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  1. this second part nearly didnt happen as when i arrived i found the yard had changed hands and was all set to write it off as a waste of time and head home untill i spotted something in the far corner of the yard and sought permission to take some photographs which was given by way of intercom so off i trotted across the yard camera in hand to find my subject. mass transit was founded in May 1998 by Michael Strafford an engineering business, performing contract maintenance for other operators. It also specialised in the conversion of buses for non-passenger use. It then diversified into the operation of school bus services At the time operations ceased it operated 86 routes serving 32 schools and at its peak carried some 15,000 children a day to and from schools across south yorkshire and lincolnshire Between 2001 and 2005, Brightbus, then known as Mass Transit, had a substantial presence in lincolnshire following the acquisition of the bus operations of Applebys Coaches, Reliance Travel of great gonnerby and the grantham depot of lincolnshire roadcar. The Grantham operation failed under Mass ownership and was sold to centrebus and the Lincoln area operations to dunn line in 2005 In 2004, BrightBus purchased the long established Leon Motors of finningley that was formed in 1922 and operated buses in doncaster by 2008 the company's stage-carriage work had passed to first south yorkshire and concentrated on school contracts which were based at the main BrightBus depot at north anston mass/transit now brightbus disposed of the elderly leon and northern bus fleets which had kept the stage carriage and school services going and ran a fleet of 73 buses, including many English built three-axle dennis dragons and leyland olympians the dragons repatriated from Hong Kong. painted in what i thought was a very sickly green michael strafford retired at 55 stating ill health but didnt want to sell the business although he has disposed of the vast majority of the bright bus fleet possibly to other school or service bus operators . today the yard is in the hands of hallam express a logistics company full of lorries and fork lift trucks but a few of michaels buses are stored in the far corner of the yard all be it in a scrap state i think he is trying to sell these vehicles on for preservation rather than send them to booth roe or carlton PSV at barnsley he also still owns the former depot at leon wether these are to pass on to his family or he his hanging on for a better price i wouldnt know what i do know is like leon this marks the passing of another operator from the bus world. i acknowlage the author of the brightbus photos a rather scruffy mass transit bus possibly filling in between school runs heads for hexthorpe near doncaster a mixed group of bright buses mostly repatriated hong kong tri axles wait for the school run a wider view of the hong kong tri axles sandwich in a leyland olympian a hong kong tri axle MIL 55774 stands under the bus wash hong kong BIG 9823 which moved to leon finningley for a short time and C887 RFE parked at the rear of the yard near the inspection ramps viewed through the fence american schoolbus GHL 212 V in the yard as stated bright buses yard is now home to hallam express logistics lorries now park where buses once used to the former bus repair sheds now used for storage this is all that remains of brightbus a hong kong tri axle and a few scrap buses stored in one corner of the yard a side view of tri axle E537AKU and olympian W141 EON which spells leon the company brightbus aquired in 2004 the hong kong still retains its brightbus fittings and that of its previous company an interior view of the downstairs of hong kong looking down the bus it smelt like one of the museum type buses a unused shut in smell not unpleasant looking up the bus to be honest its in good condition and would make a runner again where as leon was in a deploreable state had to squeeze past rammels corner to get the interior shot SN53 KKH stands in pieces far from its london home although inside it could have just finished the days service came across this dennis dominator a long way from home formally with greys from ely complete with its cambridgeshire county council notice with junk dumped in its interior but wait all is not what it seems ...its colour and the sticker insider gives it away it was formally a magic bus based near piccadilly manchester the american schoolbus GHL 212 V is still parked up in the yard the interior and drivers seat tastefully redone ..... in moquet...yuck!! and as i take my leave the bus wash still exists but out of use mass brightbus still need fitters and the spirit of mass /brightbus continues to haunt the north anston industrial estate
  2. mass/brightbus was the parent company of leon purchased in 2004 and stated in my leon post one of my other to do yards as this would be a very lengthy report and so as not to spoil the present report i have decided to split this in to 2 parts the mass/brightbus depot was located on houghton road of the north anston industrial estate some 12 miles from sheffield and were operators of local school bus contacts and a few stage carriage services. but this yard has a history that goes back even further than mass/ brightbus as it was originally the yard of a former employer of mine northern bus or the northern bus company as it was offically known. northern bus was formed during the 1986 deregulation era by duncan roberts northern bus challenged south yorkshire transport on the dinnington to sheffield bus corridor resulting in syt handing all services over to the independent northern bus who ran all sheffield services from dinnington interchange to sheffield interchange and meadowhall along with school contracts for the local authority. northern bus also ran cross border services between sheffield and worksop in nottinghamshire on the service x85 sheffield to halifax x38 and also challenged a yorkshire traction /west riding alliance on service x32 to leeds with a variation of bristol VR,s bristol RE,s and service coaches for the x32 service everything bought second hand mostly from crosville in around 2001 northern bus was sold to a bus engineering company called mass transit later to become brightbus who took over the school contracts and stage carriage work for a short while longer. as i said so as not to spoil the next part of the report i will leave the story there and continue it under mass/brightbus but leave you with some delightfull pictures of northern buses in service. former crosville bristol RE HRN 108 N stands VOR at north anston depot awaiting repairs or being stripped for parts note the roof from the open top bus alongside. another former crosville coach 222 WFM stands at north anston with 85 sheffield on the blind this was the cross border south yorkshire/nottinghamshire service to worksop in company with a RE which had been to rotherham. looking like it has had bodyshop attention elderly ex crosville bristol RE EFM 178 H parked at the depot alongside interloper bristol VR HTU 159 N itself from crosvile liverpool formerly DVG 270 N bought by another school contractor and coach operator jhonson brothers from hodthorpe derbyshire possibly in for repair during the mass era.
