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  1. History In 1919 Leeds Corporation rented Meanwood Park to provide a ‘colony’ for the mentally handicapped, which was formally opened on 3rd June 1920, although the first patient had been admitted in the previous year. In 1921 the Corporation bought Meanwood Park estate and surrounding land totalling in all one hundred and seventy eight acres, from Sir Hickman Beckett Bacon of