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  1. This church was the reason why I wanted to go to Wales during my last trip to the UK. Thanks @The_Raw and @Miss.Anthrope for visiting this place with me. History (taken from The_Raw) Engedi Welsh Calvinistic Methodist Chapel built was built in 1842, rebuilt in 1867 and modified in 1890. The present chapel, dated 1867, is built in the Classical style of the gable entry type, to the design of architect Richard Owen of Liverpool by Evan Jones of Dolyd and cost £4579. The Classical front is of granite masonry with Penmon stone dressings and a portico. The chapel is now Grade II listed. The interior contains an octagonal pulpit and an ornate organ with classical detailing including Corinthian pilasters and swags. The raked galley is on three sides and is supported by cast iron columns with brackets and foliate capitals. The ceiling consists of 15 square panels, again very heavily decorated with classical mouldings and with ornate roses to the centre of each providing ventilation and fittings for lights. The basement has a ministers room, offices and a schoolroom. The chapel was sold at auction in April 2014 for £45,000 after having been disused for a number of years. At this time it remains disused and in a state of disrepair. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
  2. History Maes Mynan care home was a two floor 33 bedroom care home on a site of 2.6 acres. The care home was for the elderly and it had its own day service and its own respite service for a short stay and emergency placements. The site was bought in 2013 by the healthcare company and has been left untouched since. The building itself we could not find much history about or anything about when the care home opened. Our Visit We decided to visit this place when we went out on a day trip to Engedi chapel (report will be up soon). On the way back we still had a lot of daylight left so we thought we would stop in and have a look at this site after seeing a report. The surrounding area was very overgrown and there was a long pathway leading up to the build. The site itself was in pretty good condition, well worth the visit if you have any free time. Be mindful if you do visit as just at the back of the site, there is a house that we assumed is occupied.
  3. probably a well known site. It was more then 4 years ago that i visited this one so a revisit was planned. On a sunny Sunday I went alone to this site;following the same path as 4 yeas ago,but wanted to see some other parts of this giant plant. Walked there for more than 4 hours and still not seen everything. Unfortunately the metal thieves were also active that day,removing metal ,so sometimes little parts and bolts fell down near the blast furnace. They even used a grinder. Security had a day of I think. (heard that 2 weeks before,some explores were caught here by security). It makes U think. Again a nice view from the top,and nice place to take a break.When I was up there ,I heard a lot of sirens and fire trucks coming towards the site,but (un)fortunately) there was a small fire in a home near the site. 1. IMG_2238-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 2 IMG_2252-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 3 IMG_2357-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 4 IMG_2312-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 5 IMG_2282-Edit-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 6 IMG_2362-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 7 IMG_2395-Pano-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 8 IMG_2381-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 9 IMG_2421-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 10 IMG_2429 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 11 IMG_2432 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 12 IMG_2447-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 13 IMG_2442 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 14 IMG_2375 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 15 IMG_2305-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
  4. We had no idea how we would get on here. After driving through the night and arriving in the early hours, our entry was just awful! As we sat in the freezing cold, and the light started to appear at the windows, we could see it was worth the effort. Visited with @SpiderMonkey, obvs! History The Royal High School was constructed between 1826 to 1829 on the south face of Calton Hill in Edinburgh, at a cost of £34,000. Of this £500 was given by King George IV ‘as a token of royal favour towards a School, which, as a royal foundation, had conferred for ages incalculable benefits on the community’. It was designed in a neoclassical Greek Doric style by Thomas Hamilton, who modelled the portico and Great Hall on the Hephaisteion of Athens. After the Old Royal High School was vacated in 1968, the building became available and was refurbished to accommodate a new devolved legislature for Scotland. However, the 1979 devolution referendum failed to provide sufficient backing for a devolved assembly. Its debating chamber was later used for meetings of the Scottish Grand Committee, the committee of Members of Parliament in the United Kingdom House of Commons with constituencies in Scotland. Subsequently, the building has been used as offices for departments of Edinburgh City Council, including The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award unit and the Sports and Outdoor Education unit. With the passage of the Scotland Act 1998 and the introduction of Scottish devolution in 1999, the Old Royal High School was again mooted as a potential home for the new Scottish Parliament. Eventually, however, the Scotland Office decided to site the new legislature in a purpose-built structure in the Holyrood area of the Canongate. A number of uses have been suggested for the building, including a home for a Scottish National Photography Centre. As of 2015, Edinburgh City Council – the building’s current owners – have initiated a project to lease the building to be used as a luxury hotel. Finally a few shots of the grand neoclassical exterior...
