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  1. The small and simple house is a building that might be overlooked pretty easily. Yet, upon entering the small world of the former owner reveals itself. Anna's small realm appeared simple but pretty cosy as well. Faith was visible part of her life. She was a nun who was also engaged in missionary work abroad. According to speculations the sister never came back home from a foreign mission in a crisis region. To what extent the rumours of her disappearance are true is probably always going to stay an unsolved mystery. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
  2. History Owned and operated by Philadelphia Electric Company (now Exelon), the Port Richmond power generation station was built from 1919 to 1925. Designed by architect John T. Windrim and engineer W.C.L. Eglin, the coal-fired electrical generation plant was placed into service in 1925 and the station’s Neoclassical Revival design was used by the company to reflect permanence, stability, and responsibility. As designed, the station was to contain three distinct generating components; each component was to consist of a boiler house to produce steam, a turbine hall, and a switch gear building to control power distribution. At its peak, the Port Richmond station’s four huge steam turbines had a capacity of 600 megawatts. Explore This was the first mooch of a 3 week trip to the States. Philadelphia was a very interesting experience. Within 36 hours of arriving in Philly, I witnessed a racial gun incident, got pulled by the local law enforcement and saw a cop attacked with a firework. A week before I arrived the Eagles won their first Superbowl and the locals trashed the city in celebration. Interesting city, Philadelphia. Mooched around here with a guy from Montana and we enjoyed a few beers while walking around. Nice quiet explore, only interrupted when a scrappy followed us around briefly. I had been looking forward to this for months, and it was made better by the mist that had rolled in from the Delaware River. (1) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) (15) ( (16) (17) (18) (19) (20) (21) (22) (23) (24) (25) Cheers for Looking
  3. On first sight, there´s only a plain building hidden between bushes and coniferes. It´s located on the grounds of a former Soviet military base in Germany. It seems to be like other barracks, nothing special. Yet, while approaching the barrack, attached high walls with barbed wire appear forming a small yard. Rustling branches of the trees which are now growing all over the yard and an icy wind add to the somewhat eerie atmosphere. On entering the building, the darkness is starting to hit you in an instant. Only sparse light shines in. Additionally, the walls were painted with dark and unfriendly colours. Surely, not without reason - simple, yet efficient psychologial means. Here, at the latest, the purpose of the building becomes crystal-clear: it was used as a jail by the Soviet occupiers. What kind of offenses were punished with a stay inside one of these dark cells with bald walls - only equipped with some wooden plank beds - is unknown. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
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