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  1. CAMELOT - Theme Park - Photographic Report - Feb 2018 This abandoned resort and theme park is located in the English county of Lancashire. The park's theme was based on the well-known story of King Arthur and the Knights of the roundtable After numerous takeovers, the theme park was purchased by Story Group and leased to Knight's Leisure who ran the park. However, it's closure was announced by the operator, in November 2012. In August 2014, an application to build houses on the site was unanimously rejected with 261 public objections. As of Feb 2018, the park stands empty a former shadow of its glory day slowly but surely falling victim to mother nature. A new housing development plan has been submitted, to many a protest from the local residents, However, if it does go through the once magical kingdom of Camelot will be lost forever. We gained entry into the former petting zoo and made our way to the middle of the park where we were caught by 4 security guards and a static full of dogs. Anyway, I hope you can enjoy the pics as its all I was able to get. Any feedback greatly appreciated.
  2. Hey, guys here's my video report on the #post-apocalyptic #Camelot #ThemePark. I've already made a photographic report with a full history etc so I won't bore you with that here as it is featured in the footage. Thanks for any feedback guys take it, easy man. PEACE The Urban Collective We Film It...
  3. I have found a location close to me in West Yorkshire that has been covered before, the site is nearly completely destroyed but the main barn and some of the out buildings still exist. I enjoyed looking around the site and turning it into a cinematic style video (i hope i aren't hated for it, my last video i posted on here went down well). Let me know what you think of the video.
  4. Unless you've been to Scarborough you've probably never heard of Peasholm Park. They are currently demolishing the old boat house as it was dangerous. The Chinese gardens at the top never seem to be open so while the water is drained I got in. Bad idea was trying to walk across the pond bed, the mud was so deep my leg just sank and I almost got stuck. They made it easy to get around the big locked gate and up on to the bridge. I got some photos from the top looking down.
  5. Not sure if this is in the right forum. Park Hill Estate is a gastly sight today although they are regenerating it. This made for quite a creepy explore. We have wrritten about the history of Park Hill Flats here.
  6. History : Casement Park (Irish: Páirc Mhic Asmaint) is the principal Gaelic Athletic Association stadium in Belfast, Northern Ireland, home to the Antrim football and hurling teams. Located on the Andersonstown Road in the west of the city, and named after the Republican revolutionary Sir Roger Casement (1864-1916), the ground has a capacity of 32,600.[1] Casement Park, one of the largest stadia in Ulster, opened in June 1953, with Armagh Harps defeating St John’s of Antrim in the final of the inaugural Ulster Senior Club Football Championship.[2] The newly opened Casement Park hosted the Ulster Championship final less than a month later, which saw Armagh overcome reigning All-Ireland champions Cavan. In all, Casement Park has hosted eight Ulster football finals. However, the Antrim ground has not held the provincial showpiece since 1971, with St. Tiernach's Park in Clones hosting the final every year since except between 2004 and 2006 when it was moved to Croke Park such was the demand for tickets. A major facelift of the stadium took place in 2000, a move which saw more championship games played at Casement Park. In 2006, floodlights were added which allowed hurling and football to be played in the evening. In 2006, proposals were raised to build a new multi-purpose stadium on the site of the old Maze prison near Lisburn, which was intended to host association football, rugby union and Gaelic games. However, opposition to the idea led to it being dropped in favour of a new venue in the Sydenham area of East Belfast. This led to Ulster GAA, which was one of the partners in the Maze project, to pull out in favour of remaining at Casement Park.[3] In 2011, the Northern Ireland Executive announced that it had granted £138m for various stadium redevelopment projects throughout Northern Ireland. Ulster GAA would receive £61.4m of this, which was to be used to redevelop Casement Park into a 40,000 all-seated stadium with £15 million of partnership investment from the Central Council of the GAA, making it the largest stadium in Ulster.[4] In early 2012 it was announced that the redevelopment work would start at the end of 2013 with a view to having the new stadium open by September 2015. It was expected that, after its completion, Ulster GAA would move its headquarters from St Tiernach's Park in Clones to Casement Park,[5] which would then have a seating capacity of about 40,000.[6] In December 2014 the granting of planning permission for the redevelopment of Casement Park was ruled unlawful. On 28 April 2016 the team behind the Casement Park redevelopment proposals launched a consultation process in an effort to see what the general public's views are. On the 14th November 2016 Casement Park was officially included as part of Ireland's 2023 Rugby World Cup bid. 2006 controversy A decision in 2006 by the Antrim County Board to permit the use of Casement Park to host a Republican rally in commemoration of the deaths of Provisional IRA and INLAprisoners in the 1981 hunger strike drew criticisms from unionists. Visited in late 2015, casement lies the same today although work on redevelopment is expected to start very soon. knowing the social club was still in use allowed access to part of the ground and the rest i just had to blagg.