  5. We didn't really know what to expect with this one, only found on Google Earth, few recent informations... But life can also be surprising, and this time, it was good ! 😄 Built during the 13th century and redesign during the 14th and the 18th, it was finally bought by a famous author in the mid 50's. Well known to be a writing haven for the writer, the castle is also known to have hosted some memorable parties with memorable people : Authors, journalists even politics... The Castle was sold a few years the death of his owner to a businessman who wanted to create a place dedicated solely to Art But nothing happened since then... The castle now stand, almost empty, in the middle of nowhere, waiting for a new life.
  6. Somewhere in a small french village is these castle located. Lot of rooms wich a fully furnished and a lot of other stuff are in the rooms. There are also more then 100 books.
  7. Bowling World – Belgium Closed in late 2015. It closed due to a decline in custom and proposed development on the site of this bowling alley and dance hall next door.
  8. Imagine that you are preparing yourself for an exploration for like a month and you are dreaming about it for like a year. Then the day finally arrives and EVERYTHING that could stop us happen at the same time. Not only this was a rainy day, but this was the infamous day that a bridge in Italy collapsed (I think that all of you heard about it), so the viability was totally blocked and we had almost run out of fuel. In addition this bomb shelter was actually really close to the bridge itself so there were many policemen and soldiers in the area. But at the end the exploration went smoothly. About the site itself... This was an air raid shelter built during World War II, but it was reserved only to the workers of a near steel mill. It is 2 kilometers long and it could hold more or less 4500 people. I know that somewhere there are some big cages full of rocks which are designed to protect the bunker from the shock wave of the bombs, but we could't find them. Even if I posted almost all the photos (because I think that all of them are important), here you can find the complete album at higher res: https://flic.kr/s/aHsmgY363L "Move rapidly; don't think only about yourselves, other your comrades are still outside in danger." "Do not stop: move on." Left: "Don't smoke; air polluted by smoke causes illness to many of your comrades; give proof of politeness." Right: "Zone reserved to the P.A.A squads." (I don't know what "P.A.A" stands for) These stairs are completely covered in limestone.
  9. This time I was actually in vacation with two friends of mine (they aren't explorers), but while we were organising all of our trip we decided to explore this abandoned and untouched printing works (hope that this is a proper name) that I had discovered a few weeks before. Those 2 guys were a couple of graphic designers so they enjoyed the visit even more. This plant used to create mostly the "Action Transfers", which are called "Trasferelli" in Italy: today they are produced mostly on commission and not for business. If you want the complete album, here it is: https://flic.kr/s/aHsmr2nWrm
  10. History This Octel site in Amlwch was chosen in 1949 to collect bromine from the sea, it was picked by H Fossett and R O Gibson because of the strong tidal flow, the depth of the sea in the area and gulf stream sea temperatures. The plant was built and finished construction in 1952, ready to start collecting the bromine out of the sea. The site was officially owned by Octel until 1989 when the production of bromine chemicals became more important which resulted in Great Lakes purchasing the site due to them specialising in bromine chemistry. In 1995, one of the BOT2’s that was used for collecting bromine chemicals was badly damaged by a fire that occurred on the site. Two of the 30-metre towers were destroyed and around 5 people were injured. Octel bromine works started their operations in 1952 and closed in 2004. Canatxx purchased the site and announced plans to turn the site into a liquid natural gas storage site. Our Visit This is one site that we have kept our eye on for a while, but never got around to visiting. Finally, we decided to pay the site a little visit and we were not disappointed with what it had to offer. We made sure to visit on a sunny, bright day so we could spend as much time as we needed to explore the whole site. It took us a good few hours to explore the whole site but was definitely worth the time and drive there.
  11. Recently we visited the Jean Monnet building of the European Commission in Luxembourg city, which is about to be demolished. The building was closed because they discovered asbestos in the air in block C. Unfortunately, we came too late and the most interesting part (Conference Centre) was already destroyed, but we managed to see the offices (mostly empty) and the sport centre with swimming pool in the basement. If you decide to go there, don't go to the building C, especially the lower floors!!! They have started demolishing them, we came in to one of the floors, and saw a creepy room completely covered with white film, from floor to ceiling, including doors and windows. Apparently, to protect the workers from asbestos. Just don't go there) Otherwise, buildings A and B are still fine. The keys on one of the pictures are from the data centre. It's now empty, they only left the keys) Here are also a couple of maps in case if someone wants to visit the place. The most interesting thing is that the building is guarded. Security are there 24/7. They are outside near building A, so be careful with the lights! At the level 2, at the border between buildings A and B, I left a short note on the side of one of escalators. You can try to find it) See the last picture, and the place is marked with big yellow circle on one of the maps.
