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  1. Bowling World – Belgium Closed in late 2015. It closed due to a decline in custom and proposed development on the site of this bowling alley and dance hall next door.
  2. The Explore I actually explored this about eight weeks ago with Southside. I drove to Slough, Parked up and he had kindly found the way in before I got to the University Campus. The site is massive, and right in the centre of Slough. I work fairly close to Slough, and had seen the site some weeks before when collecting lunch from Roosters Piri Piri just opposite the site. It's kind of strange that its sat here for so long; its very close to London and land in this general area is typically very, very expensive. That does not of course, make Slough a pleasant place... I think there was a bit of an increase of traffic here after my visit, I have only just got around to editing these! Its amazing how such a large site has sat beneath the radar for such a long time!!! The Site Thames Valley University or TVU as its known; is part of the University of West London and formed part of a conglomerate of several campuses in Reading and West London. The closure of this Campus was announced in 2009 and the doors finally closed it's doors in 2010. The site has now fallen into disuse and it's 1000 students had to re-locate to other campuses around West London. Closure was blamed on the recession/credit crunch at the time; forcing the sale of the site. "Professor Peter John, TVU vice-chancellor, said: 'For the majority of students the closure of the campus will mean a move to one of our other locations either in Reading or West London. All those affected will be fully supported through the transition to minimise any possible disruption to their studies.' A total of 650 pre-registration nursing students at the Slough campus will be provided with a provisional timetable and have been told to pack their bags for the move to Reading by December this year." The site consists of two tower blocks (7 stories high), a ground floor canteen, a small circular building named "The Rotunda" which houses the University's Srudent Uninon, and a 2 story admin block. Plans were announced in 2017 to redevelop the site into 1,400 homes, but so far nothing has happened. Currently the site is owned by the Slough Council. It was a surprisingly relaxed explore. The road outside was very, very busy and all could be heard on the street outside. There were incredibly recent signs of a squat inside one of the rooms; fresh new sleeping bags and food dated for that day in bags; sandwiches, fruit etc. I could hear someone inside who I believe left when they heard us. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21 #22 #23 #24 #25 #26 #27 Thanks for reading! More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157696167343975
  3. Haus der Offiezere My first report. I have had this account for about a year but never posted anything from fear of my photos not being good enough to post. Decided to pluck up the courage to start contributing more but I apologise if there are any mistakes. Anyway, on to the history! History The Haus der Offiezere was originally established as a shooting range between Kummersdorf and Jüterbog in 1888. It wasn't until 1910, when construction of the Berlin to Dresden railway line took place, it was decided that Wunsdorf held a significant strategic advantage and because of this it became a military headquarters two years following. A telephone and telegraph office was built in 1912. By the start of the first world war, Wunsdorf had already become Europe's largest military base, boasting 60,000 acres of land. A year later, the first mosque was built in Germany on the site. This was to accommodate for the Muslim prisoners of war which were housed there. They were known as the Halbmondlager or Crescent Moon camp. After the war, the Wunsdorf Headquarters was converted into a military sports school in 1919. It was even used to train athletes for the Olympic games in Berlin in 1936. During the uprising of the Third Reich, a network of highly modernised tunnels and bunkers were built, including a communications centre, known as the Zeppelin. A year Maybach I and II were built which coincided with the Zeppelin bunker. A ring tunnel connected all the bunkers to each other and were disguised as ordinary homes on the ground, to avoid suspicion. The construction of these bunkers wasn't completed until 1940, a year after war was declared. From 1943 the Haus der Offiezere was temporarily converted into a hospital to treat wounded German soldiers. Two years later, in 1945 the Red Army had invaded East Germany and quickly seized control of Wunsdorf. This was when it was renamed the Haus der Offiezere which translates to House of the Officer. During Soviet occupation of Wunsdorf in the GDR, the Haus der Offiezere became a place of art and culture. The former sports halls and gymnasiums were torn down and replaced with elaborate theatres and concert halls. Daily deliveries of supplies came all the way from Moscow on a direct train line and the locals nicknamed it 'little Moscow' due to the number of roughly 60,000 Russian inhabitants. This continued for almost 50 years, until the reunification of Germany when it was handed back. The last remaining Russians eventually left in 1994 and it has remained unoccupied since. Visit The photos I have compiled for this post were taken on two separate occasions. Wanted to give a good representation of the location, as there is a lot to see. Unfortunately some of my photographs were taken when I first started getting into the hobby, so I hope they do enough justice and excuse the quality of said images. Second visit was on a solo trip to Germany, giving me plenty of time to mooch. Would consider the Haus der Offiezere one of my favourite locations and I hope you enjoy my report. Externals Internals Thank you for reading.
