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  1. I first had a look at this spot in 2015. Almost three years on the place has been knocked about a bit and it seemed stripped somehow from the last visit. Did not spend that long in here. As I parked up an old lady drove passed paying more attention to the my car than I liked, so I blasted round in about twenty minutes ☺️ When I came out an old chap drove passed again paying a lot of attention to myself and the car. Country Watch in full swing ☺️ Nice to see the place again but, it did appear to have lost something over the three years. Thanks for Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157669030838798/with/28272201358/
  2. Had a look at this place on a recent trip to Scotland. Very decayed and stripped this one but never the less still a nice spot for a look around. There was some lovely tiles still in place in parts of the hospital which I liked. I do like a bit of old tile work There was a lot of kids toys dotted about also which seemed strange and out of place. We almost bumped into a couple of people who turned up while we where there but, they must have heard us inside and ran off. Maybe they had mistaken our low talking for the rustle of feathers A nice relaxed explore this, for us anyway, on a nice sunny afternoon. Visited with non member Paul. Thanks for Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157694792372572/with/41878484015/
  3. Engedi Welsh Calvinistic Methodist Chapel built was built in 1842, rebuilt in 1867 and modified in 1890. The present chapel, dated 1867, is built in the Classical style of the gable entry type, to the design of architect Richard Owen of Liverpool by Evan Jones of Dolyd and cost £4579. The Classical front is of granite masonry with Penmon stone dressings and a portico. The chapel is now Grade II listed. The interior contains an octagonal pulpit and an ornate organ with classical detailing including Corinthian pilasters and swags. The raked galley is on three sides and is supported by cast iron columns with brackets and foliate capitals. The ceiling consists of 15 square panels, again very heavily decorated with classical mouldings and with ornate roses to the centre of each providing ventilation and fittings for lights. The basement has a ministers room, offices and a schoolroom. The chapel was sold at auction in April 2014 for £45,000 after having been disused for a number of years. At this time it remains disused and in a state of disrepair. One thing Wales has in abundance is abandoned chapels. They're not my kind of thing especially but as chapels go this is a pretty decent one. Andy K found this a couple of years ago and amazingly it hasn't changed a lot bar some extra pigeons and their wicked ways. Visited again with @Andy & @Miss.Anthrope. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Diolch am edrych eto
  4. History In 1781 the town of Montrose was unique among Scottish towns and cities in being the first to have an asylum for the insane. The Montrose Lunatic Asylum, Infirmary and Dispensary was completed after the institution of a subscription by local woman Mrs Susan Carnegie of Charleton, following concerns about "mad people being kept in a prison in the middle of the street". It was described as "a house and garden in the links of Montrose". It occupied the site now bounded by Barrack Road, Ferry Road and Garrison Road, approximately where the Marine Hotel and the Fire Station now stand. During these years, the main preoccupation of the managers was the considerable overcrowding in the Asylum, which among other things, made containing the not infrequent outbreaks of such diseases as cholera and smallpox very difficult. By 1853, the number of residents passed the 200 mark. As before, various additions and alterations were made to the buildings, but at one stage, even the Medical Superintendent's house on its completion was pressed into service as patient accommodation before the Superintendent could move in! Thus, inevitably, a committee was appointed in 1855 to look into the question of acquiring a site for a new Asylum, and finally decided on the lands of the farm of Sunnyside, outside the town. In 1858, Dr. James Howden was appointed Superintendent and was to remain in this post for the next 40 years. The first patients were received in the new Asylum during that year, and within two years, "the greater part of the patients were moved" to it. Inevitably, with the increased availability of accommodation, the stringent requirements for admission exercised at the old Asylum were relaxed, and in a single year (1860) the numbers rose by 30% to 373. Carnegie house, for private patients opened in 1899. A brochure describing its attractions and a brief history of the Hospital was commissioned by the Managers to mark the occasion, and was written by Mr. James Ross. A copy can be seen in Montrose Public Library. Ravenswood was now given up, but Carnegie House did not solve the continuing problems of overcrowding. Numbers reached 670 by 1900, and two "detached villas" were built in quick succession, Howden Villa being completed in 1901 and Northesk Villa in 1904. With the crisis in Europe in 1938, arrangements were made for gas proofing and sandbagging basement windows. One hundred yards of trench, 6 feet deep were dug in the field opposite the main gate. A.R.P. training was started, fire fighting appartus was overhauled, and gas masks