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  1. Back in July en-route to the 28DL Bristol meet, Mookster and myself explored this disused D H L TradeTeam beer storage warehouse in Gloucestershire. The day was a mixture of fails and successes and while this one looked pretty solidly sealed from the outside, at the back there has clearly been people living inside/exiting and entering the building. There was an alarm sounding within the building; not sure how long it had been going on for; but it was pretty boring and plain, so we did some handheld photos and left. There is little info on it; but it belonged to Interbrew before the last company and has been closed since 2017. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157672156943007/with/45209179111/
  2. Back in July, myself and @mookster revisited a site which we both explored back in May 2010 where we piloted my beloved 1978 Land Rover Series III to leafy Surrey. It was a roasting hot day and as an explorer of a year and a bit, it was an exciting huge factory explore which we spent hours in. Fast forward well over eight years and we decide to try a few sites around Surrey and London and head here for a revisit. A lot had happened here in eight years; all documented on crappy YouTube videos and various visits over the year, the site had been torn apart, once secured with guards, fences erected and just pillaged for its innards. I'd heard about being a muddy swamp inside in the rain; hardly suprising as it was a cat litter factory producing cat litter mined from Fullers Earth from a quarry on the same site. We arrived on site in a similarly ancient car; my 1988 Volvo 240 GLT on a much hotter day; quite a roasting day. Perfect exploring weather. The years had not been good; it was battered, beaten and stripped beyond recognition; not suprising seeing as it shut in 1994. I did not recognise this place at all. But it kind of had a charm in the summer sun, it looked like the sort of factory you'd explore on GTA Free Roam, or Driver and find Tommy Vermicelli hiding!! Good to see it again for nostalgia in any case. We spent an hour ish here before moving on to London where we ended up sitting in traffic for ages and going to a very tasty place which served bowls of meat gravy with a burger to bathe in it. Very good it was too! #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21 #22 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157673570696148
  3. Built in 1808. Tucked away in the corner of a public garden and in need of repair Apart from a grumpy old boy telling me im not supposed to be here it was a nice little place thanks for looking
  4. Visited with @The_Raw, @Pinkman, @Maniac and @extreme_ironing. History The Brent oil field, off the north-east coast of Scotland is one of the largest fields in the North Sea. Discovered in 1971, it was one of the most significant oil and gas finds made in the UK sector. Brent field production peaked in 1982 when over half a million barrels of oil and 26 million cubic meters of gas were produced… every day! The Brent oil field was served by four large platforms owned by Shell – Alpha, Bravo, Charlie and Delta. Each platform has a ‘topside’ which is visible above the waterline and houses the accommodation block, helipad, as well as drilling and other operational areas. The topsides sit on much taller supporting structures, or ‘legs’, which stand in 140 metres of water and serve to anchor the topsides to the sea bed. By 1976 Brent Bravo had started production, and later that year the second platform, Brent Delta was installed, which started production in 1977. Delta weighed 24,000 tonnes (the same as 2,000 London busses!) and the platform alone was as tall as the London Eye. The Brent field has reached the stage where production is no longer economically viable and decommissioning is underway. In 2011 Brent Delta stopped production. After 5 years of planning and 2 years of preparations, the entire Brent Delta platform was cut free from its supporting legs and brought ashore in one piece, where it will be dismantled and scrapped. Brent Delta Platform after being brought ashore in Hartlepool On the helipad View across the deck with the derrick and flare stack towering above More detailed view of the topdeck, where drilling activities were carried out View across the deck View in the other direction towards the crane Derrick and flare stack On the top deck where the drilling happened Hook and winch equipment The “doghouse” where drilling operations were controlled Heading below deck we find a workshop And various plant rooms There were various rooms for deployment of workers Sick bay The workers accommodation was pretty basic Central control room The engine room was tucked away below the accommodation block One of the emergency lifeboats Sign on the side of the platform