  4. Red Morgue Hospital History I couldn't find huge amount history on this location but from what I've gathered the hospital was built at some point in the early 20th century. It was funded by investors and at a time when nursing care was predominately carried out by the clergy. They wanted the hospital to become more secular in order to distance themselves from the church. The hospital was mainly used for surgery and featured several operating theatres but later on a maternity ward and outpatient clinic was introduced. About 90 years later the orginal hospital building was combined with a larger nearby hospital. The Red Morgue hospital was eventually closed around 2013. By this time it was only used to see outpatients, as most of it's services were provided by the new hospital which was more modern and sophisticated. Visit Visited with @darbians on a weekend trip to Belgium. I was really keen to see this one after finding out about it and seeing a few photographs. It was great to see an old hospital in fairly good condition with some items still left, combined with a nice bit of decay. As always, hope you enjoy my photos ? (Spot the rookie error ?) If you've got this far, thanks for reading!
  5. History Once the magnificent property in East Germany housed a spa building. Around 1950, the building was converted into a hotel, which was given the name of a Duchess. In the 90s, it was closed for cost reasons, since it decays visibly. The Explore Access was easy; the front door was locked, but some open windows and a open door at the back. My first visit was in 2011. Now I returned to see how the building has changed over the past seven years. Many ceilings and floors had collapsed meanwhile, and some areas I could't enter therefore. Unfortunately, some things were destroyed by vandalism or were stolen. For example, all banisters and the ornamented window arches. But on the other hand, the natural decay of the past few years has been very interesting. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Here are also a few comparison pictures and some photos from 2011 of rooms that couldn't be entered anymore today. 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 - Also this rose has been gone due to the collapse of the ceiling.
  6. St Josephs Orphanage / Mount Street Hospital Even though this location has already been done by every man and his dog, I decided to chuck a quick report up anyway. As stated above in the title of my report, this one features photographs taken mostly on the first visit and one taken on another which will become clear towards the end. History St Joseph's Orphanage was designed by architect R.W Hughes in the style of gothic architecture, which was typical of that particular era. The construction work was endowed by Maria Holland, a wealthy widow, who contributed a sum of 10,000 to achieve this. She wanted to care for the sick, at a time when Preston had the highest mortality rate in the UK. This was predominately due to inadequate housing and the poor working conditions in the local mills and factories. The orphanage was first officially opened in the September of 1872 and five years later it became St Joseph's Institute for the Sick & Poor. The hospital accommodated for around 25 patients and was run by the Sisters of Charity of Our Lady Mother of Mercy. Voluntary contributions funded the maintenance and general upkeep of the hospital and it was also the first provider of welfare to Roman Catholic girls in Preston. In 1910 the hospital was granted its first operating theatre, as well as the chapel being built that same year. By 1933 a new wing was added and another in 1958 which was officiated by Princess Marina, the Duchess of Kent. During both world wars it served as a military hospital to treat wounded British and Dutch soldiers. One of St Joe's most famous patients was performer George Formby who died of a heart attack at the hospital in 1961. The hospital eventually closed its doors in 1982. It was then bought by its current owner who converted it into a care home until 2003. A year later in 2004, plans were proposed to convert the building into 82 flats with a grant of £2m but the redevelopement never seemed to happen. Presently 3 sections of the site are still classified as grade II listed and the building was recently featured on the Victorian Society's 'top most at risk historic buildings in the UK.' Visit Visited with @scrappy. This one has been on my to do list since I really started exploring but I never got round to doing it until recently. Despite being pretty fucked from years of neglect, local kids, general arseholes etc, I did still quite enjoy seeing this one finally. The main purpose of my visit was photographing a newly discovered section which certainly didn't disappoint, as well as the operating lights being rather pretty too (so glad no one has smashed those up yet.) All in all still a fairly nice location and worth popping by if you're in the area. As always, hope you enjoy my report! Started tidying up my photos of the chapel and went a little overboard... (Obligatory hospital wheelchair photo...) Now onto the best part Once we found out all the doors had been mysteriously removed we decided to go back again for more photos. If you've got this far, thanks for reading!