  7. HISTORY wiki text: Riverside Amusement Park was an amusement park in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA from 1903 to 1970. Originating as a joint venture between engineer/amusement park developer Frederick Ingersoll and Indianapolis businessmen J. Clyde Power, Albert Lieber, and Bert Fiebleman and Emmett Johnson, the park was built by Ingersoll's Pittsburgh Construction Company adjacent to Riverside City Park at West 30th Street between White River and the Central Canal in the Riverside subdivision of Indianapolis. The decade of the 1960s was not a kind one for Riverside Amusement Park, which was losing attendance for the first time since the end of World War II. By the time John Coleman lifted the "whites only" policy (in response to a series of protests organized by the NAACP Youth Council in 1963), the park was losing $30,000 a year. Increased cost of insurance, maintenance, and new rides, coupled with increased competition from the emerging theme parks, were cited by Coleman as the park closed for the last time at the end of the 1970 season. All the rides were sold or demolished by 1978. The land lay undisturbed for more than two decades, until the construction of the River's Edge subdivision in the early 2000s. =========================================================================================================================================== STORY In 1979 my buddies and I heard that they were getting ready to bulldoze the site of the long defunct Riverside Amusement Park in Indianapolis so we decided to drive by to get a final look. When we got there we were amazed to find easy access to the grounds. With my trusty Practica LLC at hand we ventured within and explored for several minutes until we came to the stark realization that this neglected plot of land had become the home to countless wild dogs. Picking up debris for clubs we beat a hasty retreat (pausing of course for a commemorative selfie.) The pictures were taken on 35mm slide film... Back in 2005 I came across the slides and crapily scanned them using a junky flat-bed scanner and used those images to create the Animated GIF below to send cross country via email to one of the krew. If there is a prize for worst images on OS these would surely take it - but even in this 'State' they trigger memories of that adventure; so in that they are still doing their job... Impressionists Views of Riverside Amusement Park (circa 1979) I opened this GIF and extracted the individual images and tried to enhance them to some degree. I then repackaged thumbnails of these into a fresh GIF that is marginally more effective than the original. (shown at end of report) Ticket Booth Shoot 25¢ From Inside Ring-Toss Main Attraction The Weed-lined Path Wheee! Domed (Doomed) Skating Rink Three scared cats in a dog park! (that's me on the right rockin' the Frampton 'do) Take Two If I ever come across the original transparencies again I will have to get some proper enlargements made.