  5. At first glance this old school looks to be about the most trashed location you have ever seen, the mostly glazed front has had almost every single window smashed and almost all the ceiling tiles have been pulled down leaving a huge mess of glass and tile debris all over the floors and outside, but it's what's inside that counts here. At one stage it was a nursing school but at some point after closure pretty much the entire building has been taken over and systematically had some seriously incredible murals painted in many of the rooms and corridors by a duo of Belgian graffiti artists, Pete and Mata. The most impressive selection of graffiti I have seen, the only place that comes close to this is Doel also in Belgium but this takes it to another level. If you're a fan of skilled graffiti, this is one place you need to check out. It's difficult to pick out a decent amount of photos so I'll just go with my favourites. Loads more photos here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157645988379316/
  6. History This Octel site in Amlwch was chosen in 1949 to collect bromine from the sea, it was picked by H Fossett and R O Gibson because of the strong tidal flow, the depth of the sea in the area and gulf stream sea temperatures. The plant was built and finished construction in 1952, ready to start collecting the bromine out of the sea. The site was officially owned by Octel until 1989 when the production of bromine chemicals became more important which resulted in Great Lakes purchasing the site due to them specialising in bromine chemistry. In 1995, one of the BOT2’s that was used for collecting bromine chemicals was badly damaged by a fire that occurred on the site. Two of the 30-metre towers were destroyed and around 5 people were injured. Octel bromine works started their operations in 1952 and closed in 2004. Canatxx purchased the site and announced plans to turn the site into a liquid natural gas storage site. Our Visit This is one site that we have kept our eye on for a while, but never got around to visiting. Finally, we decided to pay the site a little visit and we were not disappointed with what it had to offer. We made sure to visit on a sunny, bright day so we could spend as much time as we needed to explore the whole site. It took us a good few hours to explore the whole site but was definitely worth the time and drive there.
  7. Methodist hall Methodist central halls were grand buildings that used to attract thousands of people when the temperance movement was at its strongest. The temperance movement is a social movement against the consumption of alcoholic beverages. Participants in the movement typically criticize alcohol intoxication or promote complete abstinence (teetotalism), leaders emphasizing the sinfulness of drinking as well as the evil effects on personality, family life. Ironically over the years many have been sold off, with some now used as bars and nightclubs. The Methodist Central Hall, Located in Corporation Street, Birmingham, England, is a three storey red brick and terracotta Grade II* listed building with a distinctive tower at the northern end of Corporation Street, opposite the Victoria Law Courts. It is located within the Steelhouse Conservation Area. The terracotta was manufactured by the renowned firm of Gibbs and Canning Limited of Tamworth, which also produced decorative works for 179-203 Corporation Street and the interior of the Victoria Law Courts in Birmingham along with the Natural History Museum in London. The street level has twelve bays of shops (four with their original fronts). The building also runs along Ryder Street and has more original shop fronts. It was built 1903-4 by architects Ewan Harper & James A. Harper at a cost of £96,165. Its main hall seats 2,000 and it has over thirty other rooms including three school halls. In 1991, the Methodist Church was converted into a nightclub; however, this venture closed in 2002. The hall was re-opened on 14 September 2007 as the 'Que club.' The opening night was hosted by 'Drop Beats Not Bombs'. On re-opening the club has seen extensive repairs and improvements to its decor, and regularly hosted events such as Atomic Jam and Fantasia. The site has remained empty since 2016 and has fallen into a state of disrepair in recent years and has had vegetation growing out of the upper floors, prompting Historic England to add it to its 'Heritage at Risk’ register. The building has been the subject of proposals to be converted into an office building. The first of such was submitted in 2001, only to be withdrawn. Planning applications to convert the building into apartments have also been rejected by Birmingham City Council on the basis that original internal features would be destroyed. However, the council has since given planning consent to a proposal to convert the building into apartments. It is to be referred to the Local Government Office. In 2017 it was reported that the Methodists Central hall is set to be transformed into a new £35 million hotel and leisure quarter with a rooftop bar and restaurant. London-based property investor Ciel Capital has unveiled plans to transform the Grade II*-listed Methodist Central Hall into a leisure complex with a hotel, apart-hotel and a mix of retail and food units. DSC_3288 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3289 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3290 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3269 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3267 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3270 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3272 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3277 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3278 