  7. Visited with Mookster on a small short road trip around the midlands back in March. This site was absolutely wrecked throughout and of little interest. An 80s style factory which closed sometime in 2016. But it was still an explore! James Thomas Engineering was started in a small garage in Bishampton England in 1977. The business grew and moved to a converted office unit, to a much larger 5000 square foot unit in 1980. This planted the seeds for a new industry leader in aluminium all purpose truss design. By 1983, James Thomas developed a pre-rigged truss design used by major rock bands on world tours. By 1990, JTE began manufacturing in the USA to keep truss design moving on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean. Come 1992, the super truss system was designed. The Company was Liquidated in 2017 #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157694367095931
  8. On first sight, there´s only a plain building hidden between bushes and coniferes. It´s located on the grounds of a former Soviet military base in Germany. It seems to be like other barracks, nothing special. Yet, while approaching the barrack, attached high walls with barbed wire appear forming a small yard. Rustling branches of the trees which are now growing all over the yard and an icy wind add to the somewhat eerie atmosphere. On entering the building, the darkness is starting to hit you in an instant. Only sparse light shines in. Additionally, the walls were painted with dark and unfriendly colours. Surely, not without reason - simple, yet efficient psychologial means. Here, at the latest, the purpose of the building becomes crystal-clear: it was used as a jail by the Soviet occupiers. What kind of offenses were punished with a stay inside one of these dark cells with bald walls - only equipped with some wooden plank beds - is unknown. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
  9. Visited with The Kwan on a rainy Saturday, some lovely bits left in the area and we missed quite a bit so theres always an excuse for a return visit. Some History The name Ratgoed derives from “Yr Allt Goed”, which means the steep, wooded hillside. Ratgoed mine was also sometimes known as “Alltgoed”. The Ratgoed slate workings lie at the head of what was originally called Cwm Ceiswyr but became known as Cwm Ratgoed because of the quarry. It lies north of Aberllefenni and northwest of Corris in, what is now, the Dyfi Forest. The slate that was quarried at Ratgoed was the Narrow Vein. This runs from south of Tywyn, on the coast, to Dinas Mawddwy about 18 miles inland and follows the line of the Bala Fault. The Narrow Vein was worked along its length at places such as Bryneglwys near Abergynolwyn; Gaewern & Braich Goch at Corris, Foel Grochan at Aberllefenni and Minllyn at Dinas Mawddwy. The slate at Ratgoed dips at 70° to the southeast, the same as Foel Grochan. Ratgoed was a relatively small working, it was worked from around 1840 until its closure in 1946. Pics [ [ Le Kwan Thanks for looking
  10. Hello, This was my 16th visit to Belgium for Exploring! Was a great little explore, only history I could find is below. It is a mix between DLSR and phone photos. This power plant was built in 1960 and operated on gas . In 2014, the plant was closed. 40 jobs were lost. It turns out that the electricity in the whole place is still working and the computers are still running!
