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  1. Not a bad little mooch this one. Quite a lot of area to cover with most of it being stripped unfortunately but, there is still stuff to see and some nice decay in parts. It seems the building was used to make carpet underlay form 2002 until 2013. I guess its been abandoned since then. Visited with non member Paul. History The Arrol-Johnston Motor Co., which had been in operation since 1896, opened its Dumfries factory at Heathhall in July 1913. The manager, Thomas Charles Pullinger, had been inspired by the Albert Kahn designed factories of Henry Ford in America. Kahn provided the design for the Dumfries factory, and it bears more than a passing resemblance to Ford's Highland Park factory in Detroit. The Heathhall factory was said to be the most advanced light engineering factory of its day in Scotland. The site was purchased by the North British Rubber Company in 1946. It then became Uniroyal Ltd in the 60's, and in 1987 changed yet again to the British subsidiary of the Gates Rubber Company. It has been known as Interfloor since 2002. . Thanks For Looking More pics on my Flicker page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157670753473708/with/43157314391/
  2. This courthouse is more then 14o years old. It has been empty for some years now and has a lot of treasures to offer. The courthouse is just huge. Many aisles, stairwells, offices and 14 boardrooms. In the entire building is still a lot of equipment available, the heaters are still running and the electricity is not turned off. In the basement, the light is burning in some rooms, files are still lying around and all the electric clocks in the house are still running.
  3. Nice place to visit, not much to see, but easy enough to get to. I did have a farmer watching me walk up the path, but nothing come of it, A good bit of history here: http://www.lovemywales.org/plasgwynfryn/ My Video https://youtu.be/4d5m012QWVs
  4. Millennium tower Salford quays It is not to be confused by the never-built London Millennium Tower (which could’ve gone up to 386 metres!). The dual building is a residential highrise located on the eastern side of the Media City Quays. The tallest one of the two is 67 metres, and the shorter one (Millennium Point) at around 45 metres. Designed to suit the modernised skyline of Salford, it has a rather minimalistic approach. Luckily not a lot of information can be salvaged from the internet, so I don’t have to type up much Had a look on the roof of the millennium tower. Was evening time so photos were late afternoon then a walk around media city. DSC_3193 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3229 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3229 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3221 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3205 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3203 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3198 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3253 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3252 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3244 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3240 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3239 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3234 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3238 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  5. Red Cross Hospital History Before it's closure at some point during the 1980's, it served as a children's hospital. It was thought to have been founded around the turn of the 20th century. The hospital was owned and managed by the charity 'Red Cross Italy' which becomes apparent from the rather large red cross on the ceiling of the chapel. The building itself resides near the edge of the mountain, roughly about 1100 metres above sea level which was a common practice for medical facilities Italy. It was believed that the air was fresher up in the mountains, more therapeutic and held medicinal properties, which was beneficial for the treatment of the patients. Our Visit Visited with @aWorldinRuins and @Ninja Kitten on a recent trip to Italy. This was the first stop on the tour and a revisit for myself. I was glad to go back, it's a very beautiful and photogenic location, in my opinion. I loved seeing all the beds, the chapel and the little classrooms again. As always, hope you enjoy my report! If you've got this far, thanks for reading