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3279 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3280 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3281 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3284 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3287 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3258 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3261 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3282 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  8. The history A two-storey mill built in 1831 which resides two miles west of the town centre of Huddersfield. The Financial Reporting Council (FCR) of 1834 shows Armitage Bros already established here. The family name 'Armitage' pre-dates the 14th century, but it was Joseph Armitage (1778-1860) who significantly increased the family fortune and moved decisively into the gentry class. In 1822 he built the first woollen manufacturing mill at Milnsbridge, by the 1840's he handed over control of the business to his sons, who reconstituted it as a partnership called Armitage Bros, which survived until it became a limited company. By 1914 it was part of John Crowther's group. In the late 19th century John Crowther and his two sons moved from Marsden down the Clone Valley to Milnsbridge after purchasing two mills, where they began the successful production of woollen cloth. Crowther took his own life in 1931 and its thought that the death of his wife and the great depression were cumulative in this. Today parts of the mill are rented to a few small business, elsewhere derelict. The explore It's not often where in this neck of the woods... but when we are we always take a trip down Factory Lane. We've attempted this a few times... gates drawn, security breathing down our necks or locals asking us our intentions... seems if your walking round an abandoned building your the local scrap man even though your donning DSLR cameras. Anyway... been one of Crowther's we knew we were in for a treat. so.. sitting waiting.. waiting a bit more... we were in. The sheer size, the beautiful architecture, the remains of the mid century furniture... thank f*uck we drove down for a look. It looks like some of the mill buildings have been demolished at some point... but even so this place is huge!!! On entrance we were presented by a grand entrance hall which led into various areas of the mill... Of note was the sheer amount of mid- century furniture scattered around the mill... an entire floor decked with Parkay flooring... and a rather odd looking exercise bike that reminded us of a SinclairsC-5... we even came across a quad bike dumped in one of the corners of the mill. We loved it hear... its full of little gems hidden here and there we spent quite some time at the old mill as where not sure if we will be able to access this again... Some pics lbe
  9. As usual with our explores, they are never really a walk in the park. Access to the building itself was a challenge as the top area in which we needed to go was locked off completely. Thankfully, being quite adapted to the tasks at hand, we managed to ride on top of a lift to gain access to the building. Once inside it was clear that the building was in quite a bad state. Natural erosion has started eating away at the 60 year old building, and rust can be found throughout. Pigeons were lurking in the crevices and the whole place smelt of damp. The building was a former office block but has been abandoned for 20 or more years. Here is some of the best photos we managed to get. Thanks for looking! C P.S - Check out our channel! https://www.youtube.com/user/Kirbsvids
  10. I know this place has been done many times before but it is right up my alley and was a tantalizing temptation whilst the rest of the family slept/swam in the villa pool. Thanks for the tip from a fellow member here. The last report/intel from here was 2014 so it has been a while. Things have changed security wise. The holes are patched up and there are 2 new heras style fences inside the main boundary. The main problem with these was that the point of tackling them was very exposed to the street and adjacent dock. Inside, not much has changed. The 'slot window' access point was amusing, the width being about an inch narrower than my back to chest distance and the height being about 4inches shorter than my groin to shoulder height. It took some contorting, and at one point I thought I was well and truly stuck, but in the end, I managed-I was too close to give up. 6am start meant it was a bit dark for photography. By the time I got out, the families were on their balconies and I yelled Ola to them as I jumped over the 4th and final barrier to safety. It was constructed in 1958 according to a design by the Spanish architect Ramón Vázquez Molezún. Running gear and T/G were provided by Metropolitan Vickers. In 1986 The Spanish government commissioned a new Powerplant around 10km away on the other side of the bay. The plant was closed in 1991/2. The 2 rooms I really came for-
  11. Hi all! Just a quick one this time, we decided to visit an old abandoned boatyard which also had an old car place inside as well. We couldn't find to much history on this one however it was nicely buried away in some trees/bushes along the side of the South Coast. Hope you enjoy the footage!