  11. Another one from early last year. A nice mix on the same site this one with the awesome old wooden part next to a burned out, vandalised, graffiti strewn new part. It brought into sharp contrast the difference between a interesting and unique explore with loads to see and photograph and a wreaked, empty and mostly uninteresting burned out shell. The feeling of enjoyment and satisfaction I got from both was definitely different. I found it an interesting experience in this mad hobby we do. Visited with non member Paul. HISTORY The Old Fisons site was originally the location for the first ever complete superphosphate factory. In the mid 19th century, the increasing demand for new effective fertilisers for agriculture led to a search for a substitute for crushed bones, the traditional source of fertiliser. Edward Packard discovered that the use of fossil dung, found across East Anglia, contained high levels of phosphate, the ideal base for fertiliser. Between 1851 and 1854, Packard built a warehouse at Paper Mill Lane and pioneered the production of artificial fertilisers for horticulture on an industrial scale. It was an ideal site due to the combination of the River Gipping, which was navigable by barges between Ipswich and Stowmarket from the late 18th century onwards, and the addition of the railway line in 1846 which both provided the means to import raw materials and export fertilisers. Edward Packard was joined in 1858 by Joseph Fison who constructed his chemical works opposite the North Warehouse. The lower two floors of this iconic warehouse date from this time and were used for bagging and storage and are identified on early Ordnance Survey maps as the Eastern Union Works, proving the North Warehouse was purpose-built and directly associated with the production of superphosphates. The factory shut its doors in 2002 and has remained empty ever since. . . Thanks for Looking All the best for the New Year More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157678463886994/with/33624996416/
  12. Visited with banned batz and andy. First time out for awhile included a trip here. This was owned by Samuel Firth of Gatehead, Marsden, and opened in 1888. He also owned Holme Mill.By the 60s, it was owned and run by Fisher, Firth & Co. which became Cellars Clough Woollen Mills Ltd, managed by another Firth son, in 1981. The company has now been dissolved.At its height it employed 180 people but the mill shut down in 1982. There are currently plans to try and convert it in to apartments.
  13. Well here is my first report on the site so please be gentle !! Wasn't sure what to expect with this it was either going to be a fail or a quick mooch round a yard but how wrong I was ! Was there for several hours and the place is a lot bigger than it looks and relatively untouched, it made for an enjoyable morning and a lot of pictures to go through. Below is a History of the place and then the pics. There were also some resedential properties here but were all much of the same and not of any real interest.... The British pig industry owes a huge debt of gratitude to its centre of research and development done here. The UK pig industries Development Unit, in Bedfordshire was opened by Lord Belstead, Minister of State (Lords), Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Foods in November 1984. Over the years it has undergone many changes but has always been at the forefront of research firmly aimed at delivery of practical opportunities, work which could be quickly disseminated and implemented on working pig farms. At its peak the unit employed 10 staff and had 300 sows farrow to finish. However major changes in the industry and a fundamental shift in the strategy of the British Pig Executive (BPEX) meant it was no longer needed and over the last six months has been gradually wound down. The final piece of research work was completed in May 2007, part of the Defra LINK �3.5m weaner research programme. The centre's part was to look at weaner diets that maximised the use of home-grown cereals and oilseeds. To the end, the stock performed excellently with weaning to slaughter growth rates of 740g/day and grower to slaughter in excess of 1050g/day. A BPEX Director of Pig Industry Development said: "It has been a huge asset to the industry over the years and we are sad to see it go. "BPEX carried out a major review of its research and development and unfortunately itdidn't fit into the new perspective." Research over the years Over the years, the work has included: - Introduction of soya bean meal to pig diets - Copper sulphate as a growth promoter - Evaluation of commercial genotypes for sow productivity, growth - Performance and carcase and meat quality (Stotfold First Trial) - Development of ultrasound technology for carcase composition - Blueprint for pig meat eating quality - Stotfold sow lactation feeding strategy - Phase-feeding - protein requirements of commercial genotypes - Established speed of growth and pork tenderness were positively correlated - Liquid feeding offers savings of 14p/kg dead weight - Liquid feeding halves the percentage of pigs testing positive for Salmonella at slaughter BPEX has been exploring the redevelopment of the site and planning permission is being applied for.
