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  1. known to explorers by its nick name! Adwy Deg; the fair retreat Life was hard for Welsh hill farmers; the nearest road to this property is a mile away; The date of the turnpike road newly-constructed between 1777 and 1823 supports the suggestion that the settlement of this central area is principally late 18th century/early 19th century in date. Most of the farmsteads appear to date from this period, almost all of which lie to the west of (and below) the main road, boarded up with sadly time and thieves taking their toll not much left to see; but it was a great experience to spend an hour living in another's footprint on this earth; t seems the last occupant was a Miss Elizabeth Williams First entered into OS it seems between 1898-1908 The Certificate translated basically is for an exam achievement at Methodist ( Calvanist) Sunday School issued to Cadwaladr Williams class 2; 21st March 1902 For those not old enough to remember proper money; the 1960 receipt from the co-op approx equates to 30 players ciggies: 30p matches: 1p biro: 5p 1 oz golden virginia: 23p 3 gallons of petrol: 70p Happy Days !!!!!!!
  2. A former childrens home part of the Operational Pallial sexual abuse investigation and latterly a residential home for the elderly; the access points to the main building have recently been glued and screwed; still a good mooch round the other buildings
  3. Hi Has anyone ever been around here? I'm off to the area pretty soon & found this place on Google maps... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RNAS_Dale_(HMS_Goldcrest) Google Earth shows what appear to be quite a few intact(ish) barrack blocks & outbuildings, & the place was only used 1941-48, so I'm hoping there'll be something original. Privately owned by a farmer since it was de-commissioned, looks like it was just farmed around the edges.
  4. Been wanting to go here for a while... My Video...https://youtu.be/BehD-Z6XgkM History - From http://www.snowdoniaheritage.info/pdf/pilgrims/pilgrims-nefyn/traeth-trefor-english.pdf It was granite quarries that produced the setts to pave city streets. There was great activity in the areas around Penmaenmawr and the Eifl, and people would move from one to the otherthere from other. Samuel Holland was a prominent person in this industry – the father was a pioneer in Ffestiniog and his son in the granite quarries of the Eifl area. The work began here about 1830, and when Trevor Jones became the quarry supervisor the village at the foot of the Eifl - where Trefor got it's name. By 1850 the area’s granite quarries were owned by ‘The Welsh Granite Co. Ltd’. It was bought for £3,000 and the shares were worth £13,000. In 1911 the Penmaenmawr and Llanfairfechan quarries were joined with the Eifl ones to form the ‘Penmaenmawr and Welsh Granite Co. Ltd’. Trefor quarry developed to be the world’s biggest granite quarry, and by 1931 had produced 1,157,000 tons of setts. The quarry is still occasionally active and Trefor granite is used to make curling stones.
  5. The first attempt to visit it was exactly three years ago. However, I didn't feel very well at this time, so I went back to the car after half the way. Not a bad decision, because The_Raw and the others failed then. Now the second attempt, this time with more luck. A really great and impressive building! Visited with @The_Raw & @Miss.Anthrope. History (taken from The_Raw) The present chateau style house, the third on the site, was built for the Hughes copper mining family. The house, designed in the 1870s, was called a 'calendar house' as it had 365 rooms. It is set in walled gardens of around 18 acres, which are themselves set in grounds of around 5,000 acres, encompassing open fields, parkland and forests. The 1870s structure is an example of the myriad of new types of buildings that were arising during the Victorian era to fulfil increasingly specialised functions. For example, there was a room in the mansion that was only to be used for the ironing of newspapers, so that the ink would not come off on the reader's hands. The property was last used as a private home in 1929, after which it was converted to a 'rheuma spa', a health centre for the treatment of people with rheumatism. The spa remained until the outbreak of World War II, when the hall was taken over as a hospital. Post-war the hall became Clarendon Girls' School, but after extensive fire damage in 1975, the school was forced to close. Restored by businessman Eddie Vince as a Christian conference centre, it was sold at auction in 2001, but a proposed redevelopment by Derbyshire Investments failed to materialise. The property was to be offered for sale by auction on 12 October 2011 with a reserve price of £1.5million which did not include the 5,000 acres of surrounding land. However it was bought shortly before auction by a businessman who bid closest to the £1.5m guide price. He intended to develop the property into a hotel, but these plans never materialised, and the property lies derelict. In 2015 Kinmel Hall was identified by the Victorian Society as one of the top ten at-risk Victorian and Edwardian buildings. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33