  12. Being a regular at the Nurburgring and this place being brought to my attention by a non explorer, the perfect opportunity after a day of storms arose! Putting this one off all week with temperatures reaching the 30s, the moment came on a somewhat stormy day to check this place out, taking full advantage of the slightly cooler – yet humid air. My first explore out of the UK too which made for something special, despite being a derp it was still something different and unique for myself in comparison to the UK. There’s not much left of the place and the history is scarce, however it looks as though work began rebuilding the place but the cost of development was a spanner in the works. The basement also contained a septic tank which is no longer allowed in the region, combining that with the nearest sewer being some distance away making development even more expensive.
  13. Some pics from this once excellent, now demolished morgue that was part of the Harold Wood Hospital in Essex. Not too many locations like this in the UK at present, few and far between! Visited in July 2011.
  14. Peppermint Powerplant I've seen this particular location a few times before online but I decided to post up a report on it anyway because I think it's quite special with some unique characteristics. History The Peppermint Powerplant was built in conjunction to a nearby paper mill with the purpose of supplying electricity to the mill. The plant features a stunning peppermint colour scheme on the singular turbine and control panels. The turbine itself was produced by Siemens, a company established in 1904 in Berlin and is currently one of the most prominent manufactures of high powered gas turbines worldwide. The plant n also hosted two Steinmüller boilers. One of which was commissioned in 1954 and the other in 1965. Both the power station and the paper mill were decommissioned around 1999. From what we could see the paper mill had been stripped. But despite being closed for nearly 20 years the power station has remained in very nice condition. Visit Last stop for the day on a Euro trip with @darbians. We both wanted to see this site so we decided it was worth having a quick look before it got too dark. Even though it wasn't a large site there was still a good amount to photograph, in fact I wish I took more but here are the ones I did manage to get. (Excuse the awkward handheld shot) (Getting pretty dark by this point so we called it a day) Hope you enjoyed reading my report.
  15. visited with oliver GT and rustproofhawk ... After trying to see as much of Belgium as we could in four days, we all decided that im power station would be high on the list . The size of this place is immense and i found myself putting my tripod down wondering round and absorbing as much of the place as possible ive been back twice to this site and shots are from all three trips my apologies for not being able to find any history ... on with the pics ... IM POWER STATION control room... the cooling tower ... thanks for looking
  16. Ashworth Hospital is a high security psychiatric hospital at Maghull in the Metropolitan Borough of Sefton in Merseyside, England. Ashworth is one of only three high-security specialist psychiatric hospitals in England and Wales, along with Rampton and Broadmoor, that exist to work with people who require treatment due to their "dangerous, violent or criminal propensities". Ashworth was formed from the merger of the old Moss Side Hospital (originally a learning-disability unit once used for the treatment of "shell shock" in World War I) and the vastly more modern and considerably more appropriate Park Lane Hospital, opened as a Broadmoor overspill unit in the early 1970s. The hospital has had a mixed history and has been the subject of two major public inquiries: Blom-Cooper in 1992 and Fallon in 1998. It currently houses some 275 male patients. The old East site of the hospital has been leased to Her Majesty's Prison Service, and is now the location of HMP Kennet. thanks..
  17. Designed by Architect to the Metropolitan Police, John Dixon Butler FRIBA, the Greenwich Magistrates’ Court opened in 1909 with an integral police station. The Symmetrical frontage is faced in Portland Stone in a free Classical style and features a central semi-circular tablet with Royal Coat of Arms, carved in stone by Lawrence Turner. Inside, the entranceway leads to the former police station foyer which has a mosaic tiled floor with MP monogram (for Metropolitan Police) laid by Messrs Diespeker. The foyer leads onto Court 1, the main courtroom which is toplit with a decorative plaster frieze around the light well and a monogram of Edward VII in plaster above the bench. The Courtroom has mostly original fittings and the bench is in a curved recess, up three steps. The court has its own custody suite. The suite consists of nine prison cells with associated facilities for booking in prisoners etc. Visited here with @AndyK! a few months back. We sat on this for a while as we were hoping to return and see if we missed any bits but haven't got around to it. Anyway, I think we saw all the best bits. Here are some of my photos to begin with, and a few taken by Andy at the end. I also poached the history from his website report, so cheers for that! A few shots of the custody suite from Andy Thanks for looking
  18. First things first - this place is a death-trap. Simple as that. And it's quite likely to be worse now than it was when I went. But as I have a bit of an obsession about redundant old cinemas and theatres I left all common sense at the entrance. The building still shows signs of its grand past but sadly any possibility of saving it looks pretty slim, although a Trust has been set up to try to preserve it and bring it back into use. The four-storey building, designed by G. B. Rawcliffe, opened in 1894 as a music hall, before being converted to a cinema in 1938. It was last used as a bingo hall in 1995. ^^^ Not sure about that!