issued. All this effort was not wasted. On the 2nd of October, 1940, five high explosive bombs fell on the Hospital. One missed the Main Building by 12 feet, breaking glass, but causing no casualties. Another hit the kitchen area of Northesk Villa, injuring two nurses. One of them, Nurse Reid, although injured herself, managed to attend to her colleague, Nurse Simpson, and then "proceeded to comfort and calm her patients". Her devotion to duty was such that Nurse Reid was recommended for a decoration, and was awarded the George Medal, the first in Scotland. As in the previous war, patients were evacuated from other Hospitals which were required by the War Office, and Montrose had once again to accommodate as many as 220 additional patients and their staff from Stirling. At a later stage, patients from Aberdeen were also accommodated, due to bomb damage at Aberdeen Asylum. The number of resident patients thus topped one thousand for the first and only time, (1052 on 12th June, 1940). Over the 30 year period from post-war to the bi-centenary, it would not be too much of an exaggeration to say that the hospital had changed as much as it did in the previous hundred. Television was introduced in time for the Coronation in 1953, and most wards had a set by 1957. Complete modernisation of most wards was carried out during the 50's and 60's, which transformed especially the Main Building wards. Open fires gave way to radiators and many side rooms were heated for the first time. The site officially closed in 2011. The explore Yet another site long overdue, so with a few clear days it was time to make the long journey north. After a few years of average asylums, Sunnyside was a very pleasant way to spend an afternoon with the North Sea winds at ease! With soil samples being taken in the grounds, hopefully the site has a future; which wont be helped by a group of kids i encountered later in the day. I cringe at the thought that one fire could bring 230 years of history to an end... 1. 2. Waiting for the tourist bus... 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Doctor's changing room. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14, 15. 16, 17. 18, 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. One from the modern(ish) villa, probably 1930's built. 24. Basement view of the main building with day room and 'cells' beyond, long used for storage. 25. 26. Infirmary. 27. Interesting club house with maintenance shed attached. Note the tree timbers supporting the porch. Thanks for looking folks!
  5. Chateau Sarco – France Built in the 19th century. Once owned by the ministry and sold in 2008 for just under 4 Million euro and abandoned ever since……
  6. La Morgue Prelude is situated on a massive hospital site. The hospital originally opened in the 1860’s, the hospital itself is still in use today but large parts of it is unused and getting renovated.
  7. The present chateau style house, the third on the site, was built for the Hughes copper mining family. The house, designed in the 1870s, was called a 'calendar house' as it had 365 rooms. It is set in walled gardens of around 18 acres, which are themselves set in grounds of around 5,000 acres, encompassing open fields, parkland and forests. The 1870s structure is an example of the myriad of new types of buildings that were arising during the Victorian era to fulfil increasingly specialised functions. For example, there was a room in the mansion that was only to be used for the ironing of newspapers, so that the ink would not come off on the reader's hands. The property was last used as a private home in 1929, after which it was converted to a 'rheuma spa', a health centre for the treatment of people with rheumatism. The spa remained until the outbreak of World War II, when the hall was taken over as a hospital. Post-war the hall became Clarendon Girls' School, but after extensive fire damage in 1975, the school was forced to close. Restored by businessman Eddie Vince as a Christian conference centre, it was sold at auction in 2001, but a proposed redevelopment by Derbyshire Investments failed to materialise. The property was to be offered for sale by auction on 12 October 2011 with a reserve price of £1.5million which did not include the 5,000 acres of surrounding land. However it was bought shortly before auction by a businessman who bid closest to the £1.5m guide price. He intended to develop the property into a hotel, but these plans never materialised, and the property lies derelict. In 2015 Kinmel Hall was identified by the Victorian Society as one of the top ten at-risk Victorian and Edwardian buildings. This has popped up a few times over the last few years and amazingly nothing much has changed since the last report in 2016. I failed here a couple of years back so it was time for round 2 with @Andy& @Miss.Anthrope. We don't take Ls baby! Renovation work appears to be taking place so there are definitely people working here during the week. The ground floor is where all the good stuff is at. Upstairs everything is pretty much stripped and empty. Anyway, I'm glad to have finally made it in here. Definitely one of the best mansions in the UK. Cheers for looking
  8. An old train repair facility. Linked with one of the big steel works in Belgium. Now all closed. Things date back to around 2012. I think it closed around this time. the place isn't a bad mooch. a few people living inside taking copper.
