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Found 59 results

  1. Some of you may have already seen this one. This is a nice paper mill closed down almost a decade ago. There are many photos of this place when it was still active, and some of them were taken when the factory had been occupied by workers right after the closure... It's a rather good place still today, despite the amount of copper thieves who came here. There are still some interesting things such as the power station (probably the best part), the semi-active substation, some laboratories and archives... We also found a small container where a radioactive substance called thorium nitrate used to be stored. You can look at all my photos here: https://flic.kr/s/aHskQESLot
  2. A building used by a payroll clerk & security guards, I believe that it was left sometime in the 80s. There wasn't much, but I found many passes and cards dated from 1940 on the floor. You can see some of the time card slots used by employees and manufactured by IBM.
  3. Swan Meadow Mill was built by James Eckersley in 1827 and became Old Mill when a new, larger mill was built in 1838. It was demolished in 1960 followed in 1963 by the larger mill. James Eckersley and Sons had three four-storey mills by 1880.Musgraves of Bolton supplied a tandem compound steam engine in 1884.Eckersleys ran six spinning mills and two weaving sheds in the town, Swan Meadow Old, Swan Meadow large, Water Heyes, and Western Mills No.1, No.2 and No.3. The mills housed a total of 236,572 ring spindles, 14,554 mule spindles and 1687 loom. It's a massive complex and there just seems to be mills everywhere here. Deffo loads more to see and more look disused. We just ran out of time to check the rest out. Visited with @Ferret The damp derpier mills most recent use looks to have been a motorbike\scooter garage. The larger mill was used as a multi level go kart track and then more recently airsoft and paintball. Not a bad mill to be fair. Had a good laugh messing about on a kids go kart. The engine house is a B E A UT.
  4. Built circa 1880 for T & J Leigh Cotton & Wool spinning, it had 120,000 spindles in 1914. Twin six storey brick built with an ornamental engine house between. Fireproof construction and cast iron pillars between windows on the top floor. It was Grade II listed in 1975. The building has had it’s various uses over the past few decades. A large section was a furniture shop. A bed and Sofa shop. A gym, joinery workshop. Until recently where it is now currently being stripped to be converted to apartments. Been in here a few times now, when it was open for summer roof chills, and more recently now it’s stripped. I’ll keep checking on it as it’s local and I really want to see the engine house but it seems to be quite secure. Anyway it’s still a grand old mill so here’s a few pictures.
  5. History: A blast furnace is an installation that makes steel from iron ore and coke, this happens at a temperature of around 2400 degrees Celsius. When there is quick liquid in the oven, one is drilled open and the steel flows out Steel production and further activities in this area stopped in 2011. Which brings an end to the more than 200-year-old steel production in Liège HFB by Hooismans, on Flickr Blast Furnace by Hooismans, on Flickr Blast Furnace by Hooismans, on Flickr HFB by Hooismans, on Flickr Laboratory by Hooismans, on Flickr Laboratory by Hooismans, on Flickr The house by Hooismans, on Flickr I also made a documentary on this place where i tell about the history of this place and how this factory worked in his heyday It is in dutch but it has subtitles Thanks for looking through!
