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Found 111 results

  1. Chateau Marianne / Chateau Alchimiste History Not much history on this location but it was rumoured to be have been once occupied by a former professor. The chateau is located in a small, rural town in France. The town's residents have halved in the last 40 years and it was beginning to look quite run down. I can imagine the nickname 'Alchimiste' (which means Alchemist in French) came from all the chemistry equipment left behind such as: test tubes, syringes, bottles, cylinders and beakers. It seems the previous inhabitant was also a bit of an artist, we found many paintings scattered around the house and a large collection in the attic, as well as a small studio in an upstairs room. Visit I visited this beautiful chateau on a euro trip with @PROJ3CTM4YH3M. We went the previous night to check to see if it was accessible and boy we were in for a shock! Neither of us realised how much stuff had been left and how interesting the contents were. We both particularly liked the framed butterfly collection which was hung up in one of the living rooms, as it reminded us of the film 'Silence of the Lambs.' After a short investigation we decided to return the following day and booked a hotel in a nearby town. Arriving the next morning once sun had risen, the place was really brought into it's element. So, as always, hope you enjoy my photos! If you got this far, thanks for reading.
  2. Hi mates, I want to share with you the exploration of an abandoned mansion in Spain witha a 360º camera. Move your mouse to see whatever you want in the vid!
  3. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. A former ballhaus somewhere in the eastern of Germany. At the moment they are renovating the building and for a small amount of money you can get acces for taking photographs.
  4. Campina Youth House Haven't seen this one posted anywhere so I decided to chuck a quick report up on it. I would say this particular location could be described as disused rather than abandoned, as it looked like there was redevelopment work going on when we arrived. Hence why it is so nice and pristine. Anyway, onto a little bit of history I found.. History The Youth House was orginally built as a leisure centre in Campina. A city situated roughly around the South East of Romania. It was constructed by local authorites in order to create a space for young people to participate in a range of sporting activities such as: aerobics, matrial arts and boxing. It was also established in order to promote culture and education and the house provided various facilities for the arts. The Youth House hosted a large auditorium to showcase fairs, exhibitions, conventions, concerts and festivals. Visit Visited with @darbians and Gina on a long weekend trip to Romania. We were driving past and saw what we orginally thought was a hotel and decided to check it out. Finding this place was defintely an unsuspected susprise and I'm very glad we decided to pull over. I really enjoyed photographing this one and I espiecally liked the mosiacs which reminded me of the ones at Buzludzha I had seen the previous year. I hope you enjoy my report! When you find a window open on the top floor, gotta get a few photos from the roof Thanks for reading!
  5. Villa Scorpio History Unfortunately I couldn't find a great deal of history surrounding this location but from what I have gathered it was built at some point during the late 19th century. The former occupier owned a large cement factory in the same town. I would imagine the family were quite well off, as it was very grand and exquisite building. The design of the villa shared various similarities with the Art Nouveau style of architecture. Featuring a stunning staircase, a beautiful skylight and an decorative greenhouse. Our visit Visited with @darbians and @vampiricsquid on our tour of Italy last summer. As soon as we arrived outside, we knew it was going to be a good explore. Hope you enjoy my photos! Externals Internals
  6. Mineral Springs Bath House History The construction of the Mineral Springs Bath House began in 1907. This was in order to bring in more tourism and wealth into the area. The town it was built in was an excellent location to host a bath house, as it was well known for it's rich mineral water sources which was believed to have medicinal properties. During the start of the 20th century mineral baths were a very fashionable and popular leisure activity. It took 3 years to build, with the help of local residents and neighbouring villages. It was finally unveiled with a ceremony in 1911. The materials which were used for the interior were designed in Vienna, France and Belgium and it was the most expensive healing bath in Bulgaria at that current time. Typical to most bath houses, it was separated into two sections, one for the men and another for the women. Both areas accommodated for it's visitors with a large circular pool, changing rooms and 10 bathtubs. The baths also provided central heating facilities, the main parts of the building were kept consistently at 15°C, the changing rooms at 28°C and the baths themselves were 32°C. The bath house was also equip with a clinic, admin offices and a large laundry room. Sadly the Mineral Springs Baths eventually closed in 2001, due to the decline in interest and popularity along with the lack of investment by the local government. Visit As always, visited with @darbians on a long weekend trip to Bulgaria. We were both feeling pretty optimistic once we'd seen the grand looking exterior on arrival and fortunately the interior certainly lived up to our expectations. Externals Internals If you've got this far, thanks for reading