  12. This courthouse is more then 14o years old. It has been empty for some years now and has a lot of treasures to offer. The courthouse is just huge. Many aisles, stairwells, offices and 14 boardrooms. In the entire building is still a lot of equipment available, the heaters are still running and the electricity is not turned off. In the basement, the light is burning in some rooms, files are still lying around and all the electric clocks in the house are still running.
  13. We went to this really impressed location. The security there is very high and some people said it is impossible to get in. We made it without any problems.
  14. Popped out with the new camera yesterday with two friends. Still getting used to it. :D Went to Hi-Finish Castings in Birmingham. From what I could find out with paperwork inside the land was bought in 1935 at a cost of £12,000. In between 1935 and 1941 the building was built and an inventory took place in July 1941 at a cost of £25,269. Various metals were made for all types of products like wall fittings (Sockets and light fixtures) to car parts(Door handles, wing mirror casing and much more) and they had various clients like Bentley, Ford and Talbot. In the early days also Mitchells and Butler where involved in the company. Was a great relaxed explore and even though the main factory space was empty (It had some gems) the offices were great. The safe in the toilet had some wonderful paperwork in it detailing the history. What a depressing canteen though. Windows on all sides with a view of a brick wall. Some wonderful gems about if you look though. Closed in 2008 I believe with a loss of about 42 jobs. Company is no longer about. Enjoy.
  15. Hi all! Another from us, this time an abandoned Nightclub which has huge bank vaults in the 2 separate basements! Enjoy HISTORY: So the building itself was built around 1940 and was designed for the bank of England. The site itself is built with 2 separate basements with one of them being a gold vault containing, you got it, gold. In 1994 it became the 'The Walkabout' however after this didn't go to plan it was then brought out and became Wahoo (Which the signs are still up on the outside of it). It is due to be converted into student accommodation.
  16. Methodist hall Methodist central halls were grand buildings that used to attract thousands of people when the temperance movement was at its strongest. The temperance movement is a social movement against the consumption of alcoholic beverages. Participants in the movement typically criticize alcohol intoxication or promote complete abstinence (teetotalism), leaders emphasizing the sinfulness of drinking as well as the evil effects on personality, family life. Ironically over the years many have been sold off, with some now used as bars and nightclubs. The Methodist Central Hall, Located in Corporation Street, Birmingham, England, is a three storey red brick and terracotta Grade II* listed building with a distinctive tower at the northern end of Corporation Street, opposite the Victoria Law Courts. It is located within the Steelhouse Conservation Area. The terracotta was manufactured by the renowned firm of Gibbs and Canning Limited of Tamworth, which also produced decorative works for 179-203 Corporation Street and the interior of the Victoria Law Courts in Birmingham along with the Natural History Museum in London. The street level has twelve bays of shops (four with their original fronts). The building also runs along Ryder Street and has more original shop fronts. It was built 1903-4 by architects Ewan Harper & James A. Harper at a cost of £96,165. Its main hall seats 2,000 and it has over thirty other rooms including three school halls. In 1991, the Methodist Church was converted into a nightclub; however, this venture closed in 2002. The hall was re-opened on 14 September 2007 as the 'Que club.' The opening night was hosted by 'Drop Beats Not Bombs'. On re-opening the club has seen extensive repairs and improvements to its decor, and regularly hosted events such as Atomic Jam and Fantasia. The site has remained empty since 2016 and has fallen into a state of disrepair in recent years and has had vegetation growing out of the upper floors, prompting Historic England to add it to its 'Heritage at Risk’ register. The building has been the subject of proposals to be converted into an office building. The first of such was submitted in 2001, only to be withdrawn. Planning applications to convert the building into apartments have also been rejected by Birmingham City Council on the basis that original internal features would be destroyed. However, the council has since given planning consent to a proposal to convert the building into apartments. It is to be referred to the Local Government Office. In 2017 it was reported that the Methodists Central hall is set to be transformed into a new £35 million hotel and leisure quarter with a rooftop bar and restaurant. London-based property investor Ciel Capital has unveiled plans to transform the Grade II*-listed Methodist Central Hall into a leisure complex with a hotel, apart-hotel and a mix of retail and food units. DSC_3288 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3289 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3290 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3269 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3267 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3270 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3272 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3277 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3278 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3279 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3280 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3281 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3284 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3287 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3258 