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  1. A night in the Paris Metro My first report for a while and I felt that my photos from each location wouldn't create a substantial enough report. Because of this I decided to compile them into a more lengthy post documenting the night in which we explored various sections of the Paris Metro. I hope you enjoy reading my story and seeing the images I managed to capture. After arriving in Paris with @Letchbo for a short weekend break, we decided to begin our night of exploring by hitting a classic metro spot. Once we'd safely entered the area we wanted to photograph, we hid in an alcove for a short period of time. Patiently waiting for the end of service with front row seats to watch the last remaining trains hurl past us. As soon the service concluded for the night, we eagerly got our cameras out and started shooting. Fortunately we managed to grab a couple of decent photos before we heard what we presumed were track workers approaching nearby. We quickly concluded it was best to abort mission and keep moving ahead. Photographing sections of track as we progressed down the line, until we reached the next station and swiftly departed unnoticed. By the time we were back out above ground the night was still young and we headed onto our next location. View of a train passing on Line 10 The double raccord We'd visited this spot earlier in the year along with @Conrad and @DirtyJigsaw after visiting another of Paris' famous ghost stations. But when we arrived at this one, we noticed a large number workers across the tracks and decided to give it a miss. Fast forward to October, we thought try our luck again. My partner made his way over the fence but as I was about to climb in and join him, someone abruptly stopped me in my tracks. "Bonsoir!" "Bonsoir?" The rather authoritative looking chap approached me and continued speaking to me in French (to which I didn't fully understand.) I politely explained we were English. He then proceeded to pull a badge out and clearly stated to me the word every urban explorer wants to hear on a night out exploring the metro. "Police." Oh fuck. That's when we thought the night had sadly come to a prompt conclusion. Fortunately for us after a brief discussion with us claiming to be photographing the canal, he decided to allow us to resume our business and once he was well out of sight we made our way straight in. Onto a bit of history, Arsenal station was officially opened in 1906 and is located in the 4th arrondissement of Paris. In addition to this, it is also situated on line 5 between the Bastille and Quai de la Rapée stations. After 33 years of operation, it was closed in 1939 at the start of the Second World War. This was due to French resistance members allocating the area as an ammunition depot. Once Paris had been liberated from German forces August of 1944, a battle more commonly known as Battle for Paris and Belgium. It was decided reopening Arsenal would be inefficient. This was on account of its close proximity to neighbouring stations which limited the flow of passengers. For 75 years the station has been largely abandoned aside from graffers, urban explorers, photographers and avid thrill seekers, such as ourselves. Once we'd grabbed a few shots of the abandoned Arsenal Station, we continued photographing another small section of track further down the line. It was quite photogenic and was a welcomed bonus to what had already been a predominately successful night for the both of us. Before long the morning was fast approaching, coinciding with the threat of the service resuming. We reluctantly called it a night, making our way out and back to our accommodation, covered in metro dust and feeling pretty relieved we managed to pull it all off after a few close encounters. As always if you got this far, thanks for reading
  2. I have never been happy with the results of my expolration but nevertheless it was one of my absolute favorites. This outstanding piece of Brutalism architecture placed in the phenomenal surrounding of the beautiful historical city. PORN!