  6. Not done a report for a while and I have quite a backlog. I always think it's good to see places whether they've been done or not just to see how they're getting on. So I'll start working my way through them as and when I can be arsed. First up. Warwick Mill, Middleton, Jan 19 Can’t really find too much out about this one other Grade II listed. The mill was built in 1907 built from red brick with a cast iron frame. It’s most recent uses were as an airsoft centre on a few of the upper levels a few pallets and bits of netting remain each floor is littered in millions of bb’s, which make for some comedy cartoon slips. Half of the ground floor looked like it was used as a tool or DIY sort of shop going off the melted remains of product stands. The rest of the ground floor that was untouched by fire used to be a small community centre. As far as mills go it’s your pretty standard big brick mill. Pretty stripped, but still some nice features to have a nosey at. The rope race is still here and is good to see. The engine room has been bricked up at the rope race and a lift installed. The engine room, as a lot have, has been used as a loading bay and was full of flooring tiles. Still has the original tiling in place though. The were plans approved to convert it into a trading hub but it’s a few years back now so that idea is probably dead in the water. More info below: https://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/business/property/middleton-mill-become-50m-global-10583740 Pics Start off with a couple of old photo’s from Library archives
  7. Shot back in January; this explore formed part of a Northern Roadtrip with @Mookster. We had previously tried and failed at this place some time ago. It was nice to finally get inside this. We had several fails this weekend; but this was one of our successes. Slaithwaite had several local manufacturers in its local area; whom joined forces in 1887 to create the Globe Worsted Company; a textiles firm. They started out by building a large mill, which was typical of the era. The Globe Worsted Mills were built in two stages. The building of the first, Globe 1 began straight away in 1887 and was completed by the following year. It is thought that Glove 1 was built to a design possibly drawn up by local architect Thomas Varley of Slaithwaite. Globe 1 was 5 stories high and consisted of 33 bays. By 1889; the second phase, Globe 2 was built on the opposite side of the road; with an overhead walkway connecting the two buildings. Globe 2 was slightly different and had 5 stories plus a basement, and had 15 bays. The Globe Worsted company continued from strength to strength over the years, and like many other textile mills; it saw a gradual decline in trade towards the end of the 20th century. The company went into administration in 2004 and the mill closed later that year. The site has been sold to a private developer and a £30 million project is progress to renovate the buildings into a multi-use complex of public and business facilities. The chimney has been demolished as part of the works. Globe Mill 1 is slowly being converted into a pretty stunning looking development; hopefully this mill will follow in its footsteps. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157676959136467
  8. Whitley Bridge Mill was originally built in 1870s by John and Thomas Croysdale. Powered by electricity and steam, the mill utilised roller milling, a technique that had revolutionised the flour industry. For more than 100 years the mill was owned by James Bowman & Sons Ltd. Bowmans ceased operations at the mill in 2016 after making the decision to move away from flour milling, and the mill was subsequently closed. Much of the machinery and equipment had been sold at auction, and extensive damaged caused to the building during the removal of the equipment. However enough remained to make this an interesting visit. The building is like a maze, and we kept find more and more bits every time we thought we'd covered the entire place. Visited with @The Amateur Wanderer. Archive image of the mill The mill as it stands today Autoroller roller mills More roller mills The roller mills were the main machinery in the flour milling process One of the few remaining original windows, although now with a metal sheet covering The laboratory was quite interesting Note the Bowmans logo used to form a pattern in the tiles Rear exterior and silos Fuel pumps
  9. (Image Heavy) Browns Island is located on a river in the Midwest, the island has a long, interesting history. It was noted by George Washington during his travels, and Meriwether Lewis from the Lewis and Clark Expedition camped there in 1803, on the site there's an ancient Native mound, and early petroglyphs existed on the head of the island. For around 100 years the island was privately owned and farmed until 1957, when a steel company bought it to build a coke plant. There was also a mail plane crash on the island in 1933 that killed the pilot and passenger. In Dec of 1972, right before the Coke Ovens started operating, there was a gas explosion which killed 21 construction workers, the oven were operational until 1982, eventually, they were demolished and the island sold slag for commercial use until 2008. Although there were no ovens standing, it was still an interesting explore, my neighbor and grandfather worked here when the Mill used it. I was very fortunate to get permission to go on it
  10. History Pinched from other reports on here: Milford was named for its river-crossing, on an ancient route from Derby to the Peak district. Jedediah Strutt, a farmer turned hosier, recognised the potential of the site. The Inventor of the Derby rib machine, Strutt owned a Derby silk mill, and had set up cotton mills in Belper. In 1781, he bought land in Milford to build a cotton spinning mill. It was one of a series of textile milles constructed on the Derwent between Matlock and Derby during the Industrial Revolution. These pioneering developments, which included the creation of new communities to house and cater for the workforce they required, are now recognises as being of international importance. The Milford Mill complex eventually included spinning, bleaching and dying mills, as well as foundries, joiners’ workshops, a gas-works and a corn-mill. The Warehouse, constructed in 1793, was an early attempt by William Strutt, Jedediah’s eldest son, to design a fire-proof multi-storey structure. The Strutt's success transformed Milford from a riverside hamlet into a company village. They built a school, created several farms to supply produce for their workers and helped establish the village’s various religious and social buildings. The remaining buildings are just fragments of a much larger site, mostly demolished through the 1960s and 1970s. More recently the site had been mixed industrial/commercial units, with part of the site forming an antique centre. Currently it sits empty with the forecourt used as a car wash on weekends. The Explore Generally I write something along the lines of things being a 'relaxed mooch' in this section. Having initially headed to Derwentside Industrial Park to see what was left of the Abru factory (A: Lots of rubble) I I had a fairly clumsy entrance over some barbed wire at Milford in full view of the adjacent A-road. Cut my hands and shredded my jeans a little but nothing too disastrous. Inside it's all pretty heavily graffed and stripped. Not sure I'd go so far out of my way to go back. After wandering around for an hour it becomes apparent that there are other people on the site. Given my ungraceful entrance I assumed it was security. Cue a 45 minute game of hide and seek. Transpires there are six people congregated in front of the gate. The site is encircled by a river so there are no alternative avenues of escape. After waiting and watching for a further half hour my patience fails and I decide to approach. Turns out one of the blokes was (I assume) an estate agent. THe look on his face when I, the scruffy, unshaven bloke with ripped clothes and hands covered in blood and rust came towards him was priceless. He was polite but asked me to leave immediately and I walk purposefully towards the gate. I try to open it for the most awkward couple of minutes of my life before an exasperated security guard has to walk over and do it for me. All in all not my smoothest moment. The Photos I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. If you're anywhere vaguely near Sheffield and want to link up then drop me a line. Cheers, Thirteen.