  3. Sheffield Old Town Hall stands on Waingate in central Sheffield, England, opposite Castle Market. The building was commissioned to replace Sheffield's first town hall, which had opened in 1700 to a design by William Renny. This first structure stood by the parish church, on a site with little prospect for extension. The Old Town Hall was built in 1807-8 by Charles Watson, and was designed to house not only the Town Trustees but also the Petty and Quarter Sessions. The initial building was a five-bay structure fronting Castle Street, but it was extended in 1833 and again in 1866, the most prominent feature was the new central clock tower over a new main entrance that reoriented the building to Waingate. At the same time, the building's courtrooms were linked by underground passages to the neighbouring Sheffield Police Offices. By the 1890s, the building had again become too small, and the current Sheffield Town Hall was built further south. The Old Town Hall was again extended in 1896-7 and became Sheffield Crown Court and Sheffield High Court. In the 1990s, these courts moved to new premises, and since at least 1997 to present, the building remains disused.
  4. History The works was built in 1913 and extended in 1954, to purify water from the Strines, Dale Dike and Agden reservoirs. In 1930 it had the first telephone installed in Bradfield and served well with the Yorkshire Water Authority taking over in in 1974. The UK’s water industry became privatised in 1989, the premises closed in 1994 following the completion of the new Water Treatment Works in the Loxley Valley. More recently Proposals to convert the derelict water filter works into housing have being held up by bats. A protected species survey has to be carried out in the summer (2014) before a decision can be taken on an application to turn the derelict building into 15 studio apartments. The scheme, which also involves adding five cottages in the grounds and using old ponds as a trout farm, off Mill Lee Road, has been withdrawn for the time being. It is due to be resubmitted to the Peak Park planning authority once the survey results are known. Read more at: https://www.sheffieldtelegraph.co.uk/news/environment/bats-delay-village-housing-scheme-in-low-bradfield-1-6525905 Explore Bit off the beaten track this one... that said the works is set in a picturesque village situated just outside Sheffield. The building is built from yorkshire stone and sits well in its surroundings albeit in its derelict state. The building is sat on large plot of land although the works itself is a little on the small side considering its past as a water works. The works consist of three rooms, one of those smaller to the rear of the building. Theres also a raised office area off one of the larger rooms and toilets at the opposite side. The building is in good condition to say it's been left for over twenty years with easy entry to the building. Theres lots of graffiti some of which are shown in the post... this said not all are represented here. Its definitely worth a visit and offers entry level explorers a great insight into urban exploring + theres a great pub just across the road offering a great local ale. Some pics Little lad absolutely loving it from above It's been a while since we explored speaking with others it has a full time security guard and some high end CCTV have also been installed
  5. After visiting a different location in the city we got a tip off from others about a possible entry point so decided to take a look. Having assessed the building for security we made our way to the entry point. The building is situated in the Neepsend area of the city and forms part of Kelham island one of the oldest industrial sites in Sheffield which as an heritage for producing high-quality cutlery and edge-tools and its pre-eminence in manufacturing heavy specialist steels. The victorian grade II listed building once occupied by Barnsley resides in 37 thousand Sq ft of industrial heritage and is the last significant development opportunity in Kelham island. Today Kelham is a mixed use riverside development which compromise the creation of old and new use of buildings forming apartments, bars & restaurants, and commercial space on the riverside site of former workshops. The development is part of an ongoing regeneration of the area by AXIS and others, which started in the 1990s with Cornish place. The development is intended to create a desirable place to live with a brand new public square, and continuation of the Don riverside walk project. Due to increasing competition from imports, Sheffield has seen a decline in heavy engineering industries since the 1960s, which has forced the sector to streamline its operations and lay off the majority of the local employment. George Barnsley's is a little like stepping back inside a time machine, most of the original machinery and features still exist and for this alone is well worth a visit before the inevitability of re development. Also noteworthy is the local artists that decorate the building with graffiti and art which gives the explore a real urban edge. And to end off a pic from modern day... I went back to this place the other day... Opening the gate to enter i didn't bother going in, the old man was right it is a dump in there and natural decay has took over... but that said if you have never been in take a look, you can get some nice shots even with a crappy iPhone
  6. Not sure if this is in the right forum. Park Hill Estate is a gastly sight today although they are regenerating it. This made for quite a creepy explore. We have wrritten about the history of Park Hill Flats here.