  9. Another short report from me, this was my second Urbex excursion so I'm keeping them short to kinda test the waters a bit before I go all out and find bigger places (or at least more interesting ones) with better equipment. I couldn't find anything about the place online but from what I gathered someone was evicted and then burglars came and stripped the place. That's just what I got from the graffiti drawn on by someone who has never attended an English class, although there are a lot of those types around here XD. Anyway, enjoy the pictures!
  10. On my way back from Belgium I stopped at Maison Kirsch at Luxemburg. #1 DSC01703-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #2 DSC01743-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #3 DSC01705-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #4 DSC01737-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #5 DSC01710-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #6 DSC01745-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #7 DSC01712-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #8 DSC01749-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #9 DSC01714-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #10 DSC01742-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #11 DSC01718-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #12 DSC01729-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #13 DSC01730-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #14 DSC01731-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #15 DSC01733-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #16 DSC01746-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #17 DSC01752-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #18 DSC01756-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
  11. The once grand Bureau Central administration building now stands decayed and rotting, but still retains nearly all of it's character. History The Bureau Central was the main offices for the de Wendel Family Metal company. The Family had been involved in metal industry since the 18th Century. By the 19th Century they were the 3rd largest iron company in Franc. In 1870 they became the largest iron company after a major furnace upgrade successfully modernised their production. During this period they employed 7000 people and were producing 112,500 tonnes of iron and 134,500 tonnes of pig iron each year. When they expanding to steelmaking, they needed a grand main office to impress customers and keep on top of their every growing enterprise, and so in 1892 Central Bureau was built. In 1926 the Bureau Central was expanded to cope with the still growing paperwork. The de Wendal iron enteprise continued to flourish until the post WW2 period where business fell into a decline. The mining industry was nationalised and eventually the whole family company was completely nationalised. Bureau Central was abandoned in the 1980's after a company merger. The building itself is listed and protected. The Explore The first attempt at Bureau Central was a bit of a fail as there was a worker cutting trees right behind the building, exactly where I needed to be. So I went off to explore a plan B (Terre Rouge) and returned a few days later on a Saturday morning when it was much quieter, and I got in with no drama this time. The building is very decayed and has been well trashed. Looking at older photos it seems its been in a bad state of decay for a number of years, and not much has changed recently. It's got 4 levels including a huge basement level. The building is pretty big, with lots of rooms, but most of them are empty and layered in collapsed ceiling material. However the grandeur, architecture and nice lighting makes it the most photogenic explore I've done for a while. The long corridors, skylights and peeling paint tick all the boxes of a good decay photo. I was there alone for a couple hours until 5 German Explorers showed up to explore it too. Turned out to be a really decent bunch too. A cracker of an explore! Photos
  12. Hi all! We decided to hit the road and head for Staines to take a look at an industrial warehouse which was still full of all the old stuff! I couldn't find much history about the place as it is very old and from what I can see dates back to 1919 so a very long time. The explore was awesome, checking out all of the old machinery in the building and having a good wonder around! Access was fairly straight forward after having a quick scout of the building but once inside we were amazed at how big this place actually was! Anyway please feel free to check the footage!