  11. I first had a look at this spot in 2015. Almost three years on the place has been knocked about a bit and it seemed stripped somehow from the last visit. Did not spend that long in here. As I parked up an old lady drove passed paying more attention to the my car than I liked, so I blasted round in about twenty minutes ☺️ When I came out an old chap drove passed again paying a lot of attention to myself and the car. Country Watch in full swing ☺️ Nice to see the place again but, it did appear to have lost something over the three years. Thanks for Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157669030838798/with/28272201358/
  12. One of my favorite sites, I just love this building with its stunning wood structure, shame the vandals keep try to torch it!
  13. Visited back in Early Feb with Mookster and an American Explorer friend, who is over on an educational placement. We had quite a Northern Road Trip planned; with around 18 sites on our list, but sadly did about 4 or 5 over two days. Annoying but that's the nature of this beast! Cellars Clough Mill was originally owned by Samuel Firth of Gatehead in Marsden, and opened in 1888. Sam also owned Holme Mill. By the 60s, it was owned and run by company Fisher, Firth & Co. which named the mill "Cellars Clough Woollen Mills Ltd", managed by another Firth son, in 1981. The company has since been dissolved and the mill is believed to have closed in the 80s. Previous planning applications have been unsuccessful because it was discovered that bats were found to be residing insude mill. The bats cannot be forcibly removed, so the hope was that they would eventually move on. Wings of the mill have been demolished; presumably to let nature in and destroy the mill? #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157692916601562
  14. Another one of our February Nothern Road Trip with Mookster, our American friend and myself. A bit of a strange one this. An old mill, but vastly converted for commercial use and modernised. Massively decayed in places. There isn't much early history on the mill building itself; but it has been extended over the years to accommodate the increasingly expanding business Dronsfield Mercedes until its closure in around 2009. The building has workshop areas, storage areas, offices and also a living quarters. Dronsfields Mercedes are the largest independent Mercedes car & commercial vehicle specialist in Europe. A Saddleworth based company based at Wall Hill Mill. This family run business has over 30 years experience in the industry. The Dobcross site covers 8 acres, which means the company were able to fully fulfil customers requirements directly from under one roof while on the site. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157694322755981
  15. Hi and happy new year! Here’s a short video of a recent explore of Healey Mills marshalling Yard and Dudfleet mill - thanks for watching!