  8. Not much to say about this one ,It was a Ragstone mine for building stone, probably 19th century,there has been much rumour of tunnels under this area and not much actual information ,seems it was opened up many years ago and surveyed after it had been sealed up in the 1960's,some evidence of later visits are visable but other than that it seems to have been forgotton about and became more rumour than fact in later years! Props to Obs for finding a way into this one
  9. footage and pics are taken from two quick visits. One in August and one in November 2016. Some stolen history......... In 2008 the farm was closed after concerns were raised about the welfare of the birds that were kept there. These included Harris hawks, red-tailed hawks, two emaciated European eagle owls and Lanner falcons. In 2005, nine eagle owls kept at the council-owned site were used in film Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. Since the farm was abandoned it has become a dangerous eyesore, and a meeting place for local kids and with evidence of drug taking on the site. Piles of rubbish litter the farm buildings, where slates have been stolen from the roof and fires have been started. In 2009 RATS president Paul Dainton called upon Wakefield Council to make the site safer after the buildings became too unsafe to be left as they were. In July 2010 the farm was sold at auction by Wakefield Council for £162,000, selling for almost double the guide price. It is unsure of what the new owners plan to do with site at present. info taken from www.stanleyhistoryonline.com Feedback welcome, still new to this.
  10. I thought now would be a good time to kick off 2015 with my first report of the year After countless trips around the UK to visit various mines and quarries, it begged the question as to what is located closer to home as there must have been mining activity around Kent. Throughout the area there are extensive underground coal mines and their history is well documented with some of the topside sites now sitting abandoned. All coal mines were capped to prevent access and with obvious hazards like gases and lack of oxygen, these locations are not accessible nor are we able to explore them without some serious kit and knowledge of the risks associated. I have spent much time this year researching and searching for mines and quarries in Kent which may still be existent below our feet. Which is what leads me to this place. I started to find reference to chalk, sandstone, and ragstone workings across Kent although they are few and far between. Some years ago we had managed to successfully locate and explore an abandoned chalk mine at Manston and another much larger chalk mine at Eastry (both of which I believe have been reported on). Next I began to research the old ragstone workings located in Westerham and with various members and repeat trips we managed to explore most of the main workings. Next we moved into North Kent where I had been researching another large chalk mine, again we successfully gained entry and posted a report here. I am sure that there is more to be found with regard to mining activity in Kent although for me there was one last major piece of the puzzle. A sandstone mine based in Medway was the target. For years there had been talk of a set of tunnels based under Medway and there was even discussions on the forums about these tunnels that seemed to have disappeared with no trace. Although I had always been aware there was something there and had discussions with other explorers over the years, I had never put any real effort into finding them. I began to research the rumored tunnels and found a few interesting leads to investigate. I travelled up to Medway with a non-member Trav a couple of times and spent hours searching the area for any trace of an entrance to the underground workings. Eventually we had what we needed and made our way home to devise a plan. A few weeks later we returned to explore the underground workings and after a small amount of digging we managed to gain access. The last documented access to the mine was in the early 90’s although there was evidence that people have got in there since then due to graffiti in different areas and rubbish left lying around. Despite this we know that the place has not been accessed for a good few years and has almost become completely forgotten and lost. For those of you that don’t know any of the history:- Kent is not particularly well-endowed with underground stone quarries but ragstone was worked as a building material, at least since Roman times, and is used extensively throughout the county. In 1990 Kent Underground Research Group) got permission from Maidstone Borough Council to re-open the ragstone quarries in Mote Park. Maidstone, like East Surrey, has its legendary tunnels that run for improbable distances between impossible locations, which suggests the likelihood of substantial underground workings existing somewhere. The Mote Park quarries were sealed with a huge quantity of rubble and hardcore in the 1960s. The idea was to excavate the rubble out of the fissure until the expected open gallery was reached. The fissure had draughted strongly during digging operations, suggesting open passage existed not far away from the digging front. Access was finally gained on August 26th and what was seen were in many ways similar to the firestone workings in Surrey. There were probably about 1000 metres of passage, though not all of the mine was explored. It will be interesting to see how the workings compare with the East Surrey firestone quarries. Firestone was widely used for carvings and reasonably intricate decorative work in buildings such as churches. Ragstone was more often a basic building material, and did not usually lend itself to more than simple shaping, and was certainly not used for fine work to any real extent. Once inside the workings it was easy to see why the mine had been sealed years ago as we found it to be quite unstable and so we had to carefully navigate our way through crawl spaces without disturbing any unstable sections. After about 10minutes of crawling through tight gaps and over dead’s then we reached the main haulage route which was a lot larger in size and had been built up with walls of dead rocks to either side. I have now returned to the mine a number of times with various members in order to push on and explore all of the workings. I am confident that we have now covered the whole system and although there is little in the form of miner’s tools, rails, etc. We did find some large fossils, wooden props supporting the roof and natural fissures which were all nice to see and definitely made the explore worthwhile. Again, it just goes to show how rewarding this hobby can be when you put in the effort, research and persistence. Massive respect to Trav (non-member) for all the efforts he put into this one with me as he was on the case from the moment I mentioned the place, and to Hermy for helping us get in. Finally….here are some pictures for you to enjoy….