  6. In the forest sits this stone building, I can't find any info on it other that it's sitting on a settlement mound. Video.. https://youtu.be/nGuRNOeRuA8
  7. Been waiting all week to go here only to find it's all been boarded back . so just some from the outside.☹️
  8. not done a report in a while and have a nice backlog to catch up with . bit of an old explore this one ,its been arround for years but i wanted to see it anyway so off we went the milk factory has been closed since the 1970s , the milk was collected from the local farms and put in churns trains used to take the milk off to liverpool and other citys . there was a railway platform on the site but too overgrown to get any shots of it , altho the water tank was still there form the time when steam powerd the trains proposed for closure in the Beeching Report it managed to stay in use just for the factory nice natural decay and not vandalised it made for a good hour or so thanks for looking
  9. Managed to find the entrance at the rear; looks like some of the local scrotes have been here some graffitti not too vandalised considering the calendar was still showing 2013
  10. Decided to go to the A R House as it's not far from me, finding the place, getting to the place was easy, getting in was easy. Once in, my battery on my DSLR decided to run out of juice, so I resorted to using the wifes point and shoot camera so sorry for the bad pictures. The worst thing it was raining so I couldn't fly my drone over it. WARNING....Just be aware of a farmer on a quad bike, just started upstairs taking pictures, I heard a quad bike approach the house and stop outside, next thing there was banging on the door, so me and the wife just froze on the stairway I could hear him trying all the windows and doors to get in, he was at it for a good 10mins. I thought any minute now he will be inside, he came around to window we entered through I thought, Yep, here he comes, but all he did was shut the window and then we heard him drive off, at that point my wife was ready to make a bolt for it, I said we'll hang on a few minutes in case there was two of them and ones just driven off to make out they had gone, so a few minutes later we made our exit undetected, we did see him down bottom of the track loading his quad onto a trailer but he didn't say a word to us. The farmer is obviously aware of what's going on. so be aware if you decide to visit.
  11. This is where Henry lived with his wife Mary and their only child, a daughter. Mary died a long time ago and Henry had to move in with his daughter who looks after him. He is 98 years old. After much persuasion he finally agreed that this, the family home must be sold. Henry was a hard-working man with strong moral principles. He's been a prominent member of his local chapel all his life. Among his paperwork includes a certificate dated January 1940 confirming him on the register of Conscientious Objectors. Interestingly he must have had to attend a formal interview to justify his beliefs so had written prepared answers based on questions he thought the authorities might ask, along with character references. Also there was a letter dated September 1976 congratulating him on 25 years service to the BBC as a gardener. This is not just an abandoned house - its a home. In this home are meaningful and treasured possessions but also a home full of memories. This was a sanctuary from the outside world, a place to lead a simple life. [Note - I wrote the above in 2017]
  12. Here's a little selection of some of the more random, less-obvious shots from 10 years of exploring asylums. One shot each from most of the ones I've visited. Thought I'd try and avoid the obvious shots a little. Aston Hall (Nottinghamshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Ward block Bangour Village (West Lothian District Asylum, opened in 1906) Main administration block Barrow (2nd Bristol Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1938) Main corridor Bethel (Charitable public asylum, opened in 1713) Day room Bethlem Royal (4th incarnation of "Bedlam" (founded in 1247), initially for private middle-class patients, opened in 1930) Admin block staircase Cane Hill (3rd Surrey County Asylum, opened in 1883) Chapel altar Carlton Hayes (Leicestershire & Rutland County Asylum, opened in 1904) Chapel Cefn Coed (Swansea Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1932) South-eastern view of ward block and water tower Colney Hatch (aka Friern, 2nd Middlesex County Asylum, later 2nd London County Asylum, opened in 1851) Admin block tower Denbigh (aka North Wales Asylum, opened