  7. History The "Record" trademark was registered by the firm of C & J Hampton in the Trade Mark Journal in 1909. Charles and Joseph Hampton were Sheffield toolmakers and ironfounders located at Eagle Foundry in Livingston Road, Sheffield, who had originally started their business in 1898 manufacturing marlin spikes and specialist castings. By 1908 C & J Hampton became a limited company. It wasn't until January 1931 that the company introduced a range of woodworking planes, based on the popular patterns of the Stanley Tool brand, in their No. 10 catalogue. By this time the factory had relocated to Ouse Road in Attercliffe, Sheffield, and the new planes were being marketed as "an entirely new British product", benefitting from new Government import tariffs which penalised imports and assisted British manufacturers in combatting the influx of imported planes from America and other countries. Woodworking planes made by Stanley Tools in particular dominated the British market and so a "Buy British" campaign was instigated to help combat the depression in Britain at that time. In October 1934, C & J Hampton bought the manufacturing rights from John Rabone And Sons Ltd. for the entire range of iron planes and spoke shaves formally manufactured by Edward Preston And Sons Ltd. of Birmingham. By the early 1930's it had become apparent that Preston's had fallen into financial difficulties and they were subsequently bought out by Rabone's in October 1932. Prior to this, Preston's had been Rabone's main competitor in the manufacture of rules and levels so the takeover made perfect business sense however, after the acquisition, Rabone struggled with the concept of becoming planemakers as well, and saw it as a deviation from their traditional product lines. They did, however, spend almost two years re-organising the iron plane making department at Preston's Whittall Works before deciding that "certain products were found not to conform readily with the company's other interests.", so the rights were then sold to C & J Hampton. Record continued to add various planes and spokeshaves to its product line over the coming years, but were forced to drop some of their range because of wartime restrictions. It is unfortunate to note that many of these planes and spoke shaves never made it back into production once the restrictions had been lifted. During the 1950's and into the early 1960's, Catalogue No. 16 was frequently reissued in pocket form to keep customers informed of new tools, as well as the availability of certain pre-war planes, spokeshaves and other tools. Price lists were also updated wherever necessary. It wasn't until the firm had moved into new premises at Parkway Works in 1963 that Catalogue No. 17 was issued and that the product line had "stabilised" from its post-war restrictions. In 1972, C & J Hampton Ltd. merged with William Ridgway Ltd. to form Record-Ridgway Tools Ltd. By doing so, Record had taken on the manufacturing of wood boring tools, which was Ridgway's core business. AB Bahco, a Swedish chisel & woodworking tool company, bought Record-Ridgway Tools in March 1981, and renamed it Record Holdings in 1985, before renaming it again three years later to Record Marples (Woodworking Tools) Ltd. Around the same time the names of both "Record" and "Marples" appeared on the body castings of some planes -- predominantly the bench and block planes -- around the front knob. It was obviously a period of great upheaval for the firm as the company was renamed a further three times in the 1990's -- Record Tools Ltd. in 1991, Record Holdings plc in 1993 and then Record Tools Ltd. (a division of American Tool Companies Inc) in 1998. However, the company struggled financially and went into administration in 1998. It was then acquired by US-based Irwin Tools in 1998 but was closed down soon after as the American owners moved production to China. Explore Firstly we scaled the building to accomplish if any security were present & possible entry points... No probs with either so decided to take a look. The building is in poor condition and requires a little climbing and clambering through trees to reach. Theres asbestos present on site so was prepared with masks, the building is a fair size and took a little over an hour to explore. Lots of Sheffield graffiti art which is of a high standard and plenty of original features exist (unbelievably).. The building as come under attack from a lot of vandalism including fire damage, deliberate destruction and pigeons (lots of these present in the building), Theres also high levels of natural damage caused to the building via the weather (some areas the roofs not intact). Theres access to the upper floors via a central staircase (also leads to the roof) and a staircase at the west side of the building... lots of rooms leading off the staircases some safer than others. We were joined by SteelCityUrbex during the explore so shout outs to them... Great explore with lots of graffiti and nostalgia to keep you busy on the explore highly recommended (just watch out for the pigeons). PICS And to end off... a roof shot! Nothing much has changed in it current day form, just some more graffiti.
  8. following the decline of industries Sheffield offers plenty interns of urban exploring... from abandoned breweries, redundant steel works and leisure sites. It's difficult to experience all this in a single outing therefore I have compiled this into three years of exploring the city. Having started out at relatively low level explores and advancing this further to more harder to reach buildings here are some of the most important abandoned buildings Sheffield offers. If not for the buildings themselves Sheffield's street art is an important part of the explore. Often explorers take to photography for the art which is of a high standard coming from a far to experience this. Historically the buildings offer more than the art its self... the buildings often dating back to the victorian era give great scope to capture real history of the city. Often buildings have either been destroyed or are in the process of this. Been able to capture the buildings in their original state albeit a derelict one captures the cities past... and more importantly the history of British industry. END
  9. In 1847, Joseph Watts of Dewsbury and William Stones (1827 -1894) of Sheffield began brewing together at the Cannon Brewery in Sheffield's Shalesmoor district near Kelham Island. ... He renamed it the Cannon Brewery after his original premises. Stones soon became one of the richest men in Sheffield and worked up until his death in 1894. A light coloured beer, named Stones Bitter, was produced in the early 1940’s and this soon became a popular choice amongst steel workers across Sheffield. Cannon Brewery grew significantly as its reputation increased and sales prospered, to the extent that new offices, stores, workshops and cellars were all improved and developed. At its peak, the brewery produced 50,000 hectolitres of cask conditioned Stones each year and many of Sheffield’s public houses developed close ties to the brewery and Stones Bitter. An on-site public house was also opened within Cannon Brewery in 1964, “ originally named ‘The Underground’, but renamed as ‘The Pig and Whistle’ to service both visitors and workers, and this can still be found today. Cannon Brewery was closed in 1999 following reports that were indicative of a substantial decline in the sale of cask ales. The owner of the site is a demolition contractor and has submitted an application seeking permission for his business, Hague Plant, to bulldoze the buildings on the 0.7 hectare plot which, in documents drawn up by R Bryan Planning, are described as being of utilitarian design and of no historic or architectural significance. The owner is keen to redevelop the former brewery but has said that it is not effectively marketable in its current state, especially as the high cost of demolition and potential decontamination, particularly from asbestos, are a deterrent to developers. Explore Been looking at this as a potential explore for sometime... The buildings and architecture are something else and anyone who's anyone on the Sheffield graffiti scene have decorated the building with some great pieces.. The former brewery is in poor condition but offers explorers a great opportunity to appreciate the history and architecture of the former brewery. A real shame when they decided to pull the building as this is a real part of Sheffields brewing past.. explore whilst you still have chance.. as this building offers plenty for all. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. and 16. Graffiti on site 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. My favourite pic I took of this place Le fin "Times have changed, the place in its current condition is trashed and flooded... (2018)"
  10. short vid of a back up splore few months back, nice artwork.