  7. Did you ever went to an Island full of creepy dolls??? NO??? Let me take you with you! On my holiday in December 2017 to Mexico I heard about this place so I had to go. There is no holiday without finding some decayed stuff! The story goes as followed: The guy who lives on this Island found a girl who was drowned around the island. He also found a doll floating nearby and, assuming it belonged to the deceased girl so he hung it on a tree as a sign of respect. After he did that he heard whispers and foodsteps around his hut where he lived. He started to collect and hang more and more old dolls to calm down the spirit of the drowned girl. In 2001 the owner of the Island died and was found on the same spot where the girl was found. When I wanted to go to this place I had to find someone who wanted to bring me there because it was hard to reach according to people around there because of latest hurricanes and earthquakes . After a lot of negotiations I found someone with a little boat to go there and to be honest it was worth the whole trip!! I hope you liked it! Let me know what you think! Marco Bontenbal https://pixanpictures.com
  8. Hey, guys, we are the Urban Collective and we don't want you to think we're here for views or to sell teeshirts like most of the tripe you see on YouTube (No disrespect intended)... We actually have a genuine new found passion for #UrbanExploration and have been constantly uploading Photographic and video reports to @obliviontate recently and will continue to do so. We'd just like take a moment to share our new trailer for the channel for a bit of feedback and just to let you guys know we exist. We're always paying attention to what others do, and give good positive feedback on posts across the forum and the web. We adhere to the rules Urban Exploring and would just like to continue to share our experiences photos videos etc with like minded people within an awesome community. We are just that face in the crowd watching as the high streets dwindle and the corporations take over. We are The Urban Collective We Film It... By the way guys, i hope I posted this in the right place? Sorry if I didn't I didn't want to post it in the videos bit because it is not a report cheers guy's.
  9. Ive wanted to shoot this place for a long time so hooked up with Rusty and made a full day out of it, this being the first of four sites .......ManorG T was settled in the Anglo-Saxon era. Ælfric of Abingdon held the manor of G T by 990 and became Archbishop of Canterbury in 995. Ælfric died in 1005, leaving G T to Saint Alban's Abbey. In 1049-1052 the abbey leased G TLeofstan, abbot, and St Albans Abbey, to Tova, widow of Wihtric, in return for 3 marks of gold and an annual render of honey; lease, for her lifetime and that of her son, Godwine, of land at Cyrictiwa, with reversion to St Albans.In Old English toponym Cyrictiwa means "Church Tew", distinguishing the village from neighbouring Little Tew which lacked its own church, and Nether Worton which seems not to have had its own chapel until the 12th century.[2]William the Conqueror granted the manor to his step-brother Odo, Bishop of Bayeux, and it was recorded amongst Odo's estates in the Domesday Book in 1086.T G Park was created before the latter part of the 16th century.Sir Lawrence Tanfield, Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer, bought G T estate in 1611 from Edward Rainsford. He deprived the villagers of timber, causing some of the cottages to fall into disrepair. Tanfield enclosed part of G Ts lands in 1622. However, most of the parish's common lands were not enclosed until Parliament passed an Enclosure Act for G T in 1767.1. 2.3.After Tanfield died in 1626, followed by his wife Elizabeth in 1629, G T passed to his young son-in-lawLucius Cary, 2nd Viscount Falkland.In the 1630s Lucius gathered a circle of writers and scholars at G T including Abraham Cowley, Ben Jonson and Edmund Waller. During the English Civil War the young Viscount fought on the Royalist side and was killed in 1643 at the First Battle of Newbury. G T remained in the Cary family until the death ofAnthony Cary, 5th Viscount of Falkland in 1694.Viscount Cary lived in a large manor house which seems to have been built in or before the early part of the 17th century and seems to have been extended in the latter part of the 17th century. It was demolished in about 1800 but outlying structures from about 1700 including its stables, dovecote and stone gatepiers survive.4.5.6.7.In 1780 and 1793 G T estate was bought by George Stratton, who had made a fortune in the East India Company. He died in March 1800 and was succeeded by his son George Frederick Stratton. The manor house had evidently fallen into disrepair, as the Strattons lived in a smaller Georgian dower house slightly to the south of it and had the manor house demolished in about 1803. In 1808 George Frederick Stratton engaged the Scots botanist and garden designer John Loudon, who laid out north and south drives in G T Park and planted ornamental trees in and around the village, which today enhance its picturesque appearance.In 1815-1816 Matthew Robinson Boulton, the son of the manufacturer Matthew Boulton of Soho, Birmingham, bought GT Estate. In 1825 Boulton added aGothic Revival library to the east end of the house, and in the middle of the 19th century the Boulton family added a large Tudor style section to the west end.]G T remained with the Boulton family until M.E. Boulton died without heirs in 1914. ...8.9.10.Next stop The Horders House ....11.1213.14.Swimming Pool W.15.16.17.18.19.Asylum G.20.21.22.23.24.Cheers for looking [email protected]@l.............