in 1848) View from ward block window towards admin block clock tower Fairfield (Three Counties Asylum (for Bedfordshire, Hertfordshire & Huntingdonshire), opened in 1860) South east view of main block Fair Mile (Berkshire County Asylum, opened in 1870) South-east view of main block Fulbourn (Cambridgeshire & Ely County Asylum, opened in 1858) Main elevation (admin block in centre) Gartloch (Glasgow District Asylum, opened in 1896) View from dormitory window Glenside (Bristol Borough Asylum, opened in 1861) Chapel window Goodmayes (West Ham Borough Asylum, opened in 1901) Gallery with cell doors Hanwell (Middlesex County Asylum, later first London County Asylum, opened in 1831) Main corridor in female wing Harperbury (Middlesex Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1934) Dormitory Hartwood (Lanarkshire District Asylum, opened in 1895) Jump-proof fire escape Heckingham (former Norwich Union Workhouse, converted into 2nd Norfolk County Mental Hospital, opened in 1927) Main elevation Hellingly (East Sussex County Asylum, opened in 1903) Corridor network (with random portable bathtub) Hensol (Glamorganshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Interview room High Royds (3rd West Riding County Asylum, opened in 1888) Glazed-tile doorway Horton (8th London County Asylum, opened in 1902) Administration block The Lawn (Charitable Public Asylum, opened in 1820) View from eastern wing Lennox Castle (Dunbartonshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1937) Admin block coaching entrance Leybourne Grange (Kent Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1936) OT room Little Plumstead (Norfolk Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Discarded training material Mapperley (Nottingham Borough Asylum, opened in 1880) Southern aspect Middlewood (2nd West Riding County Asylum, opened in 1872) Chapel Napsbury (Middlesex County Asylum, opened in 1905) Recreation hall (left) and ward block (right), with water tower in background Pen-Y-Fal (Monmouthshire County Asylum, opened in 1851) Ward blocks Pool Parc (Overspill annexe to North Wales Mental Hospital, opened in 1937) Main corridor Rauceby (Kesteven County Asylum, opened in 1902) Administration block Rosslynlee (East Lothian & Peebles District Asylum, opened in 1874) Recreation hall Runwell (East Ham & Southend-on-Sea Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1937) Chapel Severalls (2nd Essex County Asylum, opened in 1913) Gallery with cell doors St Andrew's (Norfolk County Asylum, opened in 1814) Mortuary St Brigid's (Connaught District Asylum, opened in 1833) Ward corridor St Cadoc's (Newport Borough Asylum, opened in 1906) Window in day-room. St Clement's (Ipswich Borough Asylum, opened in 1870) "Quiet room" in medium-secure annexe St Crispin (Northamptonshire County Asylum, opened in 1876) Staircase in Superintendent's residence St David's (Joint Counties Asylum for Carmarthenshire, Pembrokeshire & Cardiganshire, opened 1865) Observation room in annexe St George's (Northumberland County Asylum, opened in 1859) Corridor network St John's (Lincolnshire County Asylum, opened in 1852) Admin block main reception St Mary's (Gateshead Borough Asylum, opened in 1914) Corridor network Stone House (The City Of London Asylum, opened in 1866) Dining hall Strathmartin (aka Balvodan) (Charitable Public Idiot Asylum, opened in 1855) Eastern side of main building Sunnyside Royal (Montrose District Asylum, opened in 1858) Congregation area outside recreation hall Talgarth (Joint Breconshire and Radnorshire County Asylum, aka Mid-Wales Asylum, opened in 1903) View from ward window The Towers (Leicester Borough Asylum, opened in 1869) Main corridor in ward section of eastern block West Park (11th London County Asylum, opened in 1915 as Canadian War Hospital, reopened in 1923 as mental hospital) Geriatric ward day room Whittingham (4th Lancashire County Asylum, opened in 1873) Entrance into ward block from corridor network
  13. History Maes Mynan care home was a two floor 33 bedroom care home on a site of 2.6 acres. The care home was for the elderly and it had its own day service and its own respite service for a short stay and emergency placements. The site was bought in 2013 by the healthcare company and has been left untouched since. The building itself we could not find much history about or anything about when the care home opened. Our Visit We decided to visit this place when we went out on a day trip to Engedi chapel (report will be up soon). On the way back we still had a lot of daylight left so we thought we would stop in and have a look at this site after seeing a report. The surrounding area was very overgrown and there was a long pathway leading up to the build. The site itself was in pretty good condition, well worth the visit if you have any free time. Be mindful if you do visit as just at the back of the site, there is a house that we assumed is occupied.