  19. I was not really sure what to expect from this place. It turned out to be a huge industrial playground with loads to have a look at. The size of this spot is awesome and I could not have asked for a better place to give my wide angle lens it's first outing. The workshops where another nice section in here. Some nice old machinery left to see. I really enjoyable explore this one and having a wide angle with me was a great bonus. Visited with non member Paul. HISTORY Pilkingtons was founded in 1826 as a partnership between members of the Pilkington and Greenall families, based in St Helens, Lancashire. It was originally named Greenall and Pilkington up until 1849. On the departure from the partnership of the last Greenall in 1845, the firm became known as Pilkington Brothers. The Kirk Sandall site came into existence in the early 1920's when the firm looked to establish another site in the UK. Kirk Sandall was an ideal situation. Its excellent waterway and railway facilities were conveniently sited, especially since the Great Central Railway Company had doubled its line in the area. After 76 year producing glass, the factory finally closed its doors in 2008. Not much has changed since it closed, most of it has remained abandoned but some of the site is used by Trackwork for training and storage. . Thanks For Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157684315511034/with/35460637944/
  20. Visited with @stranton And @ACID- REFLUX. Thx to them both for the great time had here. Anyways on with the report and pics History Inhospitable Inhospitable is a 700yd culvert which carries the moss brook beneath Collyhurst, the infall consists of a 15ft brick arch this changes too a10ft brick arch which continues towards the outfall which consists of a 7ft brick pipe built 8ft up in a retaining wall. Halfway through the culvert theres an overflow chamber with a manual operated penstock, once the flow gets too strong the penstock drops blocking the culvert this causes the brook too divert along the works something which seldon occurs. the Works the Works is a 700yd overflow which passes alongside and below Inhospitable, consists of a 10ft red and black brick pipe. This exits the overflow chamber by droping down 2 sets of steps the latter been steep, once at the bottom you are at least 70ft below the surface. Both the moss brook and the Works discharge too the Irk, (one of Manchesters 2 secondary waterways). Hope you all enjoy thx for looking..
  21. “This one will be something different than you might except†We found this location from the road. Tall chimney looming from the distance. In an area where only fields could be seen such structure makes you wonder what it really is. Since I was the driver I made a short decision. We have to check it out even if we had some plans already. Driving through wheat fields we reached some kind of industrial complex. We could notice that now most of the building were in use by some small companies that were using old production halls. Later searching the web I discovered that all those structures were once occupied by a flax processing plant / linen factory. Passing by all those adapted buildings we reached our destination – that tall chimney. It was located just in the center of the industrial complex. From outside it looked like an power plant/boiler. Later it turned out it served exactly this type of function. Building made out of red brick. Same with the chimney. Built by the Germans (during WWII) in 1942. Once it used to serve as power/heat source for all production halls. Since the factory has been liquidated and all production halls are now used by small companies the factory complex is open (I could park my car just next to the building). The power/heat is not needed anymore and from outside it looked that the power plant is shut off. We had a bit of difficulties to get in. Big steel door locked tight from any direction. Finally we found one sliding door which base could be moved and we were able to enter crawling on our bellies. First we entered the basement (not really interesting, lot of dust, dark space under the big hall in which there were furnaces). Finally we found the stairs and we entered the main hall of the power plant. The main instruments generating power had to be decommissioned/sold/removed. There was just the space, smell of motor oil. We found a small control room, engineer quarters. The inside of the building was interesting from the architectural point of view. There was also the hum of a transformer. One door was closed and we could guess that the power had to be switched here somehow – coming from some more modern power plant. Here the story could end and in general I wouldn’t even bother to share those picture I made back then here. But … there is another end to the story. We re-visited that place after one month. It turned out that 20 days later after our first visit someone started a fire in that place. Since there was still a lot of metal that could be salvaged someone tried to