  6. I remember visiting the "Bureau Central" a fair few years ago and noticing the massive steel works next door that the offices were once the headquarters for. The entire works seemed to be abandoned, although the old office block had clearly been out of use for a lot longer. We added it to the list of places to check out and then forgot all about it. A few years later we found ourselves back in the area and I noticed the massive steel works that dominate Florange once again. This time around I was a lot more interested and we went for a drive around. It looked great, so added it to the next trip map. A couple of trips later, we'd had two visits to cover the place relatively thoroughly. History The late nineteenth century saw rapid developments in the production of iron. Areas with an abundance of iron ore benefited from the expanding industry and large plants were constructed. The blast furnaces and steel works in Florange is one such example, with massive expansion taking place in the early twentieth century. The first blast furnaces were built at the site in 1906, and later a huge steel works to convert the iron into steel. In total, six blast furnaces were built at the site. During the 1970s three of the six blast furnaces were refurbished, and their capacities increased. The other three furnaces were decommissioned and later demolished. The blast furnaces and steelworks while they were in use One of the oldest remaining parts of the site is a huge hall with 1919 emblazoned above the main entrance, which now contains a set of turbo-blowers for injecting high-pressure air into the blast furnaces. The hall would have originally contained an array of classic industrial machinery including mechanical blowers and alternators similar to those found at Power Plant X in Luxembourg. Electricity generation on the site ceased in the 1950s when Richemont Power Station took over, running on the blast furnace gasses produced by a number of steel works in the region. Production of iron and steel ceased in 2012 when the last remaining blast furnaces at the site were mothballed. It was announced the two blast furnaces would be maintained so they could be restarted if market conditions improved in the future, but were permanently shut down the following year. Now, the steel works and blast furnaces lay dormant, slowly rusting and being reclaimed by nature. Wagons stand still in the rail yard surrounded by overgrowth, the steel works silent and the furnaces lifeless. Bureau Central Let's start off where it all started off. The Bureau Central, the main offices of the Wendel empire. Exterior of the old office building. Not bad, eh? The interior has seen better days Many rooms and corridors had glass blocks in the ceiling to let natural light through to lower floors The Blast Furnaces Workers at the blast furnaces, pictured in 1952 Blast Furnaces viewed from the rail yard Coal wagons lined up below the blast furnaces Base of one of the blast furnaces Inside a blast furnace building Inside another blast furnace building Spiral staircase Exterior with the water tower in the distance View up a blast furnace Wagons under a blast furnace The blast furnace control room had been modernised Turbo Blower House and Workshops The blower house is where the turbo-fans are located. They were responsible for blowing the huge amounts of air required by the blast furnaces. This cavernous building would have once housed a set of classic engines for blowing the air, along with a power plant, all of which was removed in the 1970s. Turbo-fan sets 1 and 2 There was one blower set for each blast furnace Side view of the huge blowers Turbo-fan 3 The green motor for fan 3 Historic control panel from when older machines were used The machines this panel controlled were removed a long time ago Newer control room for the turbo-blowers Turbo-blower control room Workshop area Workshops Locker room Railway and Coal / Iron Ore Delivery Area The steelworks had its own station for the delivery of coal and raw materials such as iron ore which would be emptied into hoppers below. A lot of wagons are parked on the tracks. Wagons parked in the delivery station Track over the coal and iron ore hoppers with blast furnaces behind Nature is starting to reclaim the tracks Blast furnace and wagons Trains would drop their content directly into the hoppers below Steel works The steelworks took the pig iron produced by the blast furnaces and converted into steel. Historic photos of the steelworks, pictured in 1952 Sign in the steelworks View along one of the many long sections View down the steelworks View in the opposite direction Work area between machinery Ladles lined up in the ladle bay One of the ladles tipped up Wider view of the ladles One of the work bays Another work bay Crane lowered in one of the bays Furnaces for melting iron and scrap Track for moving ladles Electromagnetic lifting gear Rolling Mill The mill is where the steel products are finished off and rolled or shaped into their final forms. Plant in the rolling mill Plant in the rolling mill Lifting gear in the mill Crane hooks in the mill Tracks leading to mill equipment Accidental selfie with a "HFX" sign. In keeping with the other European steelworks known as "HF4", "HF6", "HFB", etc. I initially called the place HFX. It's actually the abbreviation for "Hauts Fourneaux", the French plural of Blast Furnaces.