  10. Peppermint Powerplant I've seen this particular location a few times before online but I decided to post up a report on it anyway because I think it's quite special with some unique characteristics. History The Peppermint Powerplant was built in conjunction to a nearby paper mill with the purpose of supplying electricity to the mill. The plant features a stunning peppermint colour scheme on the singular turbine and control panels. The turbine itself was produced by Siemens, a company established in 1904 in Berlin and is currently one of the most prominent manufactures of high powered gas turbines worldwide. The plant n also hosted two Steinmüller boilers. One of which was commissioned in 1954 and the other in 1965. Both the power station and the paper mill were decommissioned around 1999. From what we could see the paper mill had been stripped. But despite being closed for nearly 20 years the power station has remained in very nice condition. Visit Last stop for the day on a Euro trip with @darbians. We both wanted to see this site so we decided it was worth having a quick look before it got too dark. Even though it wasn't a large site there was still a good amount to photograph, in fact I wish I took more but here are the ones I did manage to get. (Excuse the awkward handheld shot) (Getting pretty dark by this point so we called it a day) Hope you enjoyed reading my report.
  11. This is Manicomio Di V (Mental asylum). The hospital was built in 1930 due to growing demand for mental support in the region. The hospital closed in 1991 due to new laws. [ The overgrown church [ The entrance of the theatre The decaying theatre The old projector Fences to prevent patients escaping or committing suicide The overgrown roads through the facility The entrance of the shower building The shower rooms Decaying bathroom Picture of one of the patients This was the section were alcohol addicted people would be taken care of Old poster of a Lancia Prisma Backstage the theatre The stockroom One room were the patients would sleep a couple of phones thrown in a corner Thanks for looking!
  12. The Old Sodality Club #Leigh Lanc's This video is the first of my new series #bygonepubs where Il be documenting the steady decline of these wonderful gathering holes as the corporations' franchises and chains etc increase their stamp on society. I've had wonderful feedback from many people since posting this video on "cough cough" Facebook, who've told me many wonderful stories about the place before it was lost to economic decline thank's to the powers that be. I believe the place closed in 2010 ish and was once a popular watering hole for many a denizen. From parties to football to darts and karaoke the place once bustled with the familiar tone's of friendship and alcoholism "Swigs his Guinness". You can almost hear the faint echoes of the past in places like these so I'd like to share my documentation of the place in a video format as I did not get many pics. Thanks for any feedback guys. PEACE The Urban Collective We Film It...