use some kind of torch. There was still a lot of the oil in the basement of the building. It lit up like a match. In the end 26 fire fighter units had to come to put the fire down. And so … this is what is left. If you have been in an abandoned structure you might know how it looks … have you revisited a structure after a massive fire ? Unfortunately a massive storm was coming when we revisited this place and I was unable to get exactly same angles of the shots .. but it will give you an idea anyway. The main hall – it used to host electric generators and after the fire On the right from the main hall there was a door. Behind it a stairs leading towards the engineer quarters And after it burned down An electric switchboard with all the gauges and controllers still feeding the power from the transformer and after the fire There was a small engineer room included in the main hall After the fire there is not much left from it The main from another angle looked like this. Door on the right open to another Hall in which there used to be furnaces but after the fire … its something totally different A big valve was still there before the fire but now and … of course … now there is no roof. Soon there will be trees growing here It seems we were the last people to immortalize this structure before the fire. Sad part it could be adapted somehow. Now … it will just decay. If you want to be more up to date with my finds or you want to see more photos (I dont share them all here for obvious reasons) visit my flickr or fb page.
  22. Having stumbled across a report from a couple years back and after a little bit of research later that evening me and Matt had a short drive over to Leeds to check out the "LOL drain" It's not that long but does have some nice bits and having only been in meanwood beck and the tunnels under roundhay park it was nice to see a place where you could admire the brickwork without scraping your head along the roof! Looking towards the River Aire Once you reach the end of the first tunnel you are greeted by this junction This bit did split off into a few separate smaller parts but after matt had a look in one and came back out feeling light-headed and feeling sick we quickly got out of that part Under the black gate things at the junction it opens up for a short while then back into a nice curved part Couple from the walk back out Cheers for looking
  23. Explored with Inside the Prohibited & a non member Background; Murphy's was established in 1930 as a tool and belt driven machinery manufacturers specialising in tanning and leather machines. They closed in 2002 after a huge decline in the demand for such machinery. The Explore; I'd been here once before with Raz and never expected to go back, however after a slight miscalculation (meaning to go to pilkington at Kirk Sandal and ending up in Kirk Woodhouse) we found ourselves nearby so popped out heads in for a look around. As you've seen in many reports there is a room with some rather graphic wall paper which disgusted one of our party so much i felt i couldn't take a snap without them thinking ill of me Killed an hour and i got some new angles so all in all no harm done Photos; Artistic Blur (I cant hold a camera for shit) Thanks for looking
  24. almost empty powerplant. but it was oke. nice lights,nice shadows. 01 02 03 04 05
  25. This currently serves as a Gala bingo hall but it used to be a cinema and the upstairs is no longer in use. It doesn't really warrant a proper report so I thought I'd stick it in here. I went for a nose around with extreme_ironing one evening after someone tipped me off that they thought much of the place has been disused for years. We found our way up to the upper circle which is gathering dust and has some paint peeling off the walls in places and from there we found our way inside the projection room. A couple of old projectors that haven't moved for over 40 years were a nice find. There wasn't much else to be seen in all honesty but it's a spectacular building and a real shame to see it going to waste. There were only 2 people playing bingo in the entire place on a Friday night. We shouted bingo from the balcony for shits and giggles before we left, only to find ourselves locked in. This was followed swiftly by an embarrassing call to staff down below to come and let us out. Not Pro. The cinema opened on 7 September 1931, as one of the Granada chain, and screened movies sometimes with stage shows or organ recitals until it closed as a cinema on 10 November 1973. The seating capacity was over 3000, and was often completely sold-out. Stars such as Frank Sinatra, Danny Kaye, The Andrews Sisters and Carmen Miranda gave concerts there. After closing as a cinema the building reopened as a bingo hall. BINGO! Amazing architecture An old spotlight gathering dust Dusty seats with the odd broken one..... The lost projectors Natural light coming through from the auditorium The Hall of Mirrors Thanks for looking
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