  14. I have no information about this house, located somewhere in Wales, in the middle of nowhere... Visited with @The_Raw and @Miss.Anthrope. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
  15. wanted to see this one for a few years , nice ammount of natural decay has taken over the main hut has now collapsed , older pics from here show it still dtanding but i think last winters snow done it in i know there are still more huts further down the site but the brambles prevented getting to them one of the floors was so rotten when i put my foot on it it went straight through and ate half my shoe, had to do a days exploring with only one and a half shoes . dib dib , urbex explore badge earned thanks for looking
  16. Hey everyone, so I'm pretty sure everyone's heard of this place so i dont really need to explain much about it, but if you haven't, below is a brief history of Denbigh Mental Asylum. Grade 2 Listed building. Built work started in 1844 Building work completed in 1848 Built to house up to 200 patients with psychiatric illnesses. In the early 1900's it housed 1537 patients (Approx). The hospital had its own farm and gas works. Planned for closure by Enoch Powellin the 1960's, however it only began closing in sections between 1991-1995. Nurses Quarters: This is genuinely one of the best condition buildings that i have ever explored. Most of the lower floor windows were covered in either ivy or thick vines, so it got quite dark in some sections of the building. Now for the hospital itself, my personal favorite photos: Thanks for reading, Make sure to check out my youtube channel Jake Alan Craig for the video and my instagram @exploring_with_jake for regular abandoned photos. #WereJustTrespassing
  17. The present chateau style house, the third on the site, was built for the Hughes copper mining family. The house, designed in the 1870s, was called a 'calendar house' as it had 365 rooms. It is set in walled gardens of around 18 acres, which are themselves set in grounds of around 5,000 acres, encompassing open fields, parkland and forests. The 1870s structure is an example of the myriad of new types of buildings that were arising during the Victorian era to fulfil increasingly specialised functions. For example, there was a room in the mansion that was only to be used for the ironing of newspapers, so that the ink would not come off on the reader's hands. The property was last used as a private home in 1929, after which it was converted to a 'rheuma spa', a health centre for the treatment of people with rheumatism. The spa remained until the outbreak of World War II, when the hall was taken over as a hospital. Post-war the hall became Clarendon Girls' School, but after extensive fire damage in 1975, the school was forced to close. Restored by businessman Eddie Vince as a Christian conference centre, it was sold at auction in 2001, but a proposed redevelopment by Derbyshire Investments failed to materialise. The property was to be offered for sale by auction on 12 October 2011 with a reserve price of £1.5million which did not include the 5,000 acres of surrounding land. However it was bought shortly before auction by a businessman who bid closest to the £1.5m guide price. He intended to develop the property into a hotel, but these plans never materialised, and the property lies derelict. In 2015 Kinmel Hall was identified by the Victorian Society as one of the top ten at-risk Victorian and Edwardian buildings. This has popped up a few times over the last few years and amazingly nothing much has changed since the last report in 2016. I failed here a couple of years back so it was time for round 2 with @Andy& @Miss.Anthrope. We don't take Ls baby! Renovation work appears to be taking place so there are definitely people working here during the week. The ground floor is where all the good stuff is at. Upstairs everything is pretty much stripped and empty. Anyway, I'm glad to have finally made it in here. Definitely one of the best mansions in the UK. Cheers for looking
  18. Not a lot about this place, I believe the bowling part shut down in 2009 and then the crystal maze part shut down in 2010. Oakwood own this place and have no plans for it besides letting it rot away. Whoever is trying to look after this place is attempting to keep people out. Heard about this place from a different site, easy to find, such a pain in the arse to get into as there's a very tight gap to try and squeeze through.. Thee maze is bigger than first thought, only uploaded a few pictures of that.