  11. An abandoned house near a park. Unfortunately, I know nothing about its history. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24
  12. Morning all, After seeing a report report on this place, and with a day off coming up, i decided i wanted to have a look at this place and climb the gas holder and take some photos in the centre one where the canopy has collapsed and now seats some still water for some reflections. Some history although its quite hard to find The largest of the three has been at the site for around 45-50 years, with the second largest having been built around 40 years ago, along with the smallest of the three. All three of the holders are inactive and have been for well over a decade. The site is owned by Southern Gas Networks. Sp, off i went not knowing any real details other than just looking at google maps and planning a route i would take, boy was that wrong, ended up by a little stream with no way over. I made a call to someone who has visited before and he led me in the right direction. When i got to access point, it was no means easy, esp as i was on my own, but got in with no real problems. Once you are up next to these things, you realise just who big they are. I made my way to the furthest one and made my way up. The stairs being gated off, and the walkway that links 2 of them together also, so you have to climb outside of it to get across. So i made it to the middle one and as it was daylight manaaged to take shots without my tripod which is a nice change. I then made my way up the ladders, i only got to halfway before deciding not to go any further as 1) the ladders were abit wobbly tbh and 2) i was on my own. Anyway, hope you enjoy my photos kr And the last shot i took on the day Thanks for looking DJ
  13. History ​ Motspur Park, also known locally as West Barnes is a suburb in south-west London in the boroughs of Royal Borough of Kingston upon Thames and London Borough of Merton. It owes its identity to the railway station of the same name, which has six trains an hour to London’s Waterloo, and to the adjacent parade of small shops. Two prominent gas holders, which are used to store the consumer gas supply for south west London stand just south of the shopping parade and can be seen from a wide area. The Explore ​ So the largest gas holder has caved in and made a kind of lake, it smells a bit gassy but its cool none-the-less. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Thanks for reading!
  14. History The site on which the Park International Hotel now sits on was originally occupied by a footwear warehouse, for Freeman Hardy & Willis Ltd. The site, like others across the city, also included lodgings for the company director and caretaker. By 1940, however, the warehouse had been completely destroyed by the Luftwaffe, after one of the heaviest bombing raids Leicester would ever experience during the war. Since much of the city was damaged in the aftermath, and more important redevelopment projects took priority, the site remained an abandoned wasteland up until 1955. The area was purchased and cleared of debris, although it wasn’t until the early 1970s that the main tower would appear on the city’s horizon. Like others at the time, such as Hallam Towers in Sheffield, the new property was designed to be a modern development that paid tribute to an era of prosperity. Nonetheless, as with most hotels, it changed hands several times throughout its lifetime and each time it was renamed accordingly. It is estimated that it remained as the Park International Hotel for the longest period of time. Over the years the hotel was a popular venue and it attracted many guests from other parts of the country. It was perhaps for this reason why the lower levels of the hotel were used to house the Leicester Exhibition Centre from the 1980s onward. The building finally closed down in 2009 owing to its declining reputation and inadequate structural integrity. During the 2000s there were several incidents where concrete had fallen from the structure onto the street below. Despite plans to repair the decaying premises, so that it could perhaps be converted into residential or student accommodation, no plans were ever approved. As the building has stood in a dilapidated state for many years, it has become too dangerous for property redevelopers to enter. Future plans now involve demolishing the site, to make way for new innovative city projects. Our Version of Events With only a few hours before Punk had to retire for the night *curfew – cough*, we decided that we’d still have time for a quick raid on the old Park International Hotel site. We’d heard rumours that access was particularly interesting so it caught our attention almost instantly. We’d also been itching to see Leicester from somewhere high. On the whole access wasn’t particularly difficult, but it was definitely entertaining. Inside, the hotel is absolutely fucked, so that was a little disappointing. Nevertheless, the rooftop view from the tower didn’t disappoint at all. From up there we could see for miles; it was just a shame we weren’t able to see it with all the lights switched on. Explored with Ford Mayhem, KM_Punk and Soul. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21:
  15. It feels nice to be back home exploring although today of all days I refuse to use the term 'easter eggsploring'.I bailed out of doing this place twice in months past as it is situated on a very busy residential road so never found the right time to access the place, but Easter Sunday seemed like a good bet and so I finally did along with Mr. OverArch. To be honest it was a let down, it looks like such a great building from the outside with the clock tower and everything but the inside is screwed - the floors are riddled with dry rot so only a couple of the concrete-floored classrooms and the corridors are safe to walk on. No access up the clock tower either...well there was, but looking at the state of the ladders brought back bad memories from Birkenhead's Central Hydraulic Tower so was an instant no... Fibbersley Park Primary School closed around 2010 or 2011, and in 2013 the building containing the hall/gymnasium was destroyed in an arson attack and subsequently demolished. Not a huge amount to see as it's been largely stripped of everything, but it satisfied my curiosity at least. A few more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157651314317107/ After visiting I showed OverArch around George Dykes just down the road and took a few highly inappropriate images involving the 'gentlemans reading material' littered around the place.
  16. Camelot Theme Park Visited with: This was a solo explore. Visit date: June 2015 Please Note: Entry is always through an open access point and not by forcing our way in….. We are explorers, not vandals. History Camelot opened in 1983 and was operating seasonally until late 2012. The park was based on the story of 'Camelot, King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table' and the park decor incorporated pseudo-medieval elements. From 1986 till 2012 the park changed hands a couple of times and from around 1995 the visitor count started to slowly decline. In 1995, Camelot's attendance was 500,000 visitors throughout the season. In 2005 Camelot's attendance was only 336,204 visitors. In February 2009, the owners announced that the park was in receivership and would not reopen for the 2009 season, however in April 2009 a buyer was found and the park re-opened in May 2009. The closure of the park was announced by its operator in November 2012, the managing director blaming poor summer weather and events such as London 2012 and the Queen's Jubilee for declining visitor numbers. Soon after some of the roller coasters and attractions were sold such as the Whirlwind to a German theme park & the Pendragon's Plunge & The Pirate Ship were both sold to UK Theme Parks. An application to build 420 houses on the site by owners was unanimously rejected by the local Council in August 2014 as the development was not permissible within the Green Belt. As of 2015 the park is still standing, albeit crumbling and having been attacked several times by arsonists. Rides that still stand on the site include the Knightmare roller coaster. My Visit I planned to visit here a lot sooner than I did as the park is close to my hometown and I have memories of visiting here a couple of times in my younger years. What I remember most from my visits as a child here were the Jousting tournaments. The Knights on horseback & foot battling in front of my eyes was magical and the children loved it and I was one of those children, cheering and screaming for their favourite Knight to win and in turn jeering at the enemy Knight from the stands. I knew the areas I wanted to visit prior to arrival and I had a planned route. I knew where the security would be if they was on site so I felt confident in getting to see the areas I wanted. Upon entering the park I headed straight for the Jousting arena. Who would have thought that almost 30 years later on from me sitting in the stands cheering and shouting that I would be walking around the arena. The arena now feels so lifeless, no Knights jousting or sword fighting, no children cheering, jeering or laughing nothing! The only sound today was from the wind blowing through the empty stands…… Just up the hill from the arena is the platform for the Dragon Flyer. In 2013 the ride was relocated to Pleasureland in Southport. The strange thing is that a lot of the track is still in situe here, why that is I have no idea. Whilst taking these photos I noticed movement just off to left… I looked over and there was a lone female wandering through the arena, she looked like she had just finished work or was on a stroll. I kept quiet as not to scare her and waited till she was gone before moving on. The next area on my list was the Knightmare roller coaster, the