  13. Smudges 1st ever photographic report - may 2018 Smudges has been known by numerous other names over the years from The Crofters Arms Hotel to McGees to Moghuls Palace but has always retained it's charm and character. A true time capsule rotting away in the heart of Bolton. Featuring some stunning hand-carved bars and one of two of this type of revolving doors that exist the other located in a grand hotel in London. The Urban Collective We Film It... Thank you for checking out my pics guys! Clarky The Urban Collective We Film It...
  14. A early morning meet in Liverpool with @GK-WAX to try a few locations around the city that resulted in a few fails but can wait for another day. Then we decided on littlewoods.this one I have tried before with @telf and @whoopashooppa but didn't manage to get far so roll on a few years and I'm back again. Last time it was a bit of a fort knox so wasn't expecting to find a way in. Now yes it's stripped out but I enjoyed it especially up on centre tower roof on a sunny morning. So here's some history and photos. History... Architectural charity SAVE Britain’s Heritage welcomes new plans to save Liverpool’s most prominent Art Deco landmark, the huge white Littlewoods building that dominates the city’s eastern approach. Built in 1938 for Littlewoods’ famous football pools, the tall central clock tower and streamlined concrete profile are visib le far across Liverpool. The building housed the giant printing presses that sent millions of pools coupons across the country every week, to player s dreaming of winning a golden ticket. photos from SAVE Britain’s Heritage The National Lottery superseded the football pools, and the building has lain derelict for over a decade. English Heritage refused an application to list the structure and two redevelopment schemes have fallen victim to the recession. Earlier this year, local press reports warned that demolition was becoming increasingly likely as the structure fell into decline . SAVE responded by drawing national media and ministerial attention to the building’s importance , owned by the Homes and Communities Agency. SAVE P resident Marcus Binney accu sed N ational Regeneration A gencies of indifference to the building’s demonstrable architectural and historic significance. T he building was seen by sev eral million viewers when SAVE Deputy D irector Rhiannon Wicks appeared on the Alan Titchmarsh show in S eptember with Dan Snow, to highlight its plight . Now Manchester based developers Capital & Centric Plc have announced their intention s to buy the building . They are submit ting a planning application to Liverpool City Council to convert it into a hotel wi th commercial space. The new proposal, drawn up by Shedkm Architects , would see £16 million of private sector money invested in the refurbishment project , which could start on site summer 2013 . The project is thought to have won financial support from the mayoral City Deal fund. SAVE salutes the Mayor’s positive achievement in working with national government and the private sector in response to public opinion to secure the future of this important building. DSC_3040 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3066 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3065 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3064 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3063 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr url=https://flic.kr/p/JRoMB5][/url]DSC_3062 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3061 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3059 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3057 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3054 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3053 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3052 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3051 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3050 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3048 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3047 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3045 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3043 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3039 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3038 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3067 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  15. hi having finished a job fairly nearby it was time to do another one on my to do list that being clarborough railway tunnel. clarborough tunnel was built in 1850 and lies just over 2 miles from retford in nottinghamshire on the branch line of the sheffield to lincoln line which sees an hourly service between the 2 cities and occasional freight trains and is a site of special scientific intrest and houses clarborough nature reserve on top of the tunnel. proposed in 1844 and completed in 1850 by the manchester sheffield and lincoln railway ( MSLR) continues to trent junction where it joins the great northern and great eastern joint railway ( GN&GEJR) from doncaster and continues eastwards to cleethorpes via brigg and in a southerly direction to lincoln where it rejoins the east coast main line south of peterborough there was also a junction at clarborough which ran via torksey