  11. History “Here in Sheffield we have a proud sporting heritage and it is important that we build upon that to create the right environment in which the sportsmen and women of the future can train, develop and thrive… But it isn’t just about the elite, it is about every man, woman and child in our city being fitter, healthier and enjoying physical activity” (Isobel Bowler, cabinet member for culture, sport and leisure at Sheffield council). Chapeltown Baths opened sometime at the beginning of the 1960s. Locally, the facility was very popular, especially among children, and many people have indicated that the place has played a big part in their lives. The baths also held regular swimming galas which always attracted large audiences as parents and guardians would flock to the stands to observe. However, despite the fondness for the centre, it was often regarded as being too small and outdated. One for the clubs that used the pool on a regular basis, for instance, had to establish a waiting list for the people wanting to join. New plans to redevelop the site into a larger, more modern, venue were launched by Sheffield Council sometime between 2010 and 2015. Plans for the new facility revealed that a two-storey extension would be added to the front of the existing building, to house a gymnasium, flexible activity/exhibition space and a community café. The aim was to create a welcoming and revitalised health and fitness centre for the local area. The main entrance was to be moved to the back of the current site where a large glazed atrium would be constructed, and, as for the pool itself, it was to be modernised and larger changing areas for both males and females were to be installed. Nevertheless, in the end the plans were scrapped as it was decided that the site was simply too small to revamp and in the long run would not offer value for money. After the original plans were abandoned, a plan to build a brand-new leisure centre was proposed. The new £7 million project was quickly accepted and construction of the facility began in 2015, up the road from the old site in High Green. The erection of the new leisure centre was said to have been one of the first leisure developments in Sheffield in over a decade. The Thorncliffe Recreation Centre is now open and most of the staff from Chapeltown Baths were said to have been moved over. Various reports suggest that the new pool is larger and has an extra lane, and that a new community has been established there. Although the new site does not have the same character, local residents generally seem happy with the new facility. As for the former Chapeltown Baths site, it has remained abandoned since the beginning of 2016. No plans have been set in stone yet; however, it is rumoured that the building will be demolished to make way for affordable housing. In the meantime, like most abandoned sites, the building has experienced increasing incidents of vandalism in recent months as local goons have managed to get their hands on a few brushes, several tins of Wilko One Coat and a box of safety matches. Smoke at the site was reported in March 2017, coming from the basement, and this resulted in the fire service being called to attend the scene. It is reported that they and had to cut their way into the building to extinguish a small fire. Fortunately, in this instance there was very little damage. As things stand presently, SCAFF Security Alarms Ltd. claim they have sealed the premises and installed various security systems to prevent any further vandalism. Our Version of Events With a couple of hours to kill before we hit some of Sheffield’s legendary pubs later that evening, we decided to pop across to Chapeltown and take a look at the old public swimming pool that had recently been brought to our attention. None of us have ever been to Chapeltown before and I can’t say we were expecting to discover anything amazing there, but one thing we did notice is that the townspeople aren’t doing themselves any favours in terms of attracting tourists to the area. For instance, there’s a large sign in the centre of the town that reads, ‘Fast trains to Sheffield and Barnsley’, implying that you should probably get going as soon as possible. However, we chose to ignore the advice and hang around for a little while instead. Finding the old swimming pool wasn’t particularly difficult. We sort of stumbled across it before needing to consult Google Maps for guidance. After that, we lingered around the bus stop that’s positioned right outside for a while, trying to work out why the metal shutter that should have been covering the main entrance looked like someone had had a go at it with a tin opener. At first, we were convinced that some incredibly ambitious explorer had decided to break in that way, rather than simply peel off a board. But, as we discovered later on, it turns out it was the firefighters who’d hacked a hole in the shutter. Even so, there was no evidence that they’d managed to get into the building that way – unless they had the keys to the building – because the front door behind it was still locked up tight. Fortunately, though, the shutter wasn’t the only opening the fire service had created. It is thanks to those guys, then, and their arsenal of cutting tools that we managed to get inside. Once inside the building, we didn’t have to worry about being spotted from the outside since all the windows at ground level had been boarded over. This made capturing images a bit easier because we could wave the torches around a bit. However, the downside to our visit was that we were a bit late getting to this one as the local goons have been inside and clearly they got a little bit overexcited. Hence why there’s a mountain of shit in the pool and broken glass everywhere. On the positive side, however, the fire damage was minimal, limited to a very small section of the basement area. In that sense, the rest of the building remains unscathed. All in all, it took us around forty minutes to cover the building from the basement to the loft. Afterwards, we left feeling satisfied that something new in Sheffield had turned up, but even more delighted that we were heading straight for The Fat Cat for no fewer than eight pints of Kelham Island’s finest and a plate of homemade curry. Many hours later, after an innumerable number of pints, two curries and several packets of peanuts, we staggered back out onto the streets of Sheffield. We were tempted to have a quick look at Minitron while we were so close, but since the lampposts on the other side of the street were swaying in a very unusual manner, we decided to call it a day and head back into town for one final pint before bed. Explored with Soul. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23: 24: 25: 26: 27:
  12. I had a few days off last month so decided to go to Dyson. As you can see it was quite foggy which made the whole thing feel pretty creepy, solo explore as well. lotta fun. I will be doing a revisit at some point and hopefully with a drone The building, in Sheffield, closed its doors in 2006 and since then the gutted remains have been left to rust. The Dyson Group, founded by John Dyson, opened their first factory in Sheffield in 1834 at the tail end of the Industrial Revolution, before later moving to this site. Using new software to edit videos so should be a big improvement in quality!