  3. Tkvarcelli was an important coal mining town in the war torn region of Abkhazia, a de facto independent republic which remains internationally recognised as part of Georgia. During the Abkhazian war (from 1992 to 93), Tkvarcheli withstood, through Russian humanitarian and military aid, an uneasy siege by the Georgian forces. As a result of the war the town's industries all but stopped and its population has since decreased from approximately 22,000 to just 5,000 people. Abkhazia is on the list of places where the FCO (Foreign & Commonwealth Office) advises against all travel. There is no UK consulate support if anything goes wrong so if you were to lose your passport for example, you'd be pretty fucked. With that in mind, and having read a few horror stories of tourists being aggressively robbed around Tkvarcelli, we were pretty skeptical about coming here. Thanks to some advice from @Olkka, who visited earlier in the year, we chose to hire a driver who knew the area well and we didn't encounter any problems. Top tip of the day - take a bottle of vodka for the guys demolishing the power plant and you'll be reet. Tkvarcelli power plant has seen better days. On the upper levels there were holes in the floor everywhere, hidden by overgrown plants and moss. We tried to be extra careful although it was difficult to tell if any structure we were standing on was safe. There were workers actively demolishing the roof above one end of the plant as well so we had to stick to the opposite end. Thankfully that's where all the good stuff was. The only other obstacle was the squatters but they didn't seem to mind us being there. Workers were sporadically dropping huge sections of roof onto the ground from above Much has been dismantled The Squatters Manoeuvring around this building was so sketchy These stairs were clinging on by dear life. We went up these but the stairs above were completely mangled Nope Coal conveyor chute Control Room. Pretty battered but I loved it in here The central turbine. I may have got a bit carried away photographing this. It would be amazing to have seen this in its hey day. Akarmara was a nearby mining town. Wars and economic change have emptied the town of the 5,000 people who lived there in the 1970s leaving it pretty much a ghost town. Now it is estimated only 35 people remain. It's completely cut off except for a rocky road full of potholes that takes around an hour to navigate. On our arrival we were greeted by some strange looks from the elderly locals, although the local children seemed fascinated by us and one accompanied us for our whole time there. It's a very surreal place where buildings that have a light outside signify that they are lived in. This is to ward off any looters. None of the buildings look lived in otherwise as they are all falling apart. The train station has been completely reclaimed by the forest. This building was completely trashed except for one flat in the middle inhabited by a young family. Thanks for looking.
  4. Tskaltubo was a popular spa resort, famous for its healing mineral waters and radon bath treatments. The first sanatoriums with in-patient facilities were built in 1925 and in 1931 Tskaltubo was designated as a spa resort by the Soviet government. Under the communist regime, a spa break was a prescribed, and mostly compulsory, annual respite, as the “right to rest” was inscribed in the Russian constitution. A visit to the doctors could result in being dispatched to somewhere like Lithuania or Georgia where spa towns were renowned for the healing properties of their mineral waters. It was one of Stalin’s favourite vacation spots. During WWII, the hotels were used as hospitals but after the war, their popularity increased and by the 1980s Tskaltubo was one of the most sought-after tourist destinations in the Soviet Union. Georgia’s independence in 1991 and the fall of the Soviet Union in late December 1991, signalled the collapse of Tskaltubo’s spa industry. Without guests, most of the hotels and resorts were forced to close their doors. Today many of them are home to refugees who fled the conflict in Abkhazia in 92/93 and needed to be rehoused. This one however has been fenced off and remains empty behind a fence with 24 hour security patrols. Apparently it was bought by a local millionaire who has plans to turn it into a luxury hotel although those plans appear to have stalled. I was a bit nervous about this one as we'd seen security the night before and they looked like regular police. The signs on the fence suggested they were 'security police' and their website claims they operate under the control of the Ministry of Internal Affairs of Georgia. We very nearly had a run in with one of them patrolling but managed to make a quick getaway thankfully. I really enjoyed it in here. We'd not seen any internal pictures so it was a proper treat to discover what was inside. The theatre was absolutely stunning. Visited with Elliot5200 on what was a great trip to a fascinating country! Thanks for looking.
  5. AMAZING explore. It looks like the owners had started packing up then decided to leave it - her whole life is just left, medication, money, credit cards, glasses, clothes, hundreds of books, electricity still on after 8years !!! Beautiful house with so much history - little gem
  6. The abattoir opened in 1960 and closed in early 2017. They opened up a new abattoir which can slaughter over 2 million pigs a year. This site will now be demolished for 100 houses, which is a relief to local residents who wanted the abattoir closed.
  7. Abandoned shop and home - This place has been abandoned for some time right in the middle of a village, sorry I'm unable to give much more information as these next two posts I have promised not to give out the locations to preserve the site and I would not want to jeopardize my source as I respect them too much to be disrespectful.