  7. Shaw Brothers (HK) Ltd was the largest film production company of Hong Kong. In 1925, three Shaw brothers - Runje, Runme, and Runde - founded Tianyi Film Company (also called Unique) in Shanghai, and established a film distribution base in Singapore, where Runme and the youngest brother, Run Run Shaw, managed the precursor to the parent company, the Shaw Organisation. In 1957, Run Run Shaw moved to Hong Kong, set up a new company called Shaw Brothers (Hong Kong) Ltd, and built a new studio at Clearwater Bay, which officially opened in 1961 as Movietown. In the mid-1960s, Movietown was the largest and best-equipped studio in Chinese filmmaking as well as the largest privately owned studio in the world, with 15 stages, two permanent sets, state-of-the-art film-making equipment and facilities, and 1,300 employees. The 1960s was a period of intense rivalry between Shaw Brothers and Cathay Organisation, but eventually Shaw Brothers gained the upper hand and Cathay ceased film production in 1970. Some of Shaw Brothers' most notable films were made in this period, including The Magnificent Concubine, The Love Eterne, as well as One-Armed Swordsman, which broke the box office records and spawned multiple sequels. Over the years the film company produced some 1,000 films, some of them being the most popular and significant Chinese-language films of the period. The studio popularised the kung-fu genre of films, which later included Five Fingers of Death and The 36th Chamber of Shaolin. In the 1970s, Shaw Brothers faced a strong challenge from a new studio, Golden Harvest, which had considerable success internationally with the martial arts film 'Enter the Dragon' starring Bruce Lee. Shaw Brothers then also began to co-produce films with western producers for the international market, and invested in films such as Meteor and Blade Runner. However, Shaw Brothers ceased film production in 1986 because of competition from Golden Harvest and increasing piracy, focusing instead on TV production. In 1986, Movietown became TV City, which was leased to TVB for TV production. In 1988, the company was reorganized under the umbrella of Shaw Organisation. In the 1990s, Shaw again started making a few films, but no longer on the same scale as before. In 2011 Shaw Brothers was reorganised into the Clear Water Bay Land Company Limited, its film production business being taken over by other companies within the Shaw conglomerate. Shaw Studios / Movietown has been vacant since 2003. There are plans to eventually turn it into a Grade I historical site but there is no sign of this taking place at the moment. Shaw Studios has since relocated to a new site in Tseung Kwan O, Hong Kong. Hong Kong is extremely hot and humid at this time of year, often with up to 95% humidity, so this was a tiring explore. The mosquitoes and cockroaches absolutely love it though so you're never short of a few friends along the way ..... If you ever come here, definitely pack some bug spray. Now, despite covering a lot of ground in a few hours here, we only managed to see a fraction of what is left. It's absolutely massive. There are a couple of active looking buildings but the majority is completely deserted. I wish we'd gone back to see the rest but too many #gintops (don't ask *smh*) got in the way. Hong Kong's a pretty epic place but I would recommend visiting at another time of year to avoid the humidity. There's a lot to explore so I may return next year. Shaw studios will be the first place I come back to if I do. For a more extensive report check out drhowser's report here > https://www.28dayslater.co.uk/threads/shaw-bros-studios-hong-kong-sept-17.109830/#post-1182300 This building appeared to be set up for functions Studio named after George Clooney randomly Rooms of old film reels and projection equipment just lying around.... This was the guy who made it all happen. He lived until the age of 106!! RIP Sir Shaw 謝謝你的期待
  8. A little gem of a place ...went here when it was guarded by a very irate bull lol
  9. It’s been a while for various reasons but I am back and hitting the “move along, nothing to see here” central resource library… no seriously, nothing to see here. So after a brief chat with who turned out to be a long time reader and follower through instagram, we chose a spot to meet and hit the central resource library. Now to be honest, I was pre warned over a year ago that this place is absolutely trashed and I can confirm exactly that but it’s one I can now tick off the list. There’s not much to see, unless smashed windows and terrible graffiti is your thing so there is a lack of photos and hardly warranting a report, but here we go anyway! History wise? It’s a library… it closed and moved to a new location, that’s pretty much all I can say!