to sykes junction continuing on to lincoln and cleethorpes via market rasen this closed in 1959 but reopened in 1967 as far cottham to serve the power station all other freight traveling via gainsborough lea road . now a word of warning to would be explorers..... exploring live railway tunnels is not something to be approached lightly unlike dead tunnels they still have frequent trains running through them most are tucked out of the way and may be difficult to access but the main considerations are safety first dont do anything which would put yourself in danger and always be constantly on the look out for trains and most of all ensure you are not seen as nowadays they delay trains which incurs fines for the operator so BTP will not be sympathetic if you get caught and you may find yourself in front of the magistrate. that said clarborough tunnel is accessed fom church lane following the road for around a mile untill i found the line at cherry holt crossing on whinleys road a continuation of church lane my goal clarborough tunnel was around a quarter mile further on but not fancying playing dodge the train i parked the car at the locked crossing gates and set off on foot uphill again to find a way to the tunnel. passing cherry holt farm i attracted the attention of a rather loud doberman dog who proceded to follow me up the farmers field barking loudly being glad there was a large fence between myself and it walked in to the wood and nature reserve. following the main path through the wood i gained the nature reserve and found the ventilation shaft for the tunnel continuing on the right hand path found myself at the top of the east portal of clarborough tunnel. the next qustion was how to get down to it with a very steep bank and bushes after much probing found a gap and had to slide down the steep bank on my arse using my boots and grass as a brake eventually reaching the bottom and ensuring nothing was lurking walked towards the tunnel. an aproaching train caused me to take cover behind a retaining wall after which i spent around 20 mins photographing and deciding the best way out. not really fancying a 650 yard walk through the tunnel then a quarter mile to the crossing and not having a timetable it had to be the same way i got in but this time up the side of the tunnel bank and across the tunnel top and after much climbing got over the fence and rolled myself a fag while i regained my composure returning back through the reserve picked up a big stick lest my 4 legged friend should be around and find a way through the fence at least i,d got something to brain it with. there was no sign of the dog and thought it had gone in for its tea untill a large shape rounded the corner barking furiously yes my friend was back and continued to follow me down the field to much barking. leaving my walking stick at the crossing for someone else to use managed to grab a couple of train pictures to add to my report and another explore crossed off the list. cherry holt crossing the adventure starts here.... clarborough tunnel in the distance the signs warn engineers they are entering a site of scientific intrest and must obtain special permission to work here. the crossing access board clarborough tunnel ventilation shaft looking down from the top of the tunnel looking towards lincoln i came down the steep bank on my arse on the left first view of clarborough tunnel,s east portal from the embankment trackside safety first from here on in lantern repeater signal TN 835 (thrumpton) stands guard in the clear position at the tunnel portal clarboroughs tunnel board some nice beams in the tunnel roof that extend right through the tunnel which can be seen as they disapear into the darkness a tunnel marker looking outside the tunnel is quite wet in places a brick reccess and signal cable my reccess was cut in with a steel lintel above it blast on the roof from its steam days climbing back up the bank the top capping stones and brickwork a broken drain pipe looking down the banking at the track as a northern railbus scoots into the tunnel another view of the capping stones clarborough nature reserve is right on top of clarborough tunnel and extends the full length of the tunnel back at the crossing as 66740 and 017 top and tail a coal train from cottham power staion out of the tunnel came across these on my way back up church lane think they are something to do with the fun day ...beautifull babs windsor wallace and grommit love this one british strawberries and cream
  16. Smudges A.K.A The Crofters Arms Hotel and McGees first ever video report May 2018 The Urban Collective We Film It...
  17. Hi all, we are back already with another video! This time we had been tipped off of an abandoned Chinese resturant in Southampton and what an explore it was! It turns out that everything had been left behind although the place being slightly trashed. I couldn't find to much in regards to history of this place but I don't think it's too extensive but after looking at the reviews it seems pretty obvious why this place was closed down as it was stated as having terrible customer service and wasn't very hygenic. Hope you like the video, like always open to feedback. I am looking at getting new equipment to help with low light so please bear with me!