  8. Gagra is a seaside resort in Abkhazia, a de facto republic in northwestern Georgia. It used to be a popular holiday destination until the Georgian-Abkhazian conflict broke out in 1992. Like much of Abkhazia, it has since become a shadow of its former self. The beaches are quiet and hundreds of its buildings lie abandoned, including this former sanatorium turned hotel, which we spotted looking overgrown on google maps. On our approach we saw what looked like a grand palace and thought we must have the wrong building, but sure enough it was the right one and turned out to be a bit of a stunner. Having looked online since we are by no means the first to visit here, and it even has a few reviews on trip advisor! Visited with elliot5200. I may have got a bit carried away with photos of this entrance hall The floor above Not a bad view from the balcony The back of the building was in worse condition I could have spent longer in here but we had other stuff to see. Much of the town is abandoned, and indeed much of Abkhazia. Thanks for looking.
  9. Océade was an indoor waterpark in Brussels, Belgium and the largest of its kind in the Brussels Capital Region. Originally part of a 3 park franchise, the other 2 parks located in France, it was the only park to remain in business after the French divisions closed. Running at a loss, the park was acquired by the Walibi Group in 1992, with management experience built up through Aqualibi near Wavre just south of Brussels. The park has continuously expanded and been renovated, and was the Belgian leader for water slides, with 14 slides in the park. Most notably, the Hurricane is record holder for the fastest European slide (average speed 40 km/h), and the Barracuda is the longest duo slide in Belgium. With over 240 000 visitors per year and a combined volume of 1 800 m³ of water, Océade was a major leisure attraction in the Brussels Capital Region. In 2016, the Brussels city council announced Océade would be forced to close to make space for its NEO project, a redevelopment project envisioning the replacement of most of Bruparck (including Kinepolis and Océade) on the Heysel Plateau with a shopping district and residential area. Under public protest, closure was repeatedly postponed, and the final closing date was 30 September 2018. All the slides and equipment have been bought by a Romanian water park and are currently getting dismantled and re-located. The photos were taken with my mobile phone, reason being, i was on the beer and the access was a little tricky with alarms going off.... So i wanted to get in and out quickly! ?
  10. The main Hartwood Hospital building block with central towers with side wings was designed and built from 1890 by the local architect J L Murray from Biggar as the Lanark District Asylum covering the Lanarkshire area. The hospital closed in 1999
  11. History Margaret Beaven School is a grade II-listed building that was built in 1885 and was designed by Francis Doyle. The house was originally called Eddesbury, it was supposedly the last sustainable Victorian house that was built in West Derby. It was once occupied by Danson Cunningham a friend of Margaret Beaven who was Liverpool's first woman lord mayor. Since the school shut down 13 years ago, the building has been used for filming purposes. It was reported that in May 2018, there was a large fire that ripped throughout the building, we don't know which parts of the building have been damaged as we have not been back since. Our Visit After driving past this place a few times previous to our visit, we decided to have a look online to see if anyone had visited the site before us and unfortunately we came up empty-handed. After realizing this, we took it upon our selves to go down and try gain access, it took us 3 visits before we finally found an entry point. The access point was hard to get through as it was awkward and a tight squeeze. The front part of the building is boarded up and is alarmed, we did manage to gain access but the alarm was unbearable so we decided to just leave it. Once we left, we hung around to see if someone would show up and they did. Overall, the explore was well worth it even though we didn't stay to get pictures of the main building.
  12. On the outskirts of Fishburn lies the derelict Winterton hospital. Winterton hospital used to be very big however most of its buildings were demolished and this part is the only building that remains of it. All of the windows are boarded up however when we got there it looked like someone had pulled the entire doorway off causing the whole thing to open making an entry so easy. Inside the building is in terrible condition, (similar to St. peter's) with collapsed floors, wallpaper peeling, water damage etc. We also didn't realise at the time that the building had asbestos but luckily we had masks so make sure to bring one if you're planning on going inside. We were unable to access the top floor due to the floor being so bad so we only got photos from the corridor as we came up the stairs. That all being said, winterton hospital does have a lot of history and it is a shame to see it left in such a poor state.