  16. Dobroyd mill The history Dobroyd Mills was built in 1829. A fine cloth manufacturer Dobroyd Ltd was founded at the mill in 1919. The mill closed in 1974, but was re-opened in 1976 under John Woodhead Ltd spinners. It currently houses several businesses including a classic car restoration firm and tea rooms. The future of Dobroyd Mills became a subject of debate when the current owners Z Hinchliffe began reducing the height of the chimney last year (2011). Concerned neighbours referred Dobroyd Mill to the English Heritage when the works began. But an inspector from English Heritage decided the Mill was not suitable for the list of buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest. Planning permission to knock down two sections on the northern end of the complex was granted by Kirklees Council last month (2012). The stone structures were deemed unsuitable for modern use. The explore The Mill resides in pleasant surroundings with parts rented to a few small businesses including a quaint tea room... doing some rather unorthodox rambling to the bemusement of nearby dog walkers we eventually arrived at the Mill. The Mill sits on top of a stream and in it's surrounding offers some peace from modern living. The exterior is generally in good condition with little sign of vandalism... The Mill stretches over some 4.04 hectares and took just over an hour to explore. Theres a few original features scattered around including some pretty heavy duty scales ... eleswhere empty rooms which bizarrely looked like they had just received their annual spring clean. looks like 'Love 37' and 'CarrotBoy' have done a few jobs here too. The pics
  17. Hope the photo file sizes are good as I had to reduce them due to the cap. Brockmill first began operations around the mid-1700s and further expanded when the Earl of Balcarres bought the mill and built a furnace at Haigh foundry half a mile downstream. The two sights prospered building large steam cylinders and fire engines also building the first locomotive for Lancashire, and plenty more to follow. Later the mill expanded into brick and textile making, however, the works closed in 1885 more recently the mill was used for the production of herbal medicine Unfortunately, i found no date as to when production stopped I'm sure you'll agree though guy's it's a wonderful explore in a serene location.
  18. The beautiful post-apocalyptic page field mill - Video Report
  19. Rylands Mill - Pagefield College campus - Video Report - Feb 2018 I must admit guys this place is one of my favorite explores up to now, from researching the history to seeing just how dilapidated it has become. It truly was a marvel for the eyes. Rylans mill or page field as it was later known, was built for Manchester's first millionaire John Rylands in 1866/7. The mill was later taken over by Wigan technological college and became known as Pagefield campus. There have been numerous fires on the premises since its closure sadly destroying some of the remaining beauty of the place, but also creating a different kind at the same time. There was also a network of bunkers below the mill which had unfortunately been sealed off due to the danger to the local youth. Hope this video report meets the standards for the sight, any feedback greatly appreciated as I just want to share my experiences with you guys not start selling caps and tee shirts and begging you to subscribe thanks.
  20. Pagefield mill - photographic report - Feb 2018 I must admit guys this place is one of my favorite explores up to now, from researching the history to seeing just how dilapidated it has become. It truly was a marvel for the eyes. Rylans mill or page field as it was later known, was built for Manchester's first millionaire John Rylands in 1866/7. The mill was later taken over by Wigan technological college and became known as Pagefield campus. There have been numerous fires on the premises since its closure sadly destroying some of the remaining beauty of the place, but also creating a different kind at the same time. There was also a network of bunkers below the mill which had unfortunately been sealed off due to the danger to the local youth. Any feedback greatly appreciated thanks.
  21. Brock Mill video and photographic reports - 5/2/2018 A quality explore that we really enjoyed. Not the most architecturally stunning but still there's a certain beauty about decay.
  22. I am a filmmaker and YouTuber, and i'm trying to get into Urbex. I really enjoy finding out about the history of the sites that i want to visit and exploring them with my son. Last week we visited a site in West Yorkshire. The site is an old fur fabrics mill and has been covered before on this forum. This is a first attempt at Urbex, so go easy on me! Exploring local abandoned mill in a cinematic style. Dudfleet Mills (Abandoned) - URBEX - Urban Exploration - DJI Spark Footage - Cinematic Edit
  23. History The woollen mill was owned by Samuel Firth of Gatehead in Marsden, and opened in 1888. He also owned Holme Mill. By the 1960s, it was owned and run by Fisher, Firth & Co. which became Cellars Clough Woollen Mills Ltd, managed by another Firth son, in 1981. The company has now been dissolved. Situated just off the Huddersfield Narrow Canal, the mill’s pond is now a very popular fishing spot. Planning permission was granted for the conversion of the mills and former offices to 101 dwelling units, 9 live/work units, a resident’s gym, pool, shop, meeting room, bike store, car park and improvements to the access road. Previous planning applications have been unsuccessful as bats were found to be residing in the mill. The bats weren’t forcibly removed, so the hope was that they would eventually choose the ‘improved accommodation’ for themselves. Explore We decided to spend a day in Huddersfield looking at some of the heritage of the town... so we ended up in Marsden which is to the east of the town we came across two mill Cellars Clough and Bottoms Mill.. unfortunately we couldn't find a way in Bottoms Mill so instead explored Cellars.. It looks like some work was carried out some years back as part of the mill is demolished with brick piled around in the courtyard. The Mill is in poor condition and its difficult to access the upper floors due to both staircases been blocked by stone rubble although we did manage to climb the staircases the floors look ready to collapse at anytime.. at the top floor theres a ladder to enter what looked liked an office although we did not attempt the climb ... overall worth a look if not for the explore it offers an insight into how mills were constructed and the size of these is truly astounding .. Pics Bad video pics The mill is in a sorry state in 2018 But there is still some nice pics to be had in there...