  19. Visited with The Kwan on a rainy Saturday, some lovely bits left in the area and we missed quite a bit so theres always an excuse for a return visit. Some History The name Ratgoed derives from “Yr Allt Goed”, which means the steep, wooded hillside. Ratgoed mine was also sometimes known as “Alltgoed”. The Ratgoed slate workings lie at the head of what was originally called Cwm Ceiswyr but became known as Cwm Ratgoed because of the quarry. It lies north of Aberllefenni and northwest of Corris in, what is now, the Dyfi Forest. The slate that was quarried at Ratgoed was the Narrow Vein. This runs from south of Tywyn, on the coast, to Dinas Mawddwy about 18 miles inland and follows the line of the Bala Fault. The Narrow Vein was worked along its length at places such as Bryneglwys near Abergynolwyn; Gaewern & Braich Goch at Corris, Foel Grochan at Aberllefenni and Minllyn at Dinas Mawddwy. The slate at Ratgoed dips at 70° to the southeast, the same as Foel Grochan. Ratgoed was a relatively small working, it was worked from around 1840 until its closure in 1946. Pics [ [ Le Kwan Thanks for looking
  20. Thought I'd post my old stuff up seeing as Nelly promised to post me a greggs pasty in return.
  21. A bit of a revisit to see if anything had changed since my last visit in 2014 Well worth a look if your passing. Some History The Culvert in Ebbw Vale is along the River Ebbw Fawr, a stretch of just over a mile of the river was Culverted in 1937 to accommodate expansion of the steel works. The tunnel was originally a brick lined concrete arch for its entire length. In places it has raised walkways on either side, it is well documented that someone died in this Culvert from touching a live wire that some metal thieves had cut some years ago. Pics Thanks for looking
  22. Calcott Hall The Explore Well, I'm a little behind on posting reports, 13 months behind to be exact. Mojo issues mixed with a busy year but generally can't be arsed with the whole thing. Normally this is where I'd write about the explore and what happened etc but I really can't remember much as it was last April and I've slept approximately 387 times since then. I had a quick squiz at @Urbexbandoned's report to jog my memory, to pinch the history, and to view all the items that I myself failed to photograph due to walking around with my eyes closed as normal. Easy derp to have a wander around and I think we had spent the previous few days sleeping in the car near, and inside of, a large hospital down south in Cardiff, then worked our way up to Shropshire and back to Lincoln on a lengthy road trip of derpy delights.. History This was once a Dairy Farm, built in 1725 as a Georgian Farmhouse. It's most recent resident was Ellen Jones who died in the 70's. I believe that some of her family also lived there as there are lots of bits of paperwork for a Francis Jones & a gentleman with the same surname. This farmhouse has more or less a written / photographic story of the residents who once lived there. Cupboards littered with bread and cake making supplies and ingredients showed the life of a typical farmhouse wife. Exterior buildings litter the farmhouse, some still being used today with the farmland scattered with cattle. Set in a beautiful little countryside, I cant help but think this really would have been beautiful in it's day. The Pictures 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7/8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. Little bonus car in the garage in the grounds.. 16. As always thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated
  23. I've driven past this place many times but only recently realised it was empty as I passed it on a day out to explore, I know nothing of its history but deduce it's been empty around 5 years according to magazines found inside. It's situated in Mid Wales on a main road and the gardens are quite overgrown, thankfully this time of year the greenery is manageable! All doors were closed but thankfully one of them wasn't locked. There is also an outbuilding next door which I didn't have time to check out properly to see if there was access, next time maybe. Thanks for looking.
  24. A nice find by @SpiderMonkey while perusing the many chapels of Wales, this proved to be a surprisingly pleasing bonus for our Weekend... Capel Salem is an abandoned chapel in Pwllheli, North Wales. Built in 1862, the building was remodelled and enlarged in 1893 and is now Grade II listed. Along with the chapel, there are a couple of vestry rooms and a school room. The chapel was closed for around two years from 1913 and required extensive renovation following a fire. The fire was started by a local man who had tried to steal money from the chapel. He was unable to find any money so started the blaze instead.
  25. The first of a couple of chapels in Wales I visited with @SpiderMonkey last month... Engedi Chapel was established in 1842 and built as we see it today in 1867. The chapel's most impressive feature is its grand classical entrance, designed by architect Richard Owen of Liverpool. Its organ, pulpit and pews also remain intact.
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