  14. Easter Weekend - myself, Silverainbow, HitGirl, Rich, Harry, Greg and Kevin. The freezing temperatures, bitter wind and snow would not ruin a great day exploring Dover. These various sites have been done inside out by so many people, so I won't bore you with the history of them all, but their histories can all be easily found online. We began the day early with Z Rocket at St Margaret's, complete with it's own Labrador guard dog. It was extremely dry down here, but a good start to the day. Moving on to North Entrance, the roof vent had been cleared of crap, creating a lovely bright light down into the tunnel. HitGirl had to be talked through the spiders in the tunnels between the water tanks here, but she braved it well. It was then time to head to Hospital Postern, a staircase, where a few artistic shots were taken with tea lights and wire wool. The climb back from here was slippery, and the polystyrene-like snow didn't help! A quick break for lunch, where Harry got well acquainted with a local pensioner, before heading to South Casemates. A nice explore, despite the graffiti, with lovely lighting. It was then time for... the pipe. A long, very small chalk cave system including an 8ft long, 40cm diameter porcelain pipe, which involved knee bashing, mound climbing, dust inhaling, body squashing, cramped crawling and a lot of laughs. North Casemates had suffered a lot less vandalism and damage, so the rooms were well worth the crawl. On the way back, I got one arm stuck down by my side, with no room to move it in front of me, meaning I had to crawl through with only one arm ahead of me, shortly followed by HitGirl almost losing her trousers. Leaving Casemates, a quick group shot was taken, before finally heading to the Grand Shaft and then to the train station for the ride home. Thanks to those that made it a great day, such a good bunch of people! Only a few assorted photos of the places we visited, as I only have a point and shoot. Nonetheless, one or two okay shots. Enjoy! 1. Z Rocket 2. Lovely gates at Hospital Postern (excuse the flash) 3. Striking graffiti and rubbel at South Casemates 4. View out from South Casemates 5. North Casemates 6. Icicles at North Casemates 7. Huge concrete block backfill at North Casemates 8. View behind of HitGirl and Kevin emerging from the pipe into the chalk cave tunnels 9. View in front of the cramped tunnels (apologise again for the flash, no time to light paint) 10. Looking up at Grand Shaft 11.Lovely Dover sunset 12. Group shot
  15. Explored with Therealindianajones and one non member
  16. Explored with Therealindianajones and one non member, Called snake River Mills because it was by a river and we found a snake lol
  17. After a mess up with directions on a saturday explore decided to go for a walk with Miss CSI on sunday and see this lovely old church, been before and love it every time I see it. Heres some history:- St.Andrew's church is a partly redundant anglican church in covehithe suffolk, it's grade I listed. Part of the church is in ruins and is under the churches conservation trust. It stands on a lane leading to the sea, which has suffered significant ongoing coastal erosion. The eldest fabric in the original large medieval church dates from the 14th century but most of it from the 15th century. During the civil war of charles 1st much of the stained glass was destroyed. By the later part of that century the large church was too expensive for the parishioners to maintain, they were given permission in 1672 to remove the roof and to build a smaller church within it. The pews were 15th Century and the pulpit is 17th century. Enjoy the pics:-
  18. visited with six riff raff and pezzar ... we arrived early Friday morning ,all keen to start working are way throught the list and cram as much into three days as possible Friday didn't quite go to plan after a few fails a trye change and run in with Belgiums finest who took are details and ask us politely to leave we then heading onto traction sud could of spent all night at this place there so much to see so defintley a revisit in order on with the pics apologies for the overkill with the fish-eye got a little carried away ... traction sud ... lightspeed ... chateau luminere... theatre jusete ... Villa Wallfhart ... thanks for looking ...
  19. Now then. Recently Maniac, Frosty and I went out for a spot of Dover derping and this is "wot we done" South trollands #1: Troll mills west: Thanks to the guys for an entertaining evening out, and thanks to you for looking in, R. Jewson
  20. I've had my eye on this for a while, looks like once they got going, they hit it hard cos now, well, its ruined. I'm going to start a campaign, Urbexorzzzz againzzzzt developerzzzzzz! HANDS OF OUR DERPS! A clip from the local news a few years ago gives the info. 'Most of the outpatient services will be moving to nearby Acre Mill along with antenatal services and back room offices. The concern is the hospital will run short of beds as the ageing population rises and hospital bosses say the move would mean they could run a more “efficient and effective� service. The plans were revealed at a Calderdale and Huddersfield NHS Trust board meeting yesterday. The Z block at Acre Mills opposite the hospital will be redesigned to integrate primary and secondary care, community and social care into more of a one-stop service. Director of service development at Calderdale and Huddersfield NHS Trust Lesley Hill said: “This plan will require quite a significant re-design but we want patient experience to improve and staff satisfaction to improve. Read more: Examiner http://www.examiner.co.uk/news/local-we ... 2NEyWW8aX' Again, no carpets, but this times we had lights, randomly placed outside lift shafts.... Anyway, visited with drinkinbud andbeardythewierdy, I wouldn't really recommend anyone else bothers LOL. Some bugger around here loves the 2 tone paint job, it's in all the mills! It had a corridor. A room. Some more rooms. One had a wheelbarrow. And a corridor on the way out. First in I think, not bloody worth it. LOL!