  13. Just off the A66 in Darlington, there is an abandoned farm called Little Burdon farm, it has been derelict for at least a decade. It consists of different buildings being from a farmhouse to old barns or stables. There's really two farmhouses, a red brick one and a more modern white house. It also looks like some refurbishment/demolition has taken place but again has been held off or abandoned. The farm was built around the 1830s and is grade 2 listed. There is no security here and is easy to get into all of the buildings. That being said the buildings are indeed derelict so some floors are dangerous and can't be accessed. In the white house building, part of the upstairs floor has been removed due to the refurbishment works but has been left standing as it is. It also looks like the rooms have been stripped out and all electrics and gas pipes have been removed.
  14. Mineral Springs Bath House The construction of the Mineral Springs Bath House began in 1907. This was in order to bring in more tourism and wealth into the area. The town it was built in was an excellent location to host a bath house, as it was well known for it's rich mineral water sources which was believed to have medicinal properties. During the start of the 20th century mineral baths were a very fashionable and popular leisure activity. It took 3 years to build, with the help of local residents and neighbouring villages. It was finally unveiled with a ceremony in 1911. The materials which were used for the interior were designed in Vienna, France and Belgium and it was the most expensive healing bath in Bulgaria at that current time. Typical to most bath houses, it was separated into two sections, one for the men and another for the women. Both areas accommodated for it's visitors with a large circular pool, changing rooms and 10 bathtubs. The baths also provided central heating facilities, the main parts of the building were kept consistently at 15°C, the changing rooms at 28°C and the baths themselves were 32°C. The bath house was also equip with a clinic, admin offices and a large laundry room. Sadly the Mineral Springs Baths eventually closed in 2001, due to the decline in interest and popularity along with the lack of investment by the local government. Externals Internals If you've got this far, thanks for reading
  15. Alright , wanted to do this for some time so when the chance came up i jumped to it ,visited with Chris x ... Access is some what sketchy as i found out when we were leaving , a 7 foot fall from loose extraction pipes lol soon brought me down to the ground . This place has been signed over to developers so won't be around much longer , on with the pics 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. Cheers for looking Oldskool
  16. History The Waterloo Tunnel is a 779 metre (852 yards) long disused railway tunnel in Liverpool. It opened in 1849. At its Eastern end, the Waterloo Tunnel opens into a short cutting (approximately 63 metres long) which connects to the Victoria Tunnel which is 1.536 miles (2.474 kilometres) long. Effectively, both tunnels are one long tunnel with an open-air ventilation cutting in between; however, they were given different names initially because trains in the Waterloo Tunnel were locomotive hauled while trains in the Victoria Tunnel were cable hauled. In terms of tunnel architecture, the Waterloo Tunnel features a semi-circular opening, wide enough to accommodate three separate tracks. The westernmost section has been backfilled and there are occasional accumulations of calcite on the brickwork. Most of the Waterloo Tunnel is brick-lined; however, it is not listed. The Victoria Tunnel, on the other hand, is Grade II listed. It features a rusticated arch flanked by buttresses, together with a modillioned cornice and ashlar-coped parapet. The first two-hundred yards of the tunnel are brick-arched, but after that it is unlined up to the fourth ventilation shaft. There are five visible air shafts in the Victoria Tunnel, and an additional five hidden shafts. A drain also runs down the length of the tunnel, but this has collapsed in certain places. Both tunnels were constructed because the city of Liverpool is built on a densely populated escarpment (a long, steep slope) that drops down to the River Mersey. This meant building on the surface would have been difficult without causing major disruption, but also that the landscape was ideal for the construction of a line that could be placed beneath the ground. Nevertheless, cutting both tunnels still proved to be a difficult task as care had to be taken to avoid disturbing the buildings above due to their shallow depth. The work from Byrom Street eastwards proved the most difficult and perilous and, despite efforts to excavate carefully, the soft clay in the area caused several houses to give way, rendering them uninhabitable. All the inhabitants were forced to abandon their homes at short notice. What this means is