  13. History “The architecture and much of the decoration of St. Marie’s cathedral uses designs and motifs from English churches built before the Reformationâ€. The Cathedral Church of St. Marie is an English Roman Catholic Cathedral, located in Sheffield city centre. It was designed by Matthew Ellison Hadfield, a Victorian Gothic Revival architect who was well-known for his work on Roman Catholic churches, and constructed between 1846 and 1850. Before the cathedral was constructed, a smaller chapel existed on the same site; this was known as Sheffield’s Medieval Parish Church of St. Peter. During the reign of Henry VIII, St. Peter’s was destroyed and most of the Catholic priests were hunted down and murdered or imprisoned. The congregation, too, were socially excluded and faced loss of property and possessions. By the late 18th Century, however, Catholics were able to worship more freely in Sheffield (though not completely) and, subsequently, a small group of priests purchased a house (The Lord’s House which was built by the Duke of Norfolk) on the corner of Fargate and Norfolk Row; this was close to where the cathedral now stands. A new small chapel was discretely constructed in the back garden and the remaining land became a cemetery in later years when Catholic’s were legally allowed to practice their religion. Some parts of the original building continue to exist to this day. By 1846, the chapel was deemed too small for the number of worshippers attending on a regular basis, therefore, Fr. Pratt - a young priest who was becoming increasingly prominent in Sheffield – sought out Hadfield to design a larger building that could cater for the expanding city. Hadfield used the design of a 14th Century church in Heckington, Lincolnshire, to sketch plans for a new site of worship. Upon completion the church was expensively decorated; courtesy of the Duke of Norfolk, who supported the project with money and additional generous ornamental donations. Unfortunately, Fr. Pratt never witnessed the completion of the church because he died on 17th February 1849 (aged 38) whilst it was still being constructed. His body was initially buried at St. Bede’s, in Rotherham, along with all of the other people who were moved from the original cemetery. Yet, in spite of the decision to move Pratt to Bede’s, a stonemason, who had often heard Pratt suggest that he wanted to be buried at St. Marie’s, decided to secretly dig up the coffin and rebury it in a tomb near the newly positioned altar inside St. Marie’s. To this day, the body had remained in that same location. As above, St. Marie’s was completed in 1950 and it officially opened on September 11th. The cost of the church exceeded £10,500 and, despite the Duke’s support, it took almost forty years to pay off the debt. The Parish of St. Marie’s, which covered the whole of Sheffield, became part of the Diocese of Beverley in the same year when the Catholic Diocese were re-established for the first time since the Reformation. Like most churches and chapels, St. Marie’s was extended in later years (1902) as the congregation continued to grow. During the Second World War, however, all progress halted when a bomb blew out a number of the stained glass windows. To prevent the remaining ones from being destroyed, the church decided to remove the glass and store it in a shaft inside Nunnery Colliery for the duration of the war. In spite of these efforts, the mine flooded after unusually heavy rainfall and the stained glass sunk in mud; the drawings were also all destroyed. In 1947, however, some of the windows were rediscovered and the church were able to restore them. The church became a listed building in 1973, and later, on May 30th 1980, the New Diocese of Hallam was created; meaning St. Marie’s became a cathedral. Initially, St. Marie’s had been part of the Diocese of Leeds. Bishop Moverley was placed as its first bishop and he served until his death in 1996. Thereafter, Bishop Rt. Rev. Ralph Heskett was installed as the second Bishop of Hallam. Recently St. Marie’s has been awarded a Heritage Lottery Funded grant to conserve its heritage. The project will allow the conservation and long term preservation of the unaltered 19th Century Lewis organ, the highly decorated Victorian wall tiles and the 15th Century alabaster panels. Our Version of Events After a little wander around Sheffield, to see if the sites have changed at all, we spotted some new scaff and this time it was around the cathedral! Instantaneously, we gave in to temptation and set about creating some sort of plan. Ten minutes later, with the plan in full effect, we sat and enjoyed a beer and some food; waiting for the cover of darkness. After a few hours of that, later on that same evening, we set off once again, back to the cathedral. Once we arrived outside, we had to make sure we timed our entry carefully, in between passing pedestrians, but somehow we managed it without being seen. Although it’s normally quite quiet in Sheffield city centre, on this night everyone seemed to be out for a walk. After that we focused on climbing to the top. The climb itself wasn’t particularly challenging, but since you feel quite exposed as you get higher the thrill is certainly there. We did attempt to hide in the shadows where shadows were available, however, since it was a very clear night, there weren’t many around. At the top we were able to access the actual tower itself and could walk around the entire thing; this meant that we were able to see the old gargoyles and decorative features close up. The tower of the cathedral offers some fantastic views of Sheffield; yet another vantage point from which we could gaze at the city below. And yet, despite the awesome views, the highlight for myself was when the old clock bells chimed at a certain hour: they were loud and gave us a good taste of their music. Explored with Soul. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17:
  14. This was the first stop when we spent the day around Sheffield, 5 tried 5 entered. History - Sheffield Old Town Hall stands on Waingate in central Sheffield, England, opposite Castle Market. The building was commissioned to replace Sheffield's first town hall, which had opened in 1700 to a design by William Renny. This first structure stood by the parish church, on a site with little prospect for extension. The Old Town Hall was built in 1807–8 by Charles Watson, and was designed to house not only the Town Trustees but also the Petty and Quarter Sessions. The initial building was a five-bay structure fronting Castle Street, but it was extended in 1833 and again in 1866 by William Flockton (1804–1864) of Sheffield and his partner for the project, Abbott; the most prominent feature was the new central clock tower over a new main entrance that reoriented the building to Waingate. At the same time, the building's courtrooms were linked by underground passages to the neighbouring Sheffield Police Offices. Waingate in 1857: the Old Town Hall with its first clock tower on the left The first Town Council was elected in 1843 and took over the lease of the Town Trustees' hall in 1866. The following year, the building was extensively renovated, with a clock tower designed by Flockton & Abbott being added. By the 1890s, the building had again become too small, and the current Sheffield Town Hall was built further south. The Old Town Hall was again extended in 1896–97, by the renamed Flockton, Gibbs & Flockton, and became Sheffield Crown Court and Sheffield High Court. In the 1990s, these courts moved to new premises, and since at least 1997 to present, the building remains disused. In 2007, it was named by the Victorian Society as one of their top ten buildings most at-risk.