  13. Hey, guys here's a link to my Urban Exploration photographic and video portfolio! I will be uploading regularly across the web and would like to become an active member of this community. Thanks for any feedback guys! Take care. https://clarky15031.wixsite.com/theurbancollective
  14. "Wallpaper paper peeling heaven" History Eastmoor Secure Unit for Children, located near the small village of Adel in Leeds West Yorkshire opened in 1857 as the Leeds Reformatory for Boys by the Leeds Society for the Reformation of Juvenile Offenders, on a site deliberately chosen to be removed from the temptations of the city. Reformatories were distinguished from Industrial Schools by taking young people who had actually committed offences such as begging, wandering, consorting with thieves and prostitution, opposed to those who were merely destitute or neglected and in danger of falling into crime. There were around 50 boys at the school in 1858. The south-east range and headmaster’s house was added in 1860, when the attic floor of the initial range was converted to dormitories. The workshops of the north-east range, built by the boys in 1859, were rebuilt in 1881 after a fire, and a separate chapel to the south was added in 1882, The swimming pool beyond the north-west range was added in 1887 and roofed in 1896. A boiler room between the north-west range and the pool was inserted in 1899 to heat the pool. It was used by community groups as well as inmates, and swimming and life-saving were taught. (This swimming pool is now one of the oldest in the country.) The buildings continued in use as an approved school named Eastmoor School from 1933 and then a community home when it was taken over by Leeds CC on 1st April 1973. It was then known as Eastmoor CHE, that is Community Home with Education. A number of separate houses were constructed around the core site from the 1950s onwards, but there has been little change to the buildings externally. In 1993 a secure unit for young offenders was built on part of the site, the Eastmoor approved school which housed some of the countries most dangerous child criminals including one of the Bulger Killers, Jon Venables. The site was leased to Leeds Metropolitan University from the late 1990s when the surrounding houses were used for student accommodation who left when a new campus opened in Headingley in 2003. It has been unused since c2004 and has been marketed for housing development. Explore Little hard to find this one and is some distance from the centre. Having trailed through woodland, through peoples back gardens (sorry) and then finally walking a further distance we came across this desolate hospital. The x-hospital sits next to a brand new secure unit for children, which gives the place a surreal feel. The building is in an extremely poor condition most of the upper floorS have gaping holes through to the lower floors and there is a high presence of asbestos. In the courtyard someone as gone to the trouble to spell out 'HELL IS PCP' using huge stones that have been piled in the courtyard, guessing building works commenced at some point. Theres a lot of atmosphere in the building and a few times we were sure there were others camping around the building. Worth an explore just watch the floors and the local addicts... oh and there a bar in the building (unfortunately not selling beverages) most probably installed for the students. Pics 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. LE FIN
  15. Kastix Ltd History Built in 1947 as the new drill hall for the 2nd Volunteer Battalion West Riding Regiment. Later used as the offices for Kastix, a textile company producing womenswear and children's clothing, which went in to receivership in 2001 with the loss of more than 50 jobs. Conversion plans There are currently plans to demolish the site to construct an Aldi supermarket. The exterior Bit out of the way... but was in the area so decided to take a look. Its a fair size and considering it's had no owners since 2001 the condition of the place is pretty decent. Stopping at the top of the road and checking for hostiles we decided to take a closer look. Theres lots of works adjacent and we attracted quite a few spectators as we scrambled through the fencing... moving in we could see there were a few CCTV cameras, rusty and outdated these were perhaps part of the security measures when the building was last working. Starting at the front and working our way to the back (drawn quite a crowd at this point) we were intrigued to find an entry point. The exterior is fitting with the period and will be a shame when the building is demolished to make way for the plastic prefabs that are ALDI. Most of the windows and doors are original but it looks like efforts were made to modernise the building at some point. Scaling the roof... checking for open doors windows (bingo).. we were in. The interior Making our way through a small room and then into a much larger hall we were a little taken back by the size of the building... Strewn garments, hangers and palettes of junk made us a little unsettled and it was almost like a worker was about to appear and escort us off the premises (or maybe try sell us some clothing). Making our way past the left overs we headed to the doors littered across the back of the building. slowly working through the rooms we came to the main stairwell... making our way to the upper floors...we made our way through the many offices, empty and miscellaneous rooms ending in an area with some pretty creepy looking changing rooms. Overall theres a few cool bits and in our opinion its worth documenting if not for the very creepy mannequins, the overall condition or the asthetics the sheer amount of stuff left over from previous occupiers. There also an attic area which was a little difficult to reach but it did look like someone had gone to the effort to investigate. That concludes the explore...
  16. Hi m8s! This is the last adventure I lived with my brother, exploring and old hotel and some random abandoned houses. Cheers!