that the design of the tunnel – becoming two separate structures – was a result of circumstance. The first goods traffic travelled through the tunnels in August 1849. However, a three-foot section of Victoria Tunnel collapsed in September 1852. The collapse was quickly repaired and the tunnels were used by goods traffic without any further major incidents until 1899, when a freight train consisting of a tank, twenty-three loaded wagons and a brake van separated when a coupling between the seventh and eighth wagons fractured. Two wagons and the van were destroyed in the incident, and two of the three men aboard were killed. A train that was travelling towards the docks was also caught up in the accident as it collided with the debris and partially derailed. Although both the Waterloo and Victoria Tunnel were initially part of a freight line, they were opened to passenger traffic in 1895. Passenger services continued to run up until February 1971. Many of the large docks in Liverpool ‘dried up’ as they were affected by declining industry across the UK and this resulted in a significant decrease in traffic on the line. Both tunnels were officially closed on 19th November 1972; although, a small section of the Edge Hill line was retained as a headshunt. It is rumoured that this track is still used very occasionally today. Whether this is true or not, though, is another matter. The futures of both the Waterloo and Victoria Tunnel are uncertain. However, the Merseyrail Network have proposed to use part of them to create a connection to the low-level Liverpool Central Station. Creating the connection would reduce journey times to Edge Hill. Unfortunately, though, so far all plans have fallen through due to some local opposition and budget constraints. The last attempt to revive the line was made in 2007, driven by plans to redevelop the north shore area of Liverpool. Our Version of Events After meeting up with a couple of Liverpool based explorers, and hitting an old industrial site first, we decided to head over to the Waterloo/Victoria Tunnel. It was good to meet a couple of locals for a change because they both had an exceptional knowledge of the area – something we lack when it comes to exploring in Liverpool, unfortunately. Anyway, this saved us having to do much research and scouting for a change. So, thanks fellas! When we initially rocked up outside our chosen access point, several Network Rail guys were busy standing around a couple of shovels and one guy down a hole. Rather than leave and come back, though, we decided to sit in the car and wait for them to fuck off. Our patience paid off pretty quickly since the boys in orange decided to down tools literally five minutes after we’d parked up. Once they’d left, we gave them an additional five minutes before we grabbed our gear and made our way into the tunnels, to account for any of them who might have left their beloved tape measure or spirit level behind. The first tunnel, the Waterloo Tunnel, smelt strongly of tar or creosote. We weren’t sure of the source, but the floor was fairly manky, giving an indication that there may have been a recent spillage. That, however, was perhaps the most interesting part of this section of the explore. All in all, it didn’t seem especially exceptional – even if it was quite wide. Hoping the explore would be better in the latter half, then, we cracked on and made our way towards the open-air section. As several other reports have revealed, the open-air section/accident between the two tunnels is full of shit. It seems Liverpool folk don’t bother visiting the local tip, they simply lob their old goodies off the bridge on Fontenoy Street. Anyone seeking spare lawnmower parts, or a second-hand seatee, should get themselves straight down to the Waterloo Tunnel. Sadly, we didn’t need either, so we had to clamber over the mountain of shit instead, to reach the Victoria Tunnel on the other side. Once inside the Victoria Tunnel, we began our long walk towards Edge Hill Station. At this point, we weren’t aware how long the bloody thing is, but it soon became clear to us that the light at the end of the tunnel wasn’t getting much closer any time soon. Nevertheless, we plodded on, heading towards the small dot of light in the far distance. The Victoria Tunnel was much more interesting that its sister. A large proportion of it is brick-lined, but there are also large unlined sections that have simply been carved out. There are several ventilation shafts to look at along the way too, and each one is different to the last. It’s only now, having been inside the Victoria Tunnel, that we understand what a few of the random structures are on the surface directly above. Finally, the tunnel ends with a short section of railway track that is still in situ, which is always nice to find. The only things to be careful of down this end are Network Rail workers and, so we have been told, a camera waiting for unsuspecting visitors to the tunnel. Explored with Veryhighguy and The J Man. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26: 27: 28: 29: 30:
  17. This fortress was constructed by the Germans from 1907-1914. It served German soldiers during the First World War but saw little action. Then it was occupied by the French between 1919 & 1940, where it was incorporated into the maginot line for WWII. After the departure of French troops in June 1940, the German army took back the fort. On September 2, 1944, it was declared a fortress of the Reich by Hitler. The stronghold must therefore be defended until the last extremity by German troops, whose chiefs all took an oath to the Führer. In October 1944, the fort was captured by the American 3rd Army in the Battle of Metz. Definitely one of the best military sites I've visited yet. Amazing to think it served both WWI & WWII yet remains in such good condition today. There are dozens of murals dating back over a century, and 1,700m of tunnels connecting various sections. I had to be dragged away as I could have spent a week in here. Visited with @Maniac @extreme_ironing and @Andy. "Flourish German fatherland" "Cameroon child in Munich" / "Man does not agree" "Booze kills, so do not drink so much!" (or something to that effect....) "Beautiful is the recruit life" "Whoever quarrels or rushes gets the hell out of it" "May God punish England" Thanks for looking y'all
  18. Another visit from October with @Andy, @[email protected]_ironing. From seeing Andy's report I missed quite a few bits but you can't see everything unless you spend the whole day down there. Another epic bit of WW2 history and there's lots more out there. Ouvrage Mont des Welches, a gros ouvrage of the Maginot Line fortifications, is part of the Fortified Sector of Boulay. It comprises two entrance blocks, one infantry block, one artillery block, one observation block and two combination blocks. The underground gallery system is compact, about 200 metres (660 ft) from end to end, and unlike larger ouvrages where the gallery system is linear in concept, the central portion of Mont des Welches is a dense network of tunnels crossing one another, housing the barracks and utility areas. The galleries are excavated at an average depth of up to 30 metres (98 ft). Unlike most gros ouvrages, its 60 cm internal rail network was not electrified, relying on human power to move the rail cars. Relatively small for a gros ouvrage, Mont des Welches saw a brief period of sharp action in June 1940, when German forces moving along the rear of the Maginot Line engaged the position without success. The manning of the ouvrage in June 1940 comprised 490 men and 17 officers of the 167th Fortress Infantry Regiment and the 151st Position Artillery Regiment. After modest renovations in the 1950s, it was abandoned in the 1970s. Bon journée
  19. Ouvrage Hobling is a lesser work (petit ouvrage) of the Maginot Line. Located in the Fortified Sector of Boulay, the ouvrage consists of two infantry blocks and two observation blocks, and is located between gros ouvrage Michelsberg and petit ouvrage Bousse, facing Germany. Hobling was approved for construction by CORF (Commission d'Organisation des Régions Fortifiées), the Maginot Line's design and construction agency, in 1931 and became operational by 1935, at a cost of 14 million francs. Hobling played no significant role in either the Battle of France in 1940 or the Lorraine Campaign of 1944. After the Second World War it became part of the Mòle de Boulay, a strongpoint in the northeastern defenses against Soviet attack. It remained under Army control until 1971, after which it was declassified and sold in 1975. It has been stripped of metals and left abandoned. I've been to a fair few of these now. It's often a wild goose chase looking for the entrance in the middle of the forest but that's part of the fun. I think this was the only success we had out of 5 attempts that day so it was nice to get something done. There's hardly any pictures online so we weren't sure what to expect. It turned out to be in fairly good condition, no graffiti, the kitchen still intact, and a few other bits worth seeing. As with all of these bunkers it's an important piece of WWII history which is why I find them so fascinating no matter how little or how much is left. Visited with @Andy, afterwards I took him for a romantic meal Not a good time to lose your footing.... [ One of the gun turrets Thanks for looking
  20. The first stop on a recent trip to France and Luxembourg with @Andy. A former limestone mine in France, later used during WW2 for the production of oxygen. Quite a small mine and mostly flooded but there were some nice photos to be had. Thanks for looking
  21. This was the admin block for an adjacent steelworks. It was built in 1704, and despite being pretty battered nowadays, it still retains some of its former grandeur. The mixture of decay and natural light makes it quite photogenic. Plenty of reports from here before so this is just an update on its current state. Visited with @Maniac, @Andyand @extreme_ironing. Thanks for looking you bunch of silly little tossers