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3261 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3282 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  17. Another backlog from a West Country Road Trip back in late May with Mookster, our American explorer friend and myself. This was our second stop off on our first day on the trip; our first being Tone Mills, a revisit for me so I haven't done a report, but with Tone its always a pleasure seeing it. A wonderful site each and every time. The three of us embarked on the large two day road trip in my trusty 1988 Volvo 240 and rocked up in Torrington that morning. This site has been derelict for absolutely years, but its in the arse end of nowhere so its taken a while to see it. - Closed in 1993; Dairy Crest's Creamery sat on a site which had been a creamery since 1874. This particular Art Deco site was built in the 1930's to meet needs, but When the government de-centralised milk collection,the creamery was finally killed off and it closed its doors; a severe blow to the area; with around 200 Job losses. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157699243815344
  18. This place is not too far from where I live. i have heard all about it's history and decided to have a look inside and get some photos of the building itself. The place is an absolute death trap, ceiling's fallen through, water ingress all over etc. It started early life in 1900 as a roman catholic orphanage until 1940 when it became an approved borstal until 1984. During this period there has been reports of physical and sexual abuse which happened at St. Peter's over the years. in 1984 the school closed down and was sold for £130,000. The buyers bought the buildings and converted the main building into a nursing home for the elderly. Again this was in operation until closure in march 1999. The main building was demolished in 2016 due to a massive 9 hour fire and is only the gymnasium and the reception building that remain on the premises. As you can see in the photos the building is severely damaged due to dampness and vandalism.
  19. All, Heres a quick report from another Paris Ghost Station i have now visited. Its one of the larger ghost stations and one of the most well known. Ive not been activley posting much as of late due to other commitments but i am out there exploring and got another big trip lined up this year too. I wont bore you any longer, but heres some history of the station stolen from Google Saint-Martin is a ghost station of the Paris Métro, located on lines 8 and 9 between the stations of Strasbourg - Saint-Denis and République, on the border of the 3rd and 10th arrondissements of Paris. The station was closed on 2 September 1939 at the start of World War II. It reopened after the French Liberation with a lot of traffic passing through, but was eventually closed again as a result of its proximity to the neighboring station of Strasbourg - Saint-Denis, which lies only 100 metres away. In the past, the station served to shelter homeless persons, and the eastern section of the location is currently used as a day shelter for the homeless (managed by the Salvation Army). The station closed on 2nd September 1939. Heres afew of my shots i took Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Saint Martin by Dirty Jigsaw, on Flickr Thanks for looking. DJ
  20. HISTORY Tenterden Town railway station is a heritage railway station on the Kent and East Sussex Railway in Tenterden, Kent, England. When the railway line first opened in 1900, Rolvenden Station was known as "Tenterden". Its name was changed when the line extended north three years later and a station closer to Tenterden was constructed. The new Tenterden Town station opened on 16 March 1903.The line closed for regular passenger services on 4 January 1954 and all traffic in 1961. It reopened on 3 February 1974 under the aegis of the Tenterden Railway Company which bought the line between Tenterden and Bodiam. The station now houses the KESR's Carriage and Wagon works, and the Colonel Stephens Museum is located nearby. EXPLORE So we set out on our explore with a list of places We wanted to check out. After a few not amounting to much and the next couple being total fails, we parked up and regrouped! The Tenterden site had been on my radar for a while (although I couldn’t be 100% about it’s location) so after a little discussion we decided to take a chance and head out to try and find the Lost Railway and its Train Graveyard. We headed toward the closest point by road, parked up and set off along a short path way. The area was really quiet apart from the odd dog walker. After literally five minutes we knew we were in the right place and could see the abandoned trains hidden amongst the trees. Access was easy literally a small hop over the fence and down the bank, there they were! Its the first time any of us had ever done an explore of this nature and it was amazing... Anyway here are some of the pictures we took throughout the explore. Thanks for reading 😊
