kirkbride. This example of one was built in 1858 and had unfortunately some rather hideous modification done over the years mainly in the admin section. I contacted the state archives where this building is located after I visited my second time asking if they had any old photos of the interiors and sadly they did not. I also asked for any information they had which turned out to be very little. They did direct me to a small group of students from college that did some research and gave presentation a few years ago as well as some PDF files of what they did have in their collection. The "chapel" or amusement hall looks like it was really beautiful originally and from what I can discern they made it into 2.5 floors from the original open space it once was. There is a really decorative stenciling in the "attic" portion which should have been seen from what is now the first floor along with pretty stained glass windows which again are "cut" up due to the floor addition. Admin has some ghastly suspended ceilings with piping all over. The front entry was covered up partially and made smaller as well from what I can tell. Why they did such hideous things I do not know. Lack of common sense or wanting to preserve the originality of the building. There really isn't much information about this place as I mentioned but I do know in the 1930's they changed the wards to mainly open ones hence really no patient rooms. There were also several other buildings that have been torn down over the years which were quite nice and some modifications done to the outside of the kirk which I found out about when I found an old postcard view of it. Anyway here's the photos from my various 4 visits. It's 11 hrs from me or I'd gone more than that
  13. Found a few more of St.Ebbas, nice to see these again, lots peeling paint and random bricks coming through doors lol:- Enjoy Just found this pic and I luv it lol:-
  14. Had a look at this place on a recent trip to Scotland. Very decayed and stripped this one but never the less still a nice spot for a look around. There was some lovely tiles still in place in parts of the hospital which I liked. I do like a bit of old tile work There was a lot of kids toys dotted about also which seemed strange and out of place. We almost bumped into a couple of people who turned up while we where there but, they must have heard us inside and ran off. Maybe they had mistaken our low talking for the rustle of feathers A nice relaxed explore this, for us anyway, on a nice sunny afternoon. Visited with non member Paul. Thanks for Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157694792372572/with/41878484015/
  15. History In 1781 the town of Montrose was unique among Scottish towns and cities in being the first to have an asylum for the insane. The Montrose Lunatic Asylum, Infirmary and Dispensary was completed after the institution of a subscription by local woman Mrs Susan Carnegie of Charleton, following concerns about "mad people being kept in a prison in the middle of the street". It was described as "a house and garden in the links of Montrose". It occupied the site now bounded by Barrack Road, Ferry Road and Garrison Road, approximately where the Marine Hotel and the Fire Station now stand. During these years, the main preoccupation of the managers was the considerable overcrowding in the Asylum, which among other things, made containing the not infrequent outbreaks of such diseases as cholera and smallpox very difficult. By 1853, the number of residents passed the 200 mark. As before, various additions and alterations were made to the buildings, but at one stage, even the Medical Superintendent's house on its completion was pressed into service as patient accommodation before the Superintendent could move in! Thus, inevitably, a committee was appointed in 1855 to look into the question of acquiring a site for a new Asylum, and finally decided on the lands of the farm of Sunnyside, outside the town. In 1858, Dr. James Howden was appointed Superintendent and was to remain in this post for the next 40 years. The first patients were received in the new Asylum during that year, and within two years, "the greater part of the patients were moved" to it. Inevitably, with the increased availability of accommodation, the stringent requirements for admission exercised at the old Asylum were relaxed, and in a single year (1860) the numbers rose by 30% to 373. Carnegie house, for private patients opened in 1899. A brochure describing its attractions and a brief history of the Hospital was commissioned by the Managers to mark the occasion, and was written by Mr. James Ross. A copy can be seen in Montrose Public Library. Ravenswood was now given up, but Carnegie House did not solve the continuing problems of overcrowding. Numbers reached 670 by 1900, and two "detached villas" were built in quick succession, Howden Villa being completed in 1901 and Northesk Villa in 1904. With the crisis in Europe in 1938, arrangements were made for gas proofing and sandbagging basement windows. One hundred yards of trench, 6 feet deep were dug in the field opposite the main gate. A.R.P. training was started, fire fighting appartus was overhauled, and gas masks issued. All this effort was not wasted. On the 2nd of October, 1940, five high explosive bombs fell on the Hospital. One missed the Main Building by 12 feet, breaking glass, but causing no casualties. Another hit the kitchen area of Northesk Villa, injuring two nurses. One of them, Nurse Reid, although injured herself, managed to attend to her colleague, Nurse Simpson, and then "proceeded to comfort and calm her patients". Her devotion to duty was such that Nurse Reid was recommended for a decoration, and was awarded the George Medal, the first in Scotland. As in the previous war, patients were evacuated from other Hospitals which were required by the War Office, and Montrose had once again to accommodate as many as 220 additional patients and their staff from Stirling. At a later stage, patients from Aberdeen were also accommodated, due to bomb damage at Aberdeen Asylum. The number of resident patients thus topped one thousand for the first and only time, (1052 on 12th June, 1940). Over the 30 year period from post-war to the bi-centenary, it would not be too much of an exaggeration to say that the hospital had changed as much as it did in the previous hundred. Television was introduced in time for the Coronation in 1953, and most wards had a set by 1957. Complete modernisation of most wards was carried out during the 50's and 60's, which transformed especially the Main Building wards. Open fires gave way to radiators and many side rooms were heated for the first time. The site officially closed in 2011. The explore Yet another site long overdue, so with a few clear days it was time to make the long journey north. After a few years of average asylums, Sunnyside was a very pleasant way to spend an afternoon with the North Sea winds at ease! With soil samples being taken in the grounds, hopefully the site has a future; which wont be helped by a group of kids i encountered later in the day. I cringe at the thought that one fire could bring 230 years of history to an end... 1. 2. Waiting for the tourist bus... 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Doctor's changing room. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14, 15. 16, 17. 18, 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. One from the modern(ish) villa, probably 1930's built. 24. Basement view of the main building with day room and 'cells' beyond, long used for storage. 25. 26. Infirmary. 27. Interesting club house with maintenance shed attached. Note the tree timbers supporting the porch. Thanks for looking folks!