  15. How to post a report using Flickr Flickr seems to change every time the wind changes direction so here's a quick guide on how to use it to post a report... Step 1 - Explore and take pictures Step 2 - Upload your chosen pictures to Flickr like this.. Step 3 - Once your images are successfully uploaded to flickr choose a category for the location that you have visited... Step 4 - Then "Start New Topic".. You will then see this screen... Step 5 - Now you are ready to add the image "links", known as "BBcodes", which allow your images to display correctly on forums.. Step 6 - Then click "select" followed by "view on photo page".. Now select "Share" shown below.. Step 7-13 - You will then see this screen... Just repeat those steps for each image until you're happy with your report and click "submit topic"! You can edit your report for 24 hours after posting to correct errors. If you notice a mistake outside of this window contact a moderator and they will happily rectify the problem for you
  16. A cool night of climbing in Sheff with @-Raz- and a none member Butters Taken from the roof of Park Hill Flats Bit of History; The Cathedral Church of St Marie is the Roman Catholic cathedral in Sheffield, England. It lies in a slightly hidden location, just off the main shopping street in the city, but signals its presence with a 220ft tall spire. St Marie’s was completed in 1850 and opened on 11 September. Building the church cost more than £10,500 – a huge sum in those days – and it was not until 1889 that the church was free from debt. The Parish of St Marie’s, which covered the whole of Sheffield, became part of the Diocese of Beverley when Catholic diocese were re-established for the first time since the Reformation in 1850. In 1902 a new presbytery, now known as Cathedral House, was opened. During the Second World War a bomb blew out stained glass windows in the Blessed Sacrament chapel. The remaining windows were removed and stored in a shaft at Nunnery Colliery. The mine flooded during the war, the glass sunk in mud and drawings for re‑creating the windows were destroyed, however it was still possible to re-install the windows in 1947. When St Marie’s was re-ordered in 1970, following Vatican II, dark woodwork was removed and new lighting and benches were installed. In 1972, a new altar, allowing mass to be celebrated versus populum, was consecrated by Bishop Gerald Moverley, auxiliary Bishop of Leeds. The church building has been a Grade II listed building since 1973. On 30 May 1980 the new diocese of Hallam was created and St. Marie’s became a cathedral. Bishop Moverley was installed as its first bishop and served until his death in 1996. The Explore; So on a cold and windy Sunday night, having just ot my car back from repair, it was decided that this needed to be done. Parking on Park Hill we made our way to the roof for a quick warm up which turned out to be a cool down as it was fking freezing. A few quick shots from the top and we headed on down, but before leaving we popped our heads into the service tunnels, but i have a video of this so i'll leave that for another report Fast foward an hour, we are sat in McDonalds after having been foiled by passing pedestrians. Wolfing down burgers and sipping at those Vanilla Latte things they do which are simply brilliant! Enough about food. We arrive outside the church and its all quiet, so over the fence we go, pausing only on the other side for a man to pass by and we remain unnoticed. A few flights of stairs and we hit the roof, to find some people on the ground looking curiously at the fence, but they soon move on. Then came the punishing part, more ladders than i cared to count. Cold enough that your hards are numb within seconds and the higher we went the worse it got. As did the wind, as we neared the top we could feel the whole structure swaying beneath us in the breeze. Great fun. From the top we noticed 3 figures on a nearby rooftop, closer inspection reveals them to be the guys who were checking the Cathedral out as we were on the roof! Whoever you were boys, a pleasure to meet you And heres the pics; Thanks for looking
  17. Good Evening Everyone, Just a quick intro to myself, my name is Ben, and im the Photographer at B T Frewin Photography, hence my profile name, and i currently live in Rotherham. I am pretty much new to the whole urbex scene, but have a ton of experience with my camera and love a good explore. Im just reaching out to fellow rotherham/sheffield urban explores/photographers who wouldnt mind meeting oneday to explore new places and exsisting ones and hopefully get me fully into this. If so, drop me a messege. Cheers.