largest structure left on site. I decided to try the easy route knowing that security would be there if they was on site at all. I slowly walked up the path and hey presto I spotted the security car, no problem I will find another way. I found a way around, however, it was a knightmare route (perfect name for it) and lets just say that 20 minutes later, sweatier and dirtier than 20 minutes before this is what I see. So close but still a little further to go. I worked my way around the edge of the grounds to stay out of sight of security. Here is a photo a little closer, not far to go. Finally I make it around the back of Knightmare without being seen and I wasted no time in taking photos. This photo was taken looking into the direction of the sun where as the earlier photos the sun was behind me. As you can see it gave a very eerie look to the image. Here are a few I took whilst underneath the coaster. I spent a good 30 minutes here trying to cover as many angles as possible before heading off back the way that I came. Time to get a little more sweatier and dirtier than I already am. With most of the areas photographed that I came here for I was happy to start heading back to the front entrance. The main entrance spires would be my last photo of the trip. I know there are lots more buildings on site to look in but from recent reports I decided not to waste any time as they have been badly damaged by both weather and vandals. As I was walking up to the hill I noticed a man walking the road at the top, however, he never noticed me. I gave him 30 seconds to move on a little before continuing up the hill. When I got to the top he was stood taking photos of the arena so I knew he was not security and I said hello. As we exchange pleasantries security drove past in front of the arena and he spotted us. We waited for him to arrive as I do not believe in running as it will only annoy them. When security got to us he gave us the usual speech and asked us the usual questions. I have heard stories of security here being heavy handed at times but that is not what I witnessed. We was polite and in turn so was he, we let him do his job and that made the situation a little more relaxed. We spoke with him for a while before he escorted us to the main entrance where he also allowed me to get the final shot that I wanted, the Spires. More images available on flickr The images above are just a small selection of the images I have edited. I will be adding lots more photos of Lotus Hall aka Cuckoo Hall on my Flickr page which can be found here, https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Final thoughts I am glad that I have managed to tick this off my list even though I know I left it a little to long. If I had come here when I first started exploring there would have been so much more for me to see and a lot less damage and decay. This explore felt so different to all the other places I have been which I feel is down to the fact that I visited here a couple of times as a child so I have a connection, a memory of how the park once was. A place that was once so colourful & filled with the laughter of children, the smells of candy floss, the screams from people on the rides, the loudspeakers blaring out times of shows…. Not now though, nothing but the sound of the wind, creaking doors, and the smell of decay. Such a shame to see the park like this even though I can still see the beauty within, R.I.P Camelot. Thanks for reading, Dugie
  17. Visited with The_Raw and MiaroDigital. Pool Park House was built for the second Lord Bagot in 1826-29. In order to counteract the overcrowding of the Denbigh Asylum, the North Wales Counties Mental Hospital bought Pool Park House and opened there a home for mentally ill people in 1937, with rooms for 87 patients. The hospital was closed about 1990. It's sad to see the present condition, compared with older photos. Much was destroyed and stolen, as ornaments on the staircase, ornate panels of wood and figures made of wood and stucco. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
  18. The Hotel closed in January 2015 due to running at a loss and bad reviews. It has since been sold onto a retirement home developer. Not an amazing explore but the bathroom was cleaner then most peoples and even has running water and a flushing toilet! Below is a few bits of information about the hotel: Inside New Forest National Park and a 2-minute walk from bike rentals, this old-school hotel is in a sprawling Victorian-style building on 5 acres. It's a 3-minute walk from multiple shopping and dining options on High Street. This 3-star hotel is situated between Southampton and Bournemouth. The hotel has 59 individually decorated bedrooms, all en-suite, in a choice of standard or premier room. Each room comes with a number of facilities to make guest's stay as comfortable as possible. Closure: http://www.dailyecho.co.uk/news/11607497.Shock_over_hotel_closure_announcement/ Thank You!