  10. This one was visited on my latest trip through Germany. This was the water treatment facility of a power plant. That power plant is already gone. There were also some outdoor water basins ,but they were well overgrown. The only thing I took from this facility were several mosquito's bites. IMG_0345-bewerkt by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_0337 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_0376 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_0366-HDR by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_0408 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_0394 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_0364-bewerkt-bewerkt by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
  11. History The engineering company J.E. Billups of Cardiff who also constructed Mireystock Bridge and the masonry work on the Lydbrook viaduct commenced construction of the tunnel in 1872 using forest stone. The tunnel is 221 metres in length and took 2 years to construct. The tunnel allowed the connection of the Severn and Wye Valley railway running from Lydney with the Ross and Monmouth network at Lydbrook. The first mineral train passed through the tunnel on 16 August 1874. Passenger services commenced in September 1875 pulled by the engine Robin Hood. The history of this section of line is not without incident - a railway ganger was killed in the tunnel by a train in 1893 and a locomotive was derailed by a fallen block of stone in the cutting at the northern entrance in 1898. The line officially closed to passenger trains in July 1929 but goods trains continued to use the line until the closure of Arthur & Edward Colliery at Waterloo in 1959 and Cannop Colliery in 1960. Lifting of the track was completed in 1962. The tunnel and cutting were buried with spoil in the early 1970's. Thanks to the vision and enthusiasm of a group of local Forest railway enthusiasts assisted by Forest Enterprise the top of the northern portal of the tunnel (with its unusual elliptical shape) which has lain buried for 30 years has now been exposed. As of 2018 the tunnel now still lays abandoned with no sign of the cycle track and the £50,000 funding seemingly gone to waste. Pics Thanks for looking
  12. I was passing here today on way home from work so called in to have a look ...Quite a nice little explore ☺️
  13. Visited this one with @AndyK! and @darbians as the first real stop on a big week-long derp bonanza of some sort, after two fails the day before this (after a 12+ hour drive). We had checked it out the night before, without much luck, so as it was getting late, and we were all suffering massive sleep deprivation, we decided to turn in for the night. But before leaving town in the morning for the next few stops, we decided to have another try with the help of daylight, and it sure paid off. I can't find a lot of history on this place, it seems to be quite the 'ghost' online, but it does boast some pretty epic vintage machines. What's interesting here is that it is all preserved so well, yet there are no signs of potential conversion into event space or something similar, which is something that happens a lot with these kinds of places. Photos - Cheers 😎
  14. Premier inn Manchester Visited with @GK-WAX and @vulex we was after a little get together so decided on a nice relaxed evening chilling on the Manchester skyline. After a very hot day was good to unwind and take in Liverpool he view and watch the world go by below us. DSC_3169 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3172 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3175 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3165 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3152 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3150 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3134 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3117 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3187 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3184 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3183 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3180 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3182 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3121 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3135 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3138 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3148 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3153 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3157 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3161 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3162 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3164 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3176 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  15. Hi all I'm back again! Today we went and visited an old boarding school in Chichester. We did not know if the place was abandoned but we got a tip to say it "might" be abandoned. Well...we went to check out this place and my god it has got to be one of the better ones I've been to. No graffiti onsite but just an awesome explore all in all! HISTORY: The site itself originally started life as a boarding school and has a full range of classrooms, studios and offices. They had an onsite IT room which could fit up to 20 students at a time and also 2 large greenhouses for training in horticultural skills. The centre itself was very highly-regarded in the area and was built within the grounds of a grade II listed house. It went on to become a residential educational and training centre until the site officially closed its doors in 2011. Enjoy the video and if you really liked it feel free to subscribe to our channel!
  16. Hi all, We went and visited a WW2 Shelter last night on the outskirts of London. The place was absolutely incredible and even had left behind remnants. We found it that it had been unsealed again so we decided to set off straight away as we did not want to miss this chance. I hope you enjoy the video! HISTORY: I couldn't find to much however the shelter was built on the grounds of Cane Hill Asylum around the time of WW2. There were also another 3 tunnels built at the same time. Sometime after the war the tunnels were bought by a specialist manufacture of optical devices which included mainly lenses for large telescopes. The Company left the site in the early 70s to then go on and finish trade in 1978. It basically then turned into a tipping site for old car parts until they were sealed up by the local council.
  17. My take on Prison 15H and from what I gather there is going to be a fair few from this place coming to a forum near you Soon! Thanks to Phantom Bish and Camera shy for the Intel. Cheers guys. Seems we where out the same weekend as Mr Bish but missed him by a day.. Early morning start and a Euro tunnel trip purely to do this place and then home intime for tea..This is an advantage of living 45 mins from the Euro tunnel, met many euro explorers while in the place and some well kitted up graffers on the way out.,Other than that no problems where had,even the Gypo colony in the car park wasn’t an issue.. Enough bollox from me and here’s 15 of the 230 odd I took 60% of them I was happy with but no one wants to see a apic heavy report of the place!! Explored with Sx-riffraff,Obscurity,Spaceinvader and Urban Ginger
  18. Villa Scorpio History Unfortunately I couldn't find a great deal of history surrounding this location but from what I have gathered it was built at some point during the late 19th century. The former occupier owned a large cement factory in the same town. I would imagine the family were quite well off, as it was very grand and exquisite building. The design of the villa shared various similarities with the Art Nouveau style of architecture. Featuring a stunning staircase, a beautiful skylight and an decorative greenhouse. Our visit Visited with @darbians and @vampiricsquid on our tour of Italy last summer. As soon as we arrived outside, we knew it was going to be a good explore. Hope you enjoy my photos! Externals Internals
  19. Colonia IL / Mono Orphanage History The orphanage was built on the border of Switzerland and Italy. Sadly there doesn't seem to be a lot of information out there regarding this location. From what I've gathered it originally served as an orphanage and at some point in time, it was also used as a summer camp. Despite being closed during the 1970's, it has remained in pretty good condition with minimal graffiti and vandalism. Visit Visited again with @darbians and @vampiricsquid. Unfortunately when we visited the beds had been removed but lucky there was still a lot left to photograph. The chapel was absolutely stunning and it was nice to see that some furniture, including the desks from the classrooms were still there. All in all an excellent location to finish off our Italian adventure.