  18. The Visit I was told about this place by some pensioner explorers who loved the street art around Sheffield, set off the week after to have a look for ourselves. Set in a lovely little village, not much left inside now but some amazing street art in there! The History The water works was built in 1913 to filter and treat water taken from the Dale Dike (the cause of the 1864 great flood of Sheffield),and Agden reservoirs in the nearby Loxley Valley. The water works was cutting edge technology in it's time and it even had the first telephone to be installed in Bradfield back in 1930 apparently. In 1974 the Yorkshire Water Authority took over and then during the Thatcher government some years later, the entire UK water industry was privatised with the Water Act of 1989. The pumping house at Lower Bradfield was abandoned in 1994 when a new pump house and processing plant was built Further down the Loxley valley. According to the locals the building attracts unwanted visitors and is a constant eyesore and a morbid reminder of Lower Bradfields grim past. The only small remaining hints of the buildings past Now some stripped out rooms.. And finally, some of the best street art I've ever seen... Oh.. and a fun looking pigeon
  19. History Minitron is a short culvert that lies beneath Kelham Island. The entire island on which the brewery is now located is man-made, resulting from mill race in the 12th century (around 1180) when water from the River Don was required for power. The goit was created to carry water from the River Don all the way to Lady’s Bridge, where the Town Corn Mill – which belonged to the Lord of the Manor – was located. Only a small section continues to exist today. It is rumoured that the island is named after Kellam Homer, the town’s armourer and smithy in 1637 who owned a small workshop on the land. Homer was able to expand his premises on account of the goit, as he was able to set up a waterwheel for his grinding workshop on the island. In later years the diverted section of the river was also used to supply power to a number of other metalwork factories which emerged in the same area as the former corn mill. By the 1800’s, as the city of Sheffield expanded, the Kelham Island area and the island itself became a host for many different manufacturers. John Crowley was one notable figure who purchased the island in 1829. A small iron foundry, known as the Kelham Island Works, was constructed on the site and the premises soon became a popular producer of iron products; these ranged from things as diverse as lawn mowers, bicycles, corn grinders and decorative items. Due to the success of his business, Crowley moved to the Meadow Hall area in 1870. The site was subsequently bought by the City in the 1890s and most of the Iron Works Buildings were demolished to make way for an electricity generating station, to provide power to the City’s new tram system. During this time major changes occurred across the city and much of the original goit was redeveloped. The remaining sections were culverted over time, particularly after the 1930s when the power station was closed down, and the same buildings steadily became workshops and storage space once again. Those formers buildings now house the Kelham Island Museum and Brewery. Our Version of Events Like several others in Sheffield who have managed to get this explore under their belts, I’d been putting it off for a very long time. At one point I used to pass it most days of the week, but for some reason it still didn’t grab my attention enough to make it a priority. I think it’s was the scanty size of it that made me push this one under the carpet for so long. Nevertheless, one afternoon I randomly decided I really fancied seeing what it actually looked like down there. So, the very next day; a particularly rainy day at that, straight after work, I grabbed Soul, my waders and a camera and went to have a peek. When we arrived the area was still quite busy owing to the nearby pubs and coffee shops, so I can’t imagine we went unnoticed as we wadered up and climbed into the goit. Other than that, access was reasonably straightforward. Once inside we expected the first section to be fairly easy-going, which it was. It was further on where we imagined that we would face some difficulty, in the first open section where a fair amount of foliage has grown. This too, however, was easier to get through than we’d anticipated. Before we knew it we were inside Minitron itself, and to begin with the walk was pleasant; both ankle deep and flat. As we progressed forwards though, we suddenly became very aware of the silt, and the fact that every step we took forward, the deeper it seemed to get. At this stage you couldn’t stand around too long since the silty muck held onto our waders tightly. It took some wrestling and pulling to get ourselves unstuck every now and then. On the whole Minitron is a classic old-brick-style underworld with some contemporaneous spray-over concrete repair work, and, while it lacks any real length, its large arches are certainly something to see. The very end offers a little treat too, past the second opening, when you reach the modern diversion which leads into the River Don. At the end of this modern pipe you reach two metal gates which open out onto the river itself and from here the views are pretty cool. I’d always wondered if there was anything under the canopy-like structure by the side of the river. Now, I guess I know exactly what’s there. Explored with Soul. 1: Entering Minitron 2: The First Open Section 3: The First Stone Archway 4: A Side Passageway 5: Minitron 6: Looking Back at the Two Arches 7: Soul Enjoying Himself 8: The Concrete Spray-Over Section 9: Concrete 10: The Second Open Section 11: Entering the Newer Section 12: The Fall 13: The New Concrete Section 14: Trying to Dodge Many Spiders... 15: The River Don 16: The Finale: The Two Gates
  20. The Visit This was unfortunately one of them explores that has lots of potential but somehow just doesn't live up to expectations. See what you guys think anyway The History This old school building was designed by the architects Innocent and Brown and opened in 1875. In 2003 the school was moved to a new, purpose-built building on Andover Street, built on the former St Catherine's RC Primary School site. The original school building is now Grade II listed. It stands in a prominent position on the hillside with great views across the city with plans to convert it into apartments.