  16. The Victoria Infirmary in Glasgow is due to shut this year due to the opening of the new Southern General Hospital. I was wondering if anyone knew how it takes them to fully secca these places up, and if I'd have a chance to get a wee mooch around?
  17. has any heard of a underground hospital in dover??? any information on it would be good Thanks everyone!
  18. Walkergate Hospital in Newcastle opened in the 1880's, it was originally a hospital for infectious diseases. During the First World War injured soldiers who were sent home were temporarily housed in the two pavilions at the east end of the site, these were demolished in 1979. In the Second World War the hospital fell victim to bombing. In more recent years the hospital had an ENT department, x-ray and a small theatre.. Various parts of the hospital closed over the years, with the announcement that the final two wards, that provided longer term palliative care for patients with chronic conditions and shorter term respite care, would close during the summer of 2011. The demo was already well underway when we visited. On with some pics Externals Internals
  19. A large hospital,build in the 60's and will be demolished soon. It was one of the hospitals where they also removed the lamps and tables in the OK room. But still a nice location for a Saturday with a nice staircase. More can be found on my flickr page. http:// https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums
  20. Found this place by comparing a vague YouTube video and some info I've found here and there, then confirmed with Google maps satellite. Place was pretty big, but unfortunately pretty destroyed by vandals over time. Here are some pictures I took on my scouting trip there. Will go back for more/better shots.
  21. Hi everyone! This is my footage of Battle Hospital in Reading. I visited in May 2018 and the explore went extremely well as we managed to search the entire site without any interruptions and oh my what a place to explore! A Little History The site was created in 1867 as a Workhouse which went on to be known as the Reading Union Workhouse. They added an infirmary to the site between the years of 1889 and 1892 which added the space for an extra 185 beds! Amongst the First World War it was then known as the Reading War Hospital. It was then in 1930 that it became Battle Hospital but it's not over quite yet as in 1952 they built a new maternity unit which was known as Thames Block and then in 1972 they built a new block called Abbey block so by 1993 Battle Hospital was able to accomodate 280 beds however this was not great compared to the 760 beds at Reading's other hospital, the Royal Berkshire Hospital. It was then in 2005 that Battle Hospital closed it's doors for the final time with all the patients being transferred over to the Royal Berkshire hospital in a new block which would be known as Battle block. Thanks for reading! Hopefully you found something of interest
  22. Red Morgue Hospital History I couldn't find huge amount history on this location but from what I've gathered the hospital was built at some point in the early 20th century. It was funded by investors and at a time when nursing care was predominately carried out by the clergy. They wanted the hospital to become more secular in order to distance themselves from the church. The hospital was mainly used for surgery and featured several operating theatres but later on a maternity ward and outpatient clinic was introduced. About 90 years later the orginal hospital building was combined with a larger nearby hospital. The Red Morgue hospital was eventually closed around 2013. By this time it was only used to see outpatients, as most of it's services were provided by the new hospital which was more modern and sophisticated. Visit Visited with @darbians on a weekend trip to Belgium. I was really keen to see this one after finding out about it and seeing a few photographs. It was great to see an old hospital in fairly good condition with some items still left, combined with a nice bit of decay. As always, hope you enjoy my photos ? (Spot the rookie error ?) If you've got this far, thanks for reading!
  23. I've visited this former state hospital site a few times and over the last few years they've torn down a few buildings and unfortunately before I was able to make my first visit the morgue and lab were two of those :(. I wished I'd gotten to see them but alas...I did not. Here are a few photos from various trips. I didn't take great photos when I first started exploring and my editing sucked! Most of the buildings are rather boring and not much was left inside. One of the areas of this complex was/is a bowling alley which for years was flooded and no one was able to photograph it. However when they were preparing a building beside it to be demoed the water was removed from it. It's completely dark there so no available light except by light painting which I detest This building above they removed the cupolas for what reason I don't know and they are sitting behind fence at the building in the background This building was demoed 2016.