  17. History Officially opened by the Earl of Scarborough in 1957, it was built the year before for £350,000 as headquarters for Leeds chemicals and dyestuffs firm Brotherton and Co and was at the heart of a new business area at the Westgate end of The Headrow. It was named in recognition of the famous Leeds city benefactor family, after the Brotherton Library and Collection at Leeds University, the Charles Brotherton engineering and chemical laboratory, the Brotherton Wing at the Leeds General Infirmary and the Brotherton Charity Trust. It was dubbed as the design of the future with the “latest external and internal structural techniques, automatic ventilation and ceiling heating”. Its ceilings were reported to be “acoustically perfect”, and its floors covered in highly-polished parquet. It was in 1965 – long before the merging of local police forces and the establishment of the current West Yorkshire force, that the old Leeds City Police took over part of the building and ultimately established its administrative headquarters there. In addition to the then Chief Constable and his Assistant Chief, numerous other police departments have been based at Brotherton House over the decades including senior CID, Special Branch, Fraud Squad, Regional Crime Squad, Firearms Registry, Aliens Department, Force Prosecutions, Special Constabulary, Training, Photographic and Fingerprint departments, the then so-called Policewomen’s Department, Pay and Accounts. Most notable investigations to have been carried out at Brotherton house was the notorious "Ripper squad" which was applied to a group of investigators and was the term used by the media for the investigation into the Yorkshire Ripper murders. Including George Oldfield the man in charge of the investigation. Today, the building – which has largely been vacated – overlooks the Leeds Inner Ring Road and is described by its agents as a “substantial high-profile office building with a significant presence.” Explore A day out in Leeds, driving on the ring road I noticed a building covered in green fabric... on closer inspection we found out by locals telling us that the building was abandon. Mostly the building is in good condition with a large amount of original features untouched.. the main hall is really something with original parquet flooring and a grand stair case leading into the main building. Corridors lead to open staircases on both sides of the building which offer access to the buildings six floors including rooftop. Pics 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. and 12 13. 14. 15. 16. and 17. LE FIN
  18. History Bishopgarth was first built in 1891 for the Bishop to live in. In 1946 the site became the West Yorkshire Metropolitan Police Training School. The classrooms were built in 1952 and the new block added in 1969 (the accommodation). There were 14 course's for training police men/women these course's included fingerprints, computer training, firearms, public speaking and traffic management. Bishopgarth could take a maximum of 250 students at any one time and usually there were 200 students staying at the on-site accommodation. To be a policeman you must be 5'9\" tall and for a policewoman 5'6" tall. This is the same as 166cm tall for policemen and 154cm tall for policewomen. The police moved to a new facility in Carr Gate in 2014. The Carr Gate complex houses Firearms, Driver, Public Order, Crime, IT, Foundation and Leadership and Development training. But the question is what will happen to the the now old and abandoned Bishopgarth police training well the first option proposed by the planners would see the entire site used for new homes, believed to be between 120 and 150. The second option would see the number of suggested homes reduced to include space for a residential care home. There is some more info on the matter here https://www.wakefieldexpress.co.uk/news/plans-for-150-homes-and-care-home-at-bishopgarth-1-6890284 1. Explore Upon arriving we noticed a massive metal fence around the perimeter, but we also noticed a lot of gaps in the fence as soon as we got walking down the drive way we got rustled by the security. We Looped around to the back where the alleged bishops palace is and snuck in through there... From getting into the bishopgarth area we headed straight to the accommodation building... we did this because we only really came for that building. When we got there we heard rustling, peeking around the corner and seeing a hi-viz vest it was security so quickly we had to run across the courtyard... thankful we missed the security, walking up the stairs to the main entrance of the accommodation building it was boarded so we looked around the whole permitter and found some boards ripped off at the side... looking around the building was like walking around a maze thankfully not a pitch black one thanks to our exploring light. Once we got past the first few floors what contained the dinning room and the main entrance it was just copy paste bedrooms and corridors. After we explored a floor of the bedrooms we got our assess up to the top floor AKA the roof access, we spent a while looking at the landmarks of wakefield and taking pics of the roof but it was hard because at this point we did not want to get spotted... running down the stairs to get out, had a lot more to explore!!! After the buzz of the accommodation building, we thought it would be hard to beat... ow god was we mistaken. After sneaking across the path we ran into the office/ classrooms... not much going on the outside of the building but once we entered (by opening the door) it was of its rocker! Walking in we had access to the bottom floor, very dark there were a couple classrooms and some office type looking buildings but the real deal was the top floor. We found the stairs after about 15mins of looking around... up the stairs were the IT classrooms and some offices with everything still inside. After we took pics of the upstairs, we wanted to get out but knowing there was the main entrance (with the automatic doors) we had a deeper look... finally we found it, did not expect wooden cladding, a safe, some nice stairs and some trash we was more than happy. But there was still some stairs to climb up... a whole new world (another corridor with some classrooms) the only bit worth looking at up there is the graffiti where the homeless slept. To end of on a positive note we thought we would have a look around the many 'houses' on the site... only getting in one which was a little outhouse at the back of the accommodation building... i say a little outhouse but if we bumped into that when we stared off we would have lost our minds. After that we got some more externals but we just wanted to get off really... PICS 2. 3. 4. Narrowly avoiding security 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. The admin office. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. SAFE 27. 28. 29. 30. LE FIN
  19. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Little house somewhere in Belgium. Seems there lived an 103 year old lady and after a fire on the upper floor she left the house. Her son still comes there every week to feed the cat.