  21. The Visit I've been wanting to see this place for a while now and just never got around to going over.. seemed to be a day of tight squeezes after the church in Leeds but we got in OK.. a lot of the actual industrial gear is gone now unfortunately but the offices, medical rooms and air raid shelter are quite interesting and worth a look I'd say.. Running water still on was a nice touch and able to have a nice wash before we left The History Sheffield manufacturing firm that collapsed into administration with the loss of nearly 80 jobs owes more than £500,000 to creditors, it has been revealed. More than 140 local and national companies are owed money in the wake of the collapse of Castmaster Roll, based at the Eagle Foundry in Attercliffe. The business went into administration in October and as no new buyer could be found, all 78 workers have lost their jobs and the firm’s assets are being sold. The firm had reported a trading loss for three years in a row before going into administration, including a £400,000 loss for the year ending January 31, 2014. Details included in the papers of administrator KPMG show £502,353 was owed to different companies at the time of administration. The report said delayed and non-payment of invoices had put the company under ‘significant pressure from its creditors’ in the months prior to administration. A report also reveals that between KPMG’s appointment in October and December 5, it claimed costs of more than £324,000 for handling the administration. KPMG said it is uncertain how much money – if any – will be returned to unsecured creditors as a sale of assets is yet to be concluded. Administrators have also said they are ‘continuing to assess the causes of the company’s failure’. It comes after Sheffield MP Clive Betts called for a ‘thorough investigation’ into how Castmaster Roll failed. The Sheffield South East MP said staff had told him the company appeared to be in good shape before it went into administration. He said: “I’m calling on the administrators to undertake a thorough investigation into how a company with good order books and more orders coming through the door has sadly managed to get into such difficulties.†The firm produced iron and steel quality rolls, discs and sleeves for the manufacturing and food processing industry. The Stevenson Road site began making gas lamps more than a century ago and became a roll maker about 95 years ago. It was known as the Davy Roll company but, after going into receivership, it was reborn as Castmaster Roll in the mid-2000s, taken over by new owner Mel Farrar. The Industrial Areas Offices, Medical Room and Air Raid Shelter
  22. This was one of the sites we did on a full day in Sheffield. We bumped in to come pensioners at this site who explore but mainly for the street art. History Stones Brewery (William Stones Ltd) was a regional brewery founded in 1868 by William Stones in Sheffield, West Riding of South Yorkshire, England and purchased by Bass Brewery in 1968. After its closure in 1999 its major brand, Stones Bitter, has continued to be produced by the Molson Coors Brewing Company.
  23. The Visit Having tried this one a few months back with Funlester and being completely baffled by how to get in the place I returned with a non member armed with a little more intel and determination paid off this time This is one of those explores that you really can feel the history of the place I thought.. can just imagine what a hive of activity it must have been in its day. The History George Barnsley & Sons Ltd was founded in 1836 and were originally situated on Wheeldon Street, Sheffield. By 1849 they had moved to the Cornish Works, which were much larger premises. They specialised in the manufacture of files and cutting tools for use in the shoe making industry. There are a number of family names that are known to have deep roots in the Sheffield area, and the Barnsley name is undoubtedly one of them. In 1650 George Barnsley became Master Cutler, a role fulfilled by another George Barnsley in 1883. This George Barnsley was of the second generation of the firm of George Barnsley and Sons, toolmakers. The business grew to become the world's leading producer of tools for shoemakers. The technological revolution of the 20th century saw a decline in the need for traditional tools. George Barnsley's survived until 2003 when the premises finally closed.
  24. This place has now been turn in to an Airsoft building so tyres everywhere and not much else apart from the main door. History - What is now known as The Stanley Tools Factory, Sheffield was built in the 1850’s. At the moment it is derelict awaiting refurbishment. It is 100,000 Sq.ft in size and is spread over a 4 floor factory and a 2 floor office block. Stanley Tools took over from the Chapman Brace and Drill Factory in 1937. The site has been used as a film set recently and has also been used for zombie experiences due to the size of the location.
  25. This was the 3rd stop on our trip on Sunday. Was ok but then found the First Aid Room and the Air Raid Shelter Thing History - A Sheffield manufacturing firm that collapsed into administration with the loss of nearly 80 jobs owes more than £500,000 to creditors, it has been revealed. More than 140 local and national companies are owed money in the wake of the collapse of Castmaster Roll, based at the Eagle Foundry in Attercliffe. The business went into administration in October and as no new buyer could be found, all 78 workers have lost their jobs and the firm’s assets are being sold. The firm had reported a trading loss for three years in a row before going into administration, including a £400,000 loss for the year ending January 31, 2014. Details included in the papers of administrator KPMG show £502,353 was owed to different companies at the time of administration. The report said delayed and non-payment of invoices had put the company under ‘significant pressure from its creditors’ in the months prior to administration. A report also reveals that between KPMG’s appointment in October and December 5, it claimed costs of more than £324,000 for handling the administration. KPMG said it is uncertain how much money – if any – will be returned to unsecured creditors as a sale of assets is yet to be concluded. Administrators have also said they are ‘continuing to assess the causes of the company’s failure’. It comes after Sheffield MP Clive Betts called for a ‘thorough investigation’ into how Castmaster Roll failed. The Sheffield South East MP said staff had told him the company appeared to be in good shape before it went into administration. He said: “I’m calling on the administrators to undertake a thorough investigation into how a company with good order books and more orders coming through the door has sadly managed to get into such difficulties.†The firm produced iron and steel quality rolls, discs and sleeves for the manufacturing and food processing industry. The Stevenson Road site began making gas lamps more than a century ago and became a roll maker about 95 years ago. It was known as the Davy Roll company but, after going into receivership, it was reborn as Castmaster Roll in the mid-2000s, taken over by new owner Mel Farrar.
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