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  1. Hi all, We went and visited a WW2 Shelter last night on the outskirts of London. The place was absolutely incredible and even had left behind remnants. We found it that it had been unsealed again so we decided to set off straight away as we did not want to miss this chance. I hope you enjoy the video! HISTORY: I couldn't find to much however the shelter was built on the grounds of Cane Hill Asylum around the time of WW2. There were also another 3 tunnels built at the same time. Sometime after the war the tunnels were bought by a specialist manufacture of optical devices which included mainly lenses for large telescopes. The Company left the site in the early 70s to then go on and finish trade in 1978. It basically then turned into a tipping site for old car parts until they were sealed up by the local council.
  2. History W. T. Henley was a cable/wire company that was founded in a small London-based workshop in 1837. William Thomas Henley is famous for having converted his old lathe into a wiring covering machine which was used to cover wire with silk and cotton as this was in high demand at the time for electromagnetic apparatus. It is reported that Henley’s company progressed at an impressive rate and that he pioneered the submarine cable field (laying cables on the sea bed between land-based stations to carry telecommunication signals across stretches of ocean).It was Henley’s dream that all of civilisation would eventually be linked together telegraphically. As WT Henley’s Telegraph Works continued to prosper, Henley decided to purchase a factory at North Woolwich beside the Thames in 1859 for £8,000. It is said that this development led to the laying of the Persian Gulf telegraph cable which is 1615 miles long, for the Indian Government. As a result, by the end of 1873 Henley’s Woolwich site had spread to cover some sixteen acres and his company also included three cable laying ships and a four-hundred-foot wharf to allow five-hundred-ton ships to load and unload their cargo. Sadly, Henley died in 1882; however, his company continued to grow in his absence and went on to form branches across the country. By 1906 work on a new factory in Gravesend was completed. The new factory is said to have been an impressive development and it included extensive, purpose-built, laboratories and a modern reinforced concrete air-raid shelter under London Road that could hold approximately two-thousand people. The tunnels were built into old caves within the Rosherville Gardens – an area of land located between the cable works and the cliff face. It is likely that the air-raid shelter was factory-owned but also open to the public as Henley’s company did not actually own Rosherville Gardens at the time and it featured a number of amenities and six entrances. Henley’s company continued to thrive as the Victorian era ended; however, its success can be linked directly to the Great War as it was a catalyst for technological and industrial development and change. By the Second World War, Henley’s company was publicly praised for its contribution towards King and Country – particularly its contribution to ‘Operation Pluto’ (the construction of petrol pipelines across the English Channel). Despite this success, a decision was made to close the main Henley factory at Woolwich due to the repeated damaged it suffered during the war years. A new factory was subsequently built at Birtley in the North East due to its reputation for being a ‘misty valley’ that made it difficult for the Luftwaffe to target factories, and this was completed in 1950. Sadly, a change of events occurred in 1958 when AEI acquired Henley’s company, having already taken over Siemens Bros in 1953. However, AEI is now the world’s oldest cable company and recently celebrated its one-hundred and seventy-fifth anniversary. Unfortunately, Henley’s Gravesend site was closed in 2008, though, due to it being ‘no longer viable to operate because of strong European competition’. Our Version of Events Not much by way of events for this one. It’s been a very busy few months and we ended up here to take a break after doing a spot of house viewing. Since we’d spent all day and most of the evening looking at damp, shitty rental properties that all looked as though they ought to be photographed and placed as reports on here, we arrived outside AEI in the early hours of the morning. Armed only with the essentials, our tripods, cameras and cans of Stella Artois, we made our way over the epic bog that you have to cross to find the entrance to the old shelter. We really underestimated how muddy this bit of wasteland was going to be to be honest and very nearly ended up taking a cold midnight mud bath several times. Nevertheless, we eventually made it across, with all our beers intact you’ll be happy to know. From this point onwards, getting into the old shelter was pretty straightforward. Once inside, we immediately set about taking our snaps. There was a shared feeling among us that the heavy feeling of tiredness was impending so we wanted to get the hard bit of the explore out of the way quickly. It didn’t really take long to photograph the place in the end though, once we’d worked out the general layout of the structure which is a grid-like setup. This left us with plenty of time to each pull up a chemical toilet and enjoy a few bevvies. And that’s how it ended. The tins were cracked and we sat wondering what it would have felt like to hear explosions outside and the thunder of guns shaking the paint and dirt from the ceiling. In reality, all we could really hear was a superb silence and the odd drip coming from a room to our left. What better way to finish an explore, with beers in hand and an abundance of chemical toilets at the ready. Explored with Ford Mayhem. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21:
  3. Now home to the local pigeon population this small deep shelter was built to protect troops of the nearby Z-Rocket from incoming axis bombs during WWII. There was two main entrances down into the shelter and one emergency escape exit. All in all, a great little splore, one of many in the area. Un-lined section which leads to the emergency escape exit. Wardens room/office, with the un-lined section in the distance. Main tunnels are lined with steel girders braced with corrugated steel sheet. Toilets. Steps leading up towards main entrance, now infilled with bricks and rubble. The original timber and plywood lining still remains, although damaged and decomposing. Last but by no means least...
  4. After a long drive stuck on the glorious M25 for hours on end, the Grove air raid shelters were nearby so took my chance for a quick solo mooch. I have to be honest, these have been on my list for quite some time but wondering around the tunnels the place became somewhat repetitive so I did not walk as far down the shelters as I could as they felt almost endless. None the less, it was great to finally see the shelter and a nice surprise to see graffiti at a minimum, despite nothing other than broken chairs, rusty buckets and a lot of spiders within the shelter.
  5. Lovely trip to see this place; I think its been a while since it was photographed. Sometimes you often find yourselves questioning why we do the things we do… today was no exception. Migraines, hidden holes, rubble every where and bad air! not to mention the occasional squeeze Still had to be done and feel very fortunate to have seen this place, Despite the state of me and the location! Bit O history.. There was a prevailing mood in the Government against deep shelters being built for the protection of large numbers of civilians. Their effectiveness from high explosive bombs was questioned, based on reports of their performance in the Spanish Civil War, and there were also concerns about costs. The Government’s preference for almost two decades had been for smaller, dispersed shelters, and so the large deep shelters that went ahead all had very specific causes, such as their being in areas with previously excavated mines and tunnels, or eminently suitable geological conditions, or even very determined local authorities who were willing to risk losing government grants to build the shelters they wanted. However when the Blitz started in the autumn of 1940 policy changed and permission was granted for the two large civilian shelters Grant funding was generous given the need to protect the skilled workers. The shelter was in the side of the hill allowing access at grade into two main entrances, while at the uphill end a 25m ventilation shaft was sunk, doubling up as an emergency escape via a series of steep metal ladders. The tunnels in between these ends were cut out in a familiar gridiron layout, with four long perpendicular tunnels fed at both ends from the two main entrances, and eleven cross tunnels. Toilets, a canteen, and a first aid post were provided either in the cross tunnels or at tunnel intersection nodes. Within this 1596 bunks and 793 seats were provided for those lucky enough to have the requisite shelter permit. Construction began in December 1941 and was largely completed within a year, having suffered from escalating costs, geological problems, an unskilled labour force, and also paradoxically trespassers and vandalism. The original intention was that the tunnels would be 2.1m wide and 2.0m high with an arched roof, but the surviving tunnels are considerably larger than this. Records indicate that the considerable height came about following roof trimming required in the latter stages of the project due to the softness of the rock and problems with instability after exposure to the air. The shelter, like many of the deep shelters reluctantly approved by the Government, came too late to provide mass protection during the periods of heaviest bombing. After the war it was used for customs and excise storage, fire brigade training, and was even considered for Cold War use but rejected due to extensive dry rot. The Local Borough Council visited in the 1950’s to see if they could find a use for it, but disapprovingly recorded it to be “damp, dark and featureless” and it has been sealed in recent times. Local groups in the last decade have looked at ways of reopening it as a tourist attraction, and hopefully one day will be successful. Thanks for looking More pics http://www.the-elusive.uk/
  6. Hi all, I'm new to Oblivion State, but I've been doing Urban Exploring for about 18 months now. Here is my latest explore from late last night. Coulsdon Deep Shelter This was the site of my first proper Urban Explore about 18 months ago. I remember scrabbling through the woods one October night with some friends (that I think were quite convinced I was trying to get them killed) trailing behind me to try and find the way in. Eventually of course we made it in and it was all worth it. I of course had no idea what I was really doing, I don't think any of use really do when we start this rather weird hobby. Neither the less, 18 months later and I'm still hooked (and somewhat poorer with all the camera equipment I've bought). I heard that this the shelter had been sealed up with a massive pile of dirt back in the middle of last year. However a few months later there was a report up in October saying it was back open again. So I made a mental note to go re-visit when I got a chance. History The History has been said many time about this locations, so I won't go into great detail. You can get a very detailed write up anyway if you look this shelter on Google, so I'm not going to try and compete with that. It was constructed in 1941 It was bough by Cox, Hargreaves and Thomson Ltd, a manufacturing company that made Optical Equipment. They operated from the 1950s to the 1960s. However the moisture and cold made the tunnel unusable for manufacturing high precision equipment. It was bought by a motor vehicle repair company but they moved out for the same reasons sometime later. It was sealed up and left for years before being opened up at sometime later. The Visit I tried to find 'the usual' way in, but as reported a massive (Its truly massive, it would take a digger hours to clear it all away) mound of dirt and bricks was piled on top of it. Anyway, we dug about with sticks a bit to try and work out how someone got in previously, but gave up after a short while. We started to head back in defeat before accidentally stumbling across a totally new way in. Compared to 18 months ago, not much has really changed in the shelter. The only new thing is the bright pink speakers and DJ mixer that have been left in there from rave some people must have had in there. There was actually cable going into the entrance from outside, so I am assuming they ran a small generator outside and ran the power inside for the speakers. Pretty clever IMO. Full album here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/grahamr123/albums/72157661916861733
  7. Dear All, This is my first post on Oblivisionstate even though I have been a member on the Fb page for a while, I thought it was about time I uploaded my photographs on here! You will see that alot of my uploads will be in black and white as this is my preferred medium, with some editing. I thought I would begin with my visit to The Grove Air Raid Shelter back in november 2014. I have only included 3 images, as all to see were a series of tunnels. There were 6 entrances in total, which can be found via the grounds of a prestigious hotel, by this point alot of the entrances to the tunnels had been blocked up as you can see by the 3rd image, so there was abit of hunting to find one which hadn't been bricked up. The tunnels were relatively easy to find, I visited during night in the hope to catch some bats in these tunnels, unfortunately I didn't encounter any. All that was left in the tunnels were some broken benches and rubbish! I hope you enjoy my post and expect more from me coming soon! Some background: The London, Midland and Scottish (LMS) Railway, with some foresight one presumes, bought a large area of land near Watford along with it's now disused Manor House for use as their HQ in the event of a war, away from their current HQ in Euston Station. As events transpired, by Easter 1939 with the on going approach of WW2, the move had started in earnest, being known as Project X. The full report/history of this place can be found here: http://rastall.com/grove/projectx.html 1. 2. 3.
  8. Hi! This is one of our air raid shelters, it's situated under the city center and has modern filling in it. That's all, have nice trips!
  9. As Hitler's bombs rained down, thousands of people were forced underground for shelter,about 1,200ft of shelter was built to protect them. The murals were first discovered back in 2005.. Splored in 2011 Thanks....
  10. Morning everyone, managed to finally see this place after waiting for a long time, it was the final deep shelter around the dover area that i hadnt seen so i was pretty happy, nice shelter but stinks of wee wee up the top part and it has been really burnt out at some point but there is still some nice features down there with the pipework etc, pics are resized so dont look too good but hope there ok anyway :-). i need a wide angle lens. also its now sealed up again. Brief bit of history: St Martin's Battery was constructed in the 1870s and mounted with three 10-inch RML guns. It is located overlooking Dover's Western Docks, in an area which would have been just inside the South Entrance of the Western Heights fortress. Directly behind the battery is the deep shelter. This was constructed originally as a main magazine to supply the battery guns, but was lengthened and turned into a deep shelter at the time of world war 2. The deep shelter is now in poor condition, many parts having suffered from smoke damage and collapse. thank alan.
  11. Former Keighley College 6 Lord Street Keighley, West Yorkshire BD21 3DB http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2345327/World-War-Two-bomb-shelter-space-scores-people-college-car-park.html Gotta be worth a look ?
  12. This was the one and only Deep Shelter at St Margaret's that I hadn't done, Mainly as in previous years I hadn't found it, I got a text from Space Invader saying he was at a loose end and did I fancy going and doing some thing local, I thought yeah why not so off we went and found ourselves here. A nice aerial shot of the site; A bit of history about the site, Its construction and the fire power employed; This was a coastal artillery battery with four Mark X 9.2 inch guns and a network of bunkers and ammunition stores, northeast of the lighthouse on the road to St Margarets. The site was cleared after the war, but traces remain albeit heavily overgrown. Excavations started on 28 December 1940 and the first gun arrived on 25 March 1941, although No. 4 gun was not test fired until 28 November of that year. Their best-known action came a few months later, on 12 February 1942, when the light battleships Gneisenau, Scharnhorst and the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen attempted the Channel Dash from Brest back to Germany. The K band radar at South Foreland started to track the ships of the Brest Group coming up the Channel towards Cap Gris Nez. At 12:19, the first salvo was fired; since maximum visibility was five miles, there was no observation of fall of shot by either sight or radar. The "blips" of the K-set clearly showed the zig-zagging of the ships and full battery salvo firing began without verifying fall-of-shot. 33 rounds were fired at the German ships, which were moving out of range at 30 kn (35 mph; 56 km/h). Initially it was thought that four hits had been made, but the Germans revealed that all had missed. By the end of the war the four guns had expended 2,248 shells, most in the months before and after the Normandy landings. 28 enemy ships were confirmed sunk between all the coastal batteries around Dover and the deterrent effect was significant A couple of Original photos from when the site was in full operation And the pics taken from my visit to the Shelter Thanks for taking the time to look through my Pics, I had a great time visiting this place, I would Highly recommend going to experience it for yourselves ! !
  13. This is the first of two deep shelters that were built at south foreland. This particular shelter was excavated in 1941 by 172 Tunnelling Coy and No.1 Section, 171 Tunnelling Coy. R.E. to provide accommodation and shelter to the gun crews at the Battery site. Really liked it down this one,been to quite a few deep shelters and this one doesn't have much graffiti which is nice, the general condition isnt too bad but most of the wall linings etc have fallen off making a bit of a mess but one of the tunnels is spotless so i guess someone's been having a sweep up down there at some point. didnt spend too much time down there as was in a rush and went on to do another 3 explores that night but i think the pics came out ok. thanks for looking alan.
  14. everyones probably seen these many times before but i Popped in here yesterday on the way back from visiting deepdene deep shelter but there's already a new report on that so thought id post up a few pics from my 2nd explore. had been down here before but the mrs wanted too see it so went for a revisit. bit of info: coulsdon deep shelter was built on the grounds of the cane hill asylum around the time of ww2, it was one of four shelters which surrey council had built, After the war Cox, Hargreaves and Thomson, Limited who specialised in the manufacture of optical devices – mainly lenses for huge telescopes purchased the shelter. they left the shelter due to damp issues and corrosion and the shelter was then purchased to be used as a garage but with the same issues happening again left and the shelter was finally sealed up by surrey council. nice little explore but the same as deepdene a fair bit of asbestos laying about. thanks for looking Alan.
  15. My second underground explore after visiting Z-Rocket earlier that morning. Very steep entrance with not much to hang onto but has some good pieces still in it. Some history: This deep shelter sunk into the chalk above Langdon Bay just to the east of Dover had two entrances about a hundred yards apart in a bank by a rough track well back from the cliff edge (the cutting for the railway line that used to run down to Dover Harbour many years ago). There are no signs of the entrances today. The roofs/walls were the usual galvanized wriggley sheet metal, but with quite a lot of brick work. In one section where the chalk was exposed an inscription, 'M. Tutt Dec 1944', had been cut quite deeply into the chalk. The steps leading out of the secondary (eastern) entrance were largely missing leaving a steeply sloping chalk floor leading back to the surface which was back filled in 1979.
  16. This was my first underground explore and loved every minute of it. A big thank you to AlanMowbs82 for some help with the entrance Some stolen history: The Site is located under the 5.5 gun battery constructed during world war 2, this battery no longer remains having been demolished in the 1970s. The Deep shelter however still remains. This gunsite mounted 4 x 5.5" guns and was manned by 411 Battery. Tunnelled accommodation was provided at the rear of the Battery, and an extra chamber between the two parallel tunnels was later added by 171 Tunnelling Coy. as additional space for the medical services.there are hazards such as unsupported sections of the tunnels as well as a chute that opens directly into the face of the cliff. Thanks for looking.
  17. second visit for me down to Lydden as a couple missed out on it the last time, access route has become slightly more worrying, guess that was due to the rain! dont really like revisits but what we saw when we got out was breath taking history can be found here: http://www.subbrit.org.uk/sb-sites/sites/l/lydden_spout_battery/index.shtml this is my favorite place in dover, not very trashed and a sketchy entrance
  18. Afternoon everyone we had a long day exploring yesterday and visited 4 places so im acheing like crazy today, anyway in between explores i popped back down into the z rocket for another look, still like it down their although its a small explore but nice all the same :-). the crazy pidgeons are still there waiting to fly into your head when you least expect it but it keeps you on your toes haha. just a few pictures incase everyone hasnt seen them a thousand times. a little history on the place: The Site is located under the 5.5 gun battery constructed during world war 2, this battery no longer remains having been demolished in the 1970s. The Deep shelter however still remains. This gunsite mounted 4 x 5.5" guns and was manned by 411 Battery. Tunnelled accommodation was provided at the rear of the Battery, and an extra chamber between the two parallel tunnels was later added by 171 Tunnelling Coy. as additional space for the medical services.there are hazards such as unsupported sections of the tunnels as well as a chute that opens directly into the face of the cliff. thanks for looking alan.
  19. Ventured out with Skeleton Key, Lara and Laird Tam We had got a tip off abut a shaft under Harlow but we didn't have a clue what it was, it had us stumped for a couple of weeks and I even emailed Subbrit I knew I should have just asked my Nan!!! Not only did my wise old Nan know about it, she's been in it several times!!! It turns out that the owner of Netteswell House was a Mr Lauritzen, he was the owner of Lauritzen Water Treatment, I knew my Nan worked for him when I was a kid but I only remember her working in building that was in Old Harlow Well it turns out that during the war years Mr Lauritzen had some outbuildings at the rear of Netteswell House that his staff worked in The Bunker was his private Air Raid Shelter, my Nan said that when the siren sounded then all the workers along with Mr Lauritzen and the staff of the house would go into the shelter, apparently it had lighting and benches and they would stay in there until the all clear was given and then they would return to work They would go in through the main door from the apple orchard and the shaft that we entered by was the emergency exit. When I told my Nan that we got about 60 foot into it she said that was about it, so it appears that behind the bricks would be a bit of mud and then the wall that joins the car park at the top of a newer housing estate __________________ The basic layout is like this. At the bottom of the shaft there was a small drop, about 2 foot and then you were in the main area, this was about 20 metres long and then you reached a doorway this led to the 2nd chamber which was only about 6 foot square and then the bricked up doorway. The door with the rusty reinforced bars was in this 2nd chamber so I'm guessing that it came from the bricked up doorway I have a short video of the place here.........
  20. This is the former private home of the Lieutenant Governor of the Plymouth Garrison, built in 1793. Winston Churchill stayed there. He visited Plymouth in 1941, to see at first hand the effects of the Luftwaffe’s bombing campaign on the city. King George IV also stayed there, but its secret history lies in a two-mile warren of underground tunnels. They are entered via a bunker built in 1940, its seven-feet reinforced concrete roof designed to withstand a 500lb bomb direct hit. The tunnels, now damp and eerily dark in places, reek of military history. You pass old mess rooms and briefing areas, canteens and abandoned telecoms centres, all secured by foot-thick steel doors. Until a decade ago, this subterranean world was full of 200 naval staff working 24-7. Even the people of Plymouth did not know of the cloak-and-dagger operations engineered from below their land. It was where model ships were moved across tables to monitor naval manoeuvres in the Western Approaches at the end of the Second World War. Nor did Plymouthians know that the tunnels were a nerve centre of secret intelligence and telecommunications guiding naval operations during the Falklands War in 1982. Currently this site is under development for a new housing estate.
  21. StaffordShire has a wealth of miltary stuffs dotted around the place, I cant seem to go on a walk these days without finding some evidence of our past dotted around the place; thought I'd share some my discoveries.... Brick pillbox, Still in good condition side of layby near cannock chase. This pillbox was here as the nearby bridge is one of the few in the country that had the capability of taking the weight of the tanks. Ivy shot! The net one is Pillbox ~22 I believe, hexagonal pillbox with central concrete section to help with ricochet. This ones near newport and easily visible from the ode' google earth Then i found a sealed sunken pillbox and out building.. which was the first ever fail I found Then.... Testament to how "SPECIAL" I am te hee i walk past an allotments all the time and i thought that at the side of it was an old brick BBQ.... Not a bbq.. Writing on the door Its a Teeny Weeny Ickle one..
  22. Someone mentioned that this shelter was to be sealed..Sounded like bollox to me but this has appeared If you havnt seen it then you may be to late! later to this i found this pic on facebook the bloke seems genuine enough and is hoping for a good reaction to this and people are welcome to offer any help with prepairing this his contact details are... If you have any queries email [email protected] FAO Jon Barker.
  23. Quick visit, organised by someone down in Rochester. It was good to get back here as this was the second or third place I ever visited. Photos: We broke away from the group as to get clear photos, so we bombed it down to the old factory and worked our way fro there.. Heading back into the Air Raid Shelter Group Shot! Was good to get back!
  24. I've not been underground for 5 days and was starting to get the shakes, my eyes had adapted to being above ground and my skin was no longer translucent so I had to find somewhere dark and cool to hide from the midday sun As I was in Stockport I decided on Brinksway deep level shelter Wardens post Toilets
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