  24. History Barbour Mill has a long and prestigious history in Lisburn and as the end of an era draws near many local people will be recalling their own memories of Barbour Threads. In 1784 John Barbour, who hailed from Scotland, established a linen thread works in Lisburn. At the same time his son, William, bought a derelict bleach green at Hilden and set up business. Later, the thread works were transferred to Hilden and as early as 1817 it was employing 122 workers. In 1823 William Barbour bought a former bleach mill at Hilden and built a water-powered twisting mill. The Linen Thread Company was founded 1898 and it quickly became a large international company. In fact it became the largest linen thread mill in the world, giving Lisburn a richly deserved international reputation. By 1914 it employed about 2,000 people and until recently some 300 workers were still employed there, with the work- force dropping to just 85 in recent years. Among the company's varied products were nets, which could be made into snares and fishing nets. The company built a model village for its workforce in Hilden, which consisted of 350 houses, two schools, a community hall, children's playground and village sports ground. Lisburn became the envy of the world thanks to its Linen and Thread industry and now the last remnant of that history is to close its doors for the last time. The Explore Although I think we were about 6 years too late with this one. This was somewhere I have wanted to go for quite some time but with other commitments and other places to explore while in NI it always got shoved to the back seat. This trip we finally got to go, explored with @hamtagger we had quite a leisurely stroll round this one. The first thing I noticed when getting close was how it was becoming crowded with new housing and developments. Still, it sits proud within its place. A bit of the site has already been demolished. The place is bloody massive! It is easiest the biggest site I have been to. Spending numerous hours there and still not getting around the whole site led us to leave before darkness fell. The architecture was pretty impressive with the stonework and iron gables or whatever you call them. Surprisingly, despite being closed several years and falling victim to vandalism, graffiti & metal theft it still has so much to offer. There were little cupboards dotted about in most sections with linen/ thread materials. Loads of hand painted signs that were of little importance but I like stuff like that. The decay was pretty cool and I loved how trees were growing out of the top floors. Nature really was reclaiming it. A few of the ceilings had fallen in with those areas a bit more decayed than others. Right on to the pics The whole site (not my pic) Some old advertising material I found online 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 (I swear this hasn't been edited at all!) 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Thanks for looking!
  25. It's grim up North! Myself, Drinkinbud and the Beardyemukidwhotagsalong went for a mooch around this mill, we've all passed, either discounted it, it was tight or more recently full of pikeys with diggers?!?!?!!? Comedy of the day involved drinkinbud complaining that he liked southern places better, electricity, carpet, warm........he is now our honorary southern softie LOL! Anyway, here's some stolen history: "The woollen mill was owned by Samuel Firth of Gatehead in Marsden, and opened in 1888. He also owned Holme Mill. By the 60s, it was owned and run by Fisher, Firth & Co. which became Cellars Clough Woollen Mills Ltd, managed by another Firth son, in 1981. The company has now been dissolved. Situated just off the Huddersfield Narrow Canal, the mill’s pond is now a popular fishing spot. Planning permission was granted for the conversion of the mills and former offices to 101 dwelling units, 9 live/work units, a resident’s gym, pool, shop, meeting room, bike store, car park and improvements to the access road. Previous planning applications have been unsuccessful as bats were found to be residing in the mill. The bats weren’t forcibly removed, so the hope was that they would eventually choose the ‘improved accommodation’ for themselves." Beardygirlpants doing his thing. Drinkinbud attempting to stare at his strongbow till it magically fills up again.. Graffreflection, just had to. At the top. My big shaft shot. It's full of big rooms. And doors. And lift shafts. HI! Also has an outside. Actually, for somewhere with very little detail, this place was great, well worth a wonder round if you can! Cheers for looking.
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