  22. History The factory was opened by Saunders-Roe during WW2, where it fitted out Catalina flying boats purchased from the US for the RAF. After the war, products built at the site included patrol boats and minesweepers and also bus bodies for London and Cuba. The site was taken over by Laird (Anglesey) in 1968. One of Laird s products was the unsuccessful Centaur, a Land Rover-based half-track vehicle. In 1996 FAUN took over their long-standing licensee Laird (nglesey) and in 1997 moved production to its newly built facility in Llangefni. The explore Pretty uneventful really. A lot quick hop over a wall and we were in a field of sheep who were so friendly they would foil anyone's attempt at stealth. 30 woolie shadows going baaa really loudly makes things really unsubtle. A quick squizz through the bushes and we were in. A nice relaxed amble around the bigger open sheds and an easy wiggle through a window into some others. Looks like the place is partially live though. As we peered around a corner near the front entrance we noticed a land-rover parked inside the fence and the door open but no one in sight. On trying a door as dilapidated looking as the rest a nice loud beeping started so we made a backwards retreat and mooched around the rest of the site. f Dffd Fg
  23. How to post a report using Flickr Flickr seems to change every time the wind changes direction so here's a quick guide on how to use it to post a report... Step 1 - Explore and take pictures Step 2 - Upload your chosen pictures to Flickr like this.. Step 3 - Once your images are successfully uploaded to flickr choose a category for the location that you have visited... Step 4 - Then "Start New Topic".. You will then see this screen... Step 5 - Now you are ready to add the image "links", known as "BBcodes", which allow your images to display correctly on forums.. Step 6 - Then click "select" followed by "view on photo page".. Now select "Share" shown below.. Step 7-13 - You will then see this screen... Just repeat those steps for each image until you're happy with your report and click "submit topic"! You can edit your report for 24 hours after posting to correct errors. If you notice a mistake outside of this window contact a moderator and they will happily rectify the problem for you
  24. A site that needs little introduction Battersea A Power Station was built in the 1930s, with Battersea B Power Station to the east in the 1950s. The two stations were built to an identical design, providing the long-recognized four-chimney layout. The station ceased generating electricity in 1983, but over the past 50 years it has become one of the best known landmarks in London and is Grade II listed. I never saw myself coming back here but when a couple of friends travelling from afar got in contact I decided I wouldn't mind checking out the current state of play, @extreme_ironing and @shaddam came along for the ride too. We got around the whole site and didn't see a soul all night, security here seems to be on the ball one minute and completely useless the next. After recent events with another group getting caught and finding themselves in a shitty situation I would recommend using caution here though. They seem to treat this site like it's on holy ground when they catch people but the truth of the matter is it's no different to being on any other site legally. It's just that security are bigger assholes than usual and I have a message for them. Fuck you asshole security, I've been on your site four times now you dumb twats and I intend to come back for more 1. Control Room A 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Maze of scaffolding 7. Switch Room B 8. 9. An area that was previously unaccessible before the scaffolding went up. 10. This allowed us to access Control Room B, completely empty now but this was once full of dials and switches with a control panel 11. It faced towards the turbine hall in this direction 12. Some old pipes tucked away on B side 13. An old painting still preserved in the turbine hall 14. Fake security on the roof 15. Looking down from the base of one of the chimneys 16. Morning mist blowing past as we bid farewell Thanks for looking
  25. After a curry and some beers with mates I decided to go climb something on my way home, as you do. The first site was a fail so I headed for the nearest crane and ended up here. I've always wanted to get up above Leicester Square but the insane amount of police everywhere always put me off. Tonight I didn't give a shit and it was quite amusing looking down on the police totally oblivious to me above them. Raw 1 - Police - Nil.....on this occasion at least 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Thanks for looking kids
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