  21. Millennium tower Salford quays It is not to be confused by the never-built London Millennium Tower (which could’ve gone up to 386 metres!). The dual building is a residential highrise located on the eastern side of the Media City Quays. The tallest one of the two is 67 metres, and the shorter one (Millennium Point) at around 45 metres. Designed to suit the modernised skyline of Salford, it has a rather minimalistic approach. Luckily not a lot of information can be salvaged from the internet, so I don’t have to type up much Had a look on the roof of the millennium tower. Was evening time so photos were late afternoon then a walk around media city. DSC_3193 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3229 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3229 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3221 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3205 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3203 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3198 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3253 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3252 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3244 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3240 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3239 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3234 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3238 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  22. Another season; another backlog, this shiftwork sure makes you a bit slower! I visited this site back at the end of March with Mookster and a non forum member. I have posted several reports after this one, but for some reason this one slipped the net. It was operated by Pilkington Glass up until the 1960's where sand was washed prior to the production of glass. The site is in St Helens, Merseyside and is an absolute mission to get into through mud, undergrowth and then in through a rust water filled basement. Its a wonder non f us fell into the water. I Accidentally shot these in JPEG so the editing is a bit ropey. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157698933151464
  23. A few photos from an exploring roadtrip of Essex and Kent with Mookster and our American explorer friend from back in April. Another backlog, and another one where I managed to set my camera to JPEG. DOHHH!!!! We clambered through some undergrowth and spent about 45 minutes inside. We were in one of the large corridors and heard barking. We absolutely pegged it down the corridor; I'm carrying quite a lot of extra weight so there was no chance to sneak into a side room for 10 mins. We heard the inevitable "OI!" from about 300 yards down the corridor, we'd been seen. I don't believe in running when actually caught; so we turned back and walked up to the security and explained ourselves. He asked us how we got in, marched us to the gate and let us go onto the road right by my car. result! I think our American friend was pleasantly suprised by how easy it went down. - St George's Hospital is a disused hospital situated on Suttons Lane in Hornchurch in the London Borough of Havering, in North East London. It opened its doors in 1939 as "Suttons Institution" and was used during World War II to house airmen from the nearby RAF Hornchurch. In 1948 during its advent into the NHS; it was renamed St George's. The site has remained empty since 2012 and the vacant site has since been transferred into the ownership of NHS Property Services when the company was formed in April 2013. There are plans are in place for a new health centre on site, with the remaining land being converted to housing; Quelle Supríse! #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157693679140750
  24. The history A two-storey mill built in 1831 which resides two miles west of the town centre of Huddersfield. The Financial Reporting Council (FCR) of 1834 shows Armitage Bros already established here. The family name 'Armitage' pre-dates the 14th century, but it was Joseph Armitage (1778-1860) who significantly increased the family fortune and moved decisively into the gentry class. In 1822 he built the first woollen manufacturing mill at Milnsbridge, by the 1840's he handed over control of the business to his sons, who reconstituted it as a partnership called Armitage Bros, which survived until it became a limited company. By 1914 it was part of John Crowther's group. In the late 19th century John Crowther and his two sons moved from Marsden down the Clone Valley to Milnsbridge after purchasing two mills, where they began the successful production of woollen cloth. Crowther took his own life in 1931 and its thought that the death of his wife and the great depression were cumulative in this. Today parts of the mill are rented to a few small business, elsewhere derelict. The explore It's not often where in this neck of the woods... but when we are we always take a trip down Factory Lane. We've attempted this a few times... gates drawn, security breathing down our necks or locals asking us our intentions... seems if your walking round an abandoned building your the local scrap man even though your donning DSLR cameras. Anyway... been one of Crowther's we knew we were in for a treat. so.. sitting waiting.. waiting a bit more... we were in. The sheer size, the beautiful architecture, the remains of the mid century furniture... thank f*uck we drove down for a look. It looks like some of the mill buildings have been demolished at some point... but even so this place is huge!!! On entrance we were presented by a grand entrance hall which led into various areas of the mill... Of note was the sheer amount of mid- century furniture scattered around the mill... an entire floor decked with Parkay flooring... and a rather odd looking exercise bike that reminded us of a SinclairsC-5... we even came across a quad bike dumped in one of the corners of the mill. We loved it hear... its full of little gems hidden here and there we spent quite some time at the old mill as where not sure if we will be able to access this again... Some pics lbe
  25. With an ever lasting itch to explore a prison or police station that needed scratching, the time came to explore Brentwood Police Station. Unfortunately solo but a great explore despite! So after finding a good access point and choosing my moment wisely between passers by, I found myself within the grounds of the police station and soon inside. The building is mostly stripped out and a bare shell but that wasn’t the main sight to see, I had my mind set on finding the cells! After trying every door it was just my luck they were in the last place I looked. Attempting the court house adjacent the police station proved unsuccessful. History courtesy of Mockney Reject
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