  19. After a boring day at work I dusted off the waders and found myself in some tunnels under Roundhay park. Shortly after walking into the tunnel my torch decided to run out of batteries this meant using a head torch to light the place up!
  20. So, after discovering a thread I convinced my camera club that Loudon would be worth a wee visit. We set off this evening to explore and take some photos. Remarkably easy to get in, despite the big gate - it was just a matter of walking around the outside of the gate and then up to driveway to the castle. That's it really - you have complete access to the site. To be honest it appears to be far from abandoned - in fact it is very well looked after. The grass is mown and everything appears to be largely undamaged. Many of the rides have been taken down and removed but there was still a fair bit to see. Well worth a visit if you are in the area.
  21. This Fairytale Park with associated Restaurant is located on a Plateau next to the Rhine. It was built in 1927 and opened for the public in July 1931. The Park closed forever in the middle of the 90s. Sadly i forgot my tripod, that's why some of the pics are "a little bit"sloped. I tried a revisit in summer but that wasn't possible because the vegetation was very strong.
  22. Petite explo d'hier, faisant un temps magnifique on a décidé de partir sans grande prétention, en l'espace de 30min on trouve le lieu via google map, 1h30 après on est sur les lieux, on reste quasi 3h dedans, on ressort �* la nuit tombée. Le lieu a quand même un peu souffert avec le temps surtout dans l'entrée du bâtiment, quelques graffs qui viennent gâcher l'endroit... PS: L'arrière du bâtiment sert de remise aux habitations qui sont �* côté... La suite prochainement!
  23. So its nice to get into another derp, been a while since I've done a nice, exciting big derp and this is one I have considered doing for a while. Visited on a miserable November morning with MrDan We started off with the maternity unit which has been disused since 1998 and it certainly shows! Although much to our suprise and for reasons unknown, the electricity is on in this very dilapidated part of the site. We spent a good few hours photographing this part of the hospital before moving on to the X-ray wards which closed in 2009. The power was recently on in here, with reports of their being juice to the X-Ray Machines! On this occasion the power was off, which can only be a good thing really as someone who doesn't know what they are doing could hurt someone. We spent a good 7-8 hours in here and progressed onto the main hospital part but found secca sealing it on the inside so decided to call it a day as the night was drawing in anyway. The Cambridge Military Hospital opened in 1879 and was to play a vital role in The First World War as being the first base to receive casualties from The Western Front. The first case of plastic surgery in the British Empire was performed here; at the CMH; Captain Gillies (later known as Sir Harold Gillies), met Hippolyte Morestin, while on leave in Paris in 1915. During this time he was reconstructing faces in the Val-de-Grace Hospital in Paris. He was soon to fall in love with the work, and at the end of 1915 he came back from France to start a Plastic Unit in the CMH. When the Second World War was over, the importance of Britain's military commitments declined and civilians were admitted to the hospital. The Maternity wing closed in around 1996-98. Other sections of the hospital remained open as Frimley Park Hospital which was an NHS civilian hospital which closed sometime in 2009. #1 #2 #3 #4 The famous "Bleeding Doors" which were done this way for a film apparently. #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/with/15635196688/
  24. I've been working up in Newcastle and on the way back home I decided to stop and take a break I've not seen this one posted for a couple of years but I've always fancied it so popped in Leeds council don't fuck about And finally the end
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