  21. It's grim up North! Myself, Drinkinbud and the Beardyemukidwhotagsalong went for a mooch around this mill, we've all passed, either discounted it, it was tight or more recently full of pikeys with diggers?!?!?!!? Comedy of the day involved drinkinbud complaining that he liked southern places better, electricity, carpet, warm........he is now our honorary southern softie LOL! Anyway, here's some stolen history: "The woollen mill was owned by Samuel Firth of Gatehead in Marsden, and opened in 1888. He also owned Holme Mill. By the 60s, it was owned and run by Fisher, Firth & Co. which became Cellars Clough Woollen Mills Ltd, managed by another Firth son, in 1981. The company has now been dissolved. Situated just off the Huddersfield Narrow Canal, the mill’s pond is now a popular fishing spot. Planning permission was granted for the conversion of the mills and former offices to 101 dwelling units, 9 live/work units, a resident’s gym, pool, shop, meeting room, bike store, car park and improvements to the access road. Previous planning applications have been unsuccessful as bats were found to be residing in the mill. The bats weren’t forcibly removed, so the hope was that they would eventually choose the ‘improved accommodation’ for themselves." Beardygirlpants doing his thing. Drinkinbud attempting to stare at his strongbow till it magically fills up again.. Graffreflection, just had to. At the top. My big shaft shot. It's full of big rooms. And doors. And lift shafts. HI! Also has an outside. Actually, for somewhere with very little detail, this place was great, well worth a wonder round if you can! Cheers for looking.
  22. Explored with Shush and 5 others Great day with great people
  23. Had a look at this place while in the area back in March. The cars where the main attraction for me and they did not disappoint. Excellent examples of cars left to rust and rot until they finally fall in on themselves. The rest of the site consists of stripped huts with some being more interesting and less bear than others. A relaxed and pleasant half hour. Visited with non member Paul. HISTORY Known as Prisoner of war camp 116 was built in 1941 and located in Hatfield heath, just outside Bishops Stortford. The camp mainly housed Italians until about 1943-1944 where it held German and Austrian prisoners aswell. It was known at one point the camp housed 750 prisoners The prisoners had a relatively easy lifestyle here (Unlike the English prisoners in the German POW Camps) and could do voluntary work in the near by farm land in Harlow, they were picked up by the Land Girls and each prisoner had an allotted farm where they would work at. Thanks For Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157678466406434/with/32853941973/
  24. Hello, another from my long long long list of shitty cottages I have to post up on here tp convert you to the deeply weird realm of cottaging! Found this almost my accident whilst exploring with a couple friends, after walking what felt like miles through small forests, over streams, up and down heather marsh lands and over several feilds to visit some of the shittest derps you could probably imagine, I spotted this on the way down the wild hills. We took a chance as it was on a live farm, found the door open and decided to pop in for 30 mins and grabbed some pics. We all felt a bit uneasy as it was a live farm and decided to get out quickly, just as we were closing the door a car came down the drive way, and we bolted like a mini heard of highland cows stampeding our way down the side of the house and over a few fences to safety. Never been back, but one day I will! Thanks for cuming cottaging with me
  25. ...or to give it it's proper title, the 'Holy f**king s**t this is epic' Grain Elevator. After finding the most unassuming but amazing breakfast spot ever where I ate possibly the best toasted bacon and egg breakfast sandwich I have ever eaten I knew that it was going to be a good day. This place is massive. And I mean truly MAHOOOOSIVE. The elevators at Silo City in Buffalo are the only things comparable in size to this behemoth which towers over everything in the neighbourhood. The ascent to the top floors where all the interest lies involves a dizzying, disorientating spiral staircase in a pitch black metal tube that takes you to the level above the vast silos, and then numerous staircases up to the roof - tiring stuff but the rewards are totally worth it. I soon forgot about my aching legs as once again I found myself somewhere in which I literally didn't know where to point the camera at first, everywhere I looked I saw something I needed to investigate. So here are some photos of what I saw. Thanks for looking, more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157651177326707/
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