  18. Hi everyone! This is my footage of Battle Hospital in Reading. I visited in May 2018 and the explore went extremely well as we managed to search the entire site without any interruptions and oh my what a place to explore! A Little History The site was created in 1867 as a Workhouse which went on to be known as the Reading Union Workhouse. They added an infirmary to the site between the years of 1889 and 1892 which added the space for an extra 185 beds! Amongst the First World War it was then known as the Reading War Hospital. It was then in 1930 that it became Battle Hospital but it's not over quite yet as in 1952 they built a new maternity unit which was known as Thames Block and then in 1972 they built a new block called Abbey block so by 1993 Battle Hospital was able to accomodate 280 beds however this was not great compared to the 760 beds at Reading's other hospital, the Royal Berkshire Hospital. It was then in 2005 that Battle Hospital closed it's doors for the final time with all the patients being transferred over to the Royal Berkshire hospital in a new block which would be known as Battle block. Thanks for reading! Hopefully you found something of interest
  19. Had a great afternoon exploring here, what a place. It’s huge!! I have been meaning to visit here for years & it certainly has fallen into disrepair over the years (since I've known about the place). I should have gone years ago! Must go back on a sunny/warmer day & hopefully next time we won’t get caught by the angry farmer/security guy ?
  20. Last weekend I visited this small power station. I'm not really sure but assume that it has been part of spinning factory back in the days. A few years ago it has been used by a local blacksmith but is abandoned again. #1 DSC01402-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #2 DSC01371-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #3 DSC01367-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #4 DSC01338-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #5 DSC01347-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #6 DSC01350-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #7 DSC01351-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #8 DSC01364-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #9 DSC01359-Bearbeitet-2 by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #10 DSC01377-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #11 DSC01378-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #12 DSC01379-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #13 DSC01389-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #14 DSC01392-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #15 DSC01388-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #16 DSC01385-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #17 DSC01386-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #18 DSC01376-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #19 DSC01373-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
  21. History (GWSR.COM) Hunting Butts tunnel often gets overlooked but it is the shorter of the two tunnels on the Honeybourne Line. It has track laid through it and it is used to store rolling stock although the Cheltenham end of the tunnel is fenced off with a robust steel palisade. Hunting Butts tunnel is just 97 yards long and was originally envisaged as a deep cutting. However, this would have severed the gallops then used by the new racecourse so, perhaps with an eye on future revenue afforded by the racecourse the GWR agreed to build the tunnel and it was completed in the Autumn of 1904. Cheltenham Race Course station was completed in 1912; six years after the line had opened throughout. The Honeybourne Line was effectively closed in 1976 following a freight train derailment on what is now known as 'Chicken Curve' north of Winchcombe, probably because of movement in the embankment. This is a problem that has beset this location since the 1920s and in January 2011 finally collapsed, severing the line. No through trains traversed the route after that date and it was officially closed later November 1976. In 2010 the trackbed was replaced and is now used to store rolling stock. Pics Thanks for looking
  22. 2nd to last explore this one,happened to be along our route back toward ferry port so as Urban Junky had mentioned he popped in here when we met up at the hotel it seemed rude not to go have a look.. Seems it was some form of coal washing site from what ive been told.. There is a inscription in the wall outside and it reads.. This sorting laundry was built with the help of Credit marshall testimony of the generosity of the united states of America.. Well thats how google translates it.The site is massive big holes everywhere and brutal concrete design we spent hours wandering about shooting this place. explored with Sx-riffraff SpaceInvader Big ugly and full of angles to shoot ,so in all i loved it
  23. This was day one of our tour de la derp.. Fascinating place and many rooms full of allsorts including the basement level with the bits everyone wants to see.. Visited with sx-riffraff ,Crazy fool and spaceinvader who was having 40 winks back atthe car The horror labs is situated in a now mainly converted area so making access not as straightforward as youd like ,but access was gained none the less The light in here as many of you know or have gathered isnt great due to the small window at end of the room so its a bitch to get right Thanks for looking and no doubt i'll have a few more up during the day
  24. These are the shots that even i cant stretch to a report on each of them.. So i thought id lump them into a combined report. Uni l L'ecole Labryinth IM cooling tower One more report at some point then im done..thanks for putting up with the huge amount of reportage!
  25. Think ive got the name right,well the name people give it over there! Visited with SpaceInvader and Sx-riffraff.... Not my usual haunt but had some nice odds and sods left behind if a little hard to photograph what with the lack of room so heres a small selection of the pics i took! thanks for looking
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