  24. St Josephs Orphanage / Mount Street Hospital Even though this location has already been done by every man and his dog, I decided to chuck a quick report up anyway. As stated above in the title of my report, this one features photographs taken mostly on the first visit and one taken on another which will become clear towards the end. History St Joseph's Orphanage was designed by architect R.W Hughes in the style of gothic architecture, which was typical of that particular era. The construction work was endowed by Maria Holland, a wealthy widow, who contributed a sum of 10,000 to achieve this. She wanted to care for the sick, at a time when Preston had the highest mortality rate in the UK. This was predominately due to inadequate housing and the poor working conditions in the local mills and factories. The orphanage was first officially opened in the September of 1872 and five years later it became St Joseph's Institute for the Sick & Poor. The hospital accommodated for around 25 patients and was run by the Sisters of Charity of Our Lady Mother of Mercy. Voluntary contributions funded the maintenance and general upkeep of the hospital and it was also the first provider of welfare to Roman Catholic girls in Preston. In 1910 the hospital was granted its first operating theatre, as well as the chapel being built that same year. By 1933 a new wing was added and another in 1958 which was officiated by Princess Marina, the Duchess of Kent. During both world wars it served as a military hospital to treat wounded British and Dutch soldiers. One of St Joe's most famous patients was performer George Formby who died of a heart attack at the hospital in 1961. The hospital eventually closed its doors in 1982. It was then bought by its current owner who converted it into a care home until 2003. A year later in 2004, plans were proposed to convert the building into 82 flats with a grant of £2m but the redevelopement never seemed to happen. Presently 3 sections of the site are still classified as grade II listed and the building was recently featured on the Victorian Society's 'top most at risk historic buildings in the UK.' Visit Visited with @scrappy. This one has been on my to do list since I really started exploring but I never got round to doing it until recently. Despite being pretty fucked from years of neglect, local kids, general arseholes etc, I did still quite enjoy seeing this one finally. The main purpose of my visit was photographing a newly discovered section which certainly didn't disappoint, as well as the operating lights being rather pretty too (so glad no one has smashed those up yet.) All in all still a fairly nice location and worth popping by if you're in the area. As always, hope you enjoy my report! Started tidying up my photos of the chapel and went a little overboard... (Obligatory hospital wheelchair photo...) Now onto the best part Once we found out all the doors had been mysteriously removed we decided to go back again for more photos. If you've got this far, thanks for reading!
  25. I first visited this former mental hospital back in June 2012 and alot has changed since that time ...some good some bad. This hospital started it's life in the 1920's and closed in 1994. At it's largest capacity it had 5,818 patients. Like many other state hospitals in the U.S it had it's own farm , laundry, bakery, refrigeration plants etc and various other buildings were built in later years such as a chapel and larger separate hospital built in 1966 for infirm patients which had, an operating room, laboratory, diagnostic equipment, clinics, medical library and mortuary. When I first visited here it was overgrown with poison ivy, tall grass....just unkempt and relatively easy as no one seemed to be watching it. There were plans to convert it to senior housing but that never happened and in 2013/2014 a group bought it to convert it into a college. I had planned to visit about that time when a friend who visited said they'd already taken out the morgue contents of the larger building. He also said they'd oddly started fixing up the auditorium but other things left untouched. He also discovered had started doing illegal abatement and word got out and they were shut down. It still sits partially abated which gives a new look to what I'd seen before but it also took away some of the charm. I of course wanted to see the big morgue when I went back...whenever that was I wasn't sure. Well last summer I was able to get back and the place is much trickier to do since there's a damn security guy 24/7 who seems to make usual rounds. All the doors have been screwed shut with the exception of a few....of course way out in the wide open. We got there very early in the morning so I took a few night shots. I might add the old morgue thankfully is still there in the older hospital building although all the doors have been taken. I would like to add that this place is sheer hell due to the tunnels which I didn't need to use in 2012 (since we were able to freely walk around) and is most known because of these horrific tunnels LOL. You basically are crouched in some while going down or up very steeply (depending on how you enter the campus) and are narrow as well as filled with the white crap (most likely asbestos) from the pipes that have fallen on the floor. I did not enjoy them at all and we actually left earlier than I wanted because we were both exhausted from carrying the heavy backpacks and navigating the tunnels trying to find a new way out so we didn't go back up the tunnels. I plan to go back though and get pics of things we missed. So here are some pics from my early visit which are crap. I can't re-edit them due to losing them via the cat who knocked the external HD to the floor a couple years ago. I was not a good photographer of buildings back then as I came from nature so this "architecture" was a whole new game for me. I struggled a bit with composition and lighting.....and used a fisheye at times Unfortunately I don't have the same pics of old trip of auditorium to compare with how it is now. I never edited and uploaded the old ones Forgot to add I stopped by in the winter last year to take a few exteriors hence the snow pics
×