  20. The small abandoned village called Polphail was built during the early 1970s to provide accommodation for up to 500 workers at a nearby oil platform construction yard in Portavadie. Unfortunately the yard was never completed and the village then lay dormant having never been occupied. The huge basin that was blasted out of the shore was dubbed ''The most expensive puddle in the world''. There have been development plans brought to the table including demolishing the site for a new marina, however due this was abandoned due to bats roosting there.
  21. After visiting a different location in the city we got a tip off from others about a possible entry point so decided to take a look. Having assessed the building for security we made our way to the entry point. The building is situated in the Neepsend area of the city and forms part of Kelham island one of the oldest industrial sites in Sheffield which as an heritage for producing high-quality cutlery and edge-tools and its pre-eminence in manufacturing heavy specialist steels. The victorian grade II listed building once occupied by Barnsley resides in 37 thousand Sq ft of industrial heritage and is the last significant development opportunity in Kelham island. Today Kelham is a mixed use riverside development which compromise the creation of old and new use of buildings forming apartments, bars & restaurants, and commercial space on the riverside site of former workshops. The development is part of an ongoing regeneration of the area by AXIS and others, which started in the 1990s with Cornish place. The development is intended to create a desirable place to live with a brand new public square, and continuation of the Don riverside walk project. Due to increasing competition from imports, Sheffield has seen a decline in heavy engineering industries since the 1960s, which has forced the sector to streamline its operations and lay off the majority of the local employment. George Barnsley's is a little like stepping back inside a time machine, most of the original machinery and features still exist and for this alone is well worth a visit before the inevitability of re development. Also noteworthy is the local artists that decorate the building with graffiti and art which gives the explore a real urban edge. And to end off a pic from modern day... I went back to this place the other day... Opening the gate to enter i didn't bother going in, the old man was right it is a dump in there and natural decay has took over... but that said if you have never been in take a look, you can get some nice shots even with a crappy iPhone
  22. A revisit @ The Christallerie didnt have much time first visit ......... 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. If anyone can tell what the House Of Esher was going to be i would love to know visited with Critical Mass & Host 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. Cheers for looking Oldskool .........
  23. It was my Father's birthday... so i took him down to Plymouth and over to Drake Island as a present... in an 8ft dinghy! It's a fantastic place, steeped in history from way back in 1135 and this is worth a read - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drake%27s_Island. Sorry the pictures lack quality, the majority were taken with a camera phone but that's another story, alas, here are a few... The target. The approach. Barracks. Seagull spotter. Cartridge Lift. My shorts were on and the chicken legs on show. Old meets new... Napoleonic fortification with WWII addition. Waves crashing against the island, over and over with spray coating the pillbox, day in and day out. Up top on the centre battery, looking back towards the barracks with Plymouth in the distance. Where things went... boom! ... and last but by no means least, more guns!
  24. Following on from our escapades here is another report from The Derpy Rotten Scoundrels Euroderp Tour earlier this year. Having spent the previous day dicking about by Lake Como, swimming in the lake, the lads got their broga on, whilst Disco Kitten put everyone to shame with her epic yoga skills. fortytwo went jungleering and spent the day battling beasts in the wilderness and arrived back after a fight with a snake. Deciding we were on the move the next day we set up camp in a derelict house looking out over the lake. Chilled out with beer and did the only to do when your Euroderping and your derp has an awesome white wall, slammed Indian Jones and the Temple of Doom on the projector and settled in for the night! Our plan was to head for the Holy Grail of NPU, having visited previously I was still excited about the chance of a revisit. So we loaded up the limo and Zsa Zsa and headed off with a plan to hit the Animal Testing Facility on the way. This is another place that is proper trashed but good for a mini derp adventure. I have no idea of its full name, or where it is as I do an excellent job of sleeping as soon as Im in the car. Its a nice little walk in and there is still some interesting stuff in there to see. I've gleaned a little bit of history from some dude who went in 2016. The place belonged to a Swiss Company who were apparently big in the animal testing industry, they moved to this site and rented the building, however when the rental contract ran out they didn't renew the contract and it fell into disrepair. The land it is built on is partly poisoned, due to there being a chemical site their previously and isn't likely to be cleaned up anytime soon. A couple of years after the facility closed it was hit by a fire, causing acrid fumes to permeate the local area. Firefighters arrived and found evidence the fire had been started deliberately but were able to stop the fire fairly quickly. Although they contained the fire, the whole site had to be checked due to rumours of the facility being occupied by refugees and concerns over the local kids playing in the buildings. The facility still has the animal operating/autopsy table in place and there is lots of medical equipment lying around, lamps, autoclaves and a gloved box unit. Anyway here's a few pics (all from my phone as I lost the ones I took on my camera ) Thanks for looking
  25. Solo jaunt. I'd looked at this a year back, but was too tired waiting for security to move away when stood at the fence. So having done another explore nearby earlier, I made another trek up to Harpur Hill. I'm well known for being a huge fan of railways and trains in particular, considering this is where my roots in exploring and much of my childhood are. That said I snub stuff like DMUs/EMUs and Underground stock, simply because they don't have the same appeal as the rusting, decayed hulk of a loco. I'm sure all of you can agree. So why did I make the effort with this? Well, three things: I've photographed a lot of the withdrawn Underground stock that's being shipped to Booth's in Rotherham, so that piqued my interest a bit. Secondly, now the last of the 1983 stock has been moved after 15+ years in open storage from South Harrow to Booth's, these have become EXTREMELY rare so it's worth capturing this whilst it's around in such a photogenic state. Lastly, I may as well have a look if I'm in the area. Comparing to pictures from a few years ago, a lot of the stock that was stored here has been moved away and presumably scrapped, leaving three driving cars: one outside, two inside. As far as I'm aware the stock is used in bomb testing of some kind, and evacuation techniques in light of the 7/7 bombings. Maybe. It's a health and safety testing site so it makes sense. Already somewhat knackered from earlier, I dragged myself up to Harpur Hill, and all was quiet. No security, no sign of activity across the site. Get over the fences and you're in, nice and easy. So that's what I did. If I'm not mistaken, this is the ex-Cockfosters or Acton stock that's moved here. After years of open storage and vandalism, the carriages have been completely sabotaged inside and out, but nevertheless are chock full of photogenic features. To paraphrase my favourite band, I can think of no greater caption than "Welcome to the scene of the crash"... Despite being graffed up inside, it was interesting to see the cabs virtually intact and untouched. From experience these are often the places where (guilty as charged, I did once as a kid) people often nick stuff for souvenirs and the like. Either that or they smash them up. Dead end The bomb tunnel Not in service To conclude, it's not that interesting a site but it's worth sharing. Sadly I feel I'm clutching at straws now that en-masse withdrawals, scrapping and storage of locos that for decades were commonplace have long since ended. Long gone are the days of asking permission from the yard foreman to look round a depot to take pictures of the derelict stock left there. Long gone are the days when you can easily sneak in undetected and not have to face the wrath of a bolshy prick who you have the misfortune of being caught by, notwithstanding more CCTV, formidable fencing and most of all, the threat of a fine and prosecution by BTP. The answer is yes, a report I posted on 28 in 2011 led to BTP knocking at my door and fining me £50 for trespass. Not a lot relative to what it could have been, but still I was out of pocket all because I posted it publicly. True, there are still some true goldmines left on the continent, the prime examples of which are Falkenberg/Elster and Istvantelek in Germany and Hungary respectively, but nothing in the UK anymore. Not unless it's covered by CCTV and forbids photographers most of the time. Life goes on though, eh? Love and best wishes as always, TBM x
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