  20. A seminary in France that was later used as a medical centre and with a beautiful chapel! I think it closed within the past decade. Thanks for looking!
  21. Hello everyone! Some months ago I went on a trip to Serbia, and thanks to a member of this forum who gave me advice on some locations I was able to do some good urbex in the meantime! Here is my report! (I tried my best searching for info on this place on Serbian websites with the help of Google translate, I hope this is accurate! ) This place is an abandoned luxury hotel in the Sumadija district, Serbia. The palace is very old: it was built between 1868 and 1872 by the prince Mihail Obrenovic, basing on architect Koste Shreplovic’s design. Originally built to be the Serbian National Assembly palace, it became the residence for the Obrenovic dynasty when the Serbian capital was moved from Kragujevac to Beograd. In 1903 a coup took place in Beograd: members of the Obrenovic family were either exiled or killed. But in the following years a railroad was built from the city to Beograd, so the palace became an hotel where all of those who travelled daily from the capital would stay. In 1964 the hotel was sold to a Serbian company, which bankrupted in the early 2000s. In October of 2005 it became property of the government, which tried to sell it but without success. Nowadays it still lays abandoned. The most amazing thing of this palace is the dancing hall: it's just too beautiful! One thing I have to point out is that, even if it has been abandoned since 2005, the building has very little traces of vandalism and it still is in a very good shape. This is exactly the opposite of what happens in Italy. Hope you liked my report guys! I'll see you in the next exploration!
  22. hallo, this video is about abandoned swimming pool in Slovakia. It is my first (but not last - soon there will be more) so I hope you like it. Thank you.
  23. This extravagant castle was originally built in 1605 to a more simple design. During the 19th century it underwent an Arabian style makeover which took 40 years to reach completion. No attention was spared to detail, with each and every one of the 365 rooms given its own identity. During the second world war it was looted by the Germans. After that it became a luxury hotel until it closed it's doors in 1990. Since then various plans have fallen through and a very recent sale attempt was upheld by Italian courts so its future remains unknown. I visited here with @Miss.Anthrope, a place we'd both had firmly at the top of our wish lists for some time. We could've spent hours in here but decided to air on the side of caution and keep our visit relatively short as we'd been asked to leave the area by security the day before. I guess it was pretty obvious what we were up to with camera bags and tripods peeking over the fence and we'd been spotted on cctv. On our return we made sure not to make the same mistake as they are definitely keeping an eye on the place. Derelict buildings don't come much more stunning than this. Ciao bella
  24. Hello everyone! I'm Enrico, an amateur photographer and filmmaker which also like urbex. Since I started with my hobbies I created a portfolio on my website where I would upload my best photos, being them urbex or not. I also have a youtube channel where I upload videos of my explorations. They are in Italian but english subbed so I hope you'll still enjoy them! I'll leave the links below, tell me if you like the photos/videos! http://www.youtube.com/enricovaloti - Youtube channel http://www.enricovaloti.it - My website. Fully in English, just scroll down and check "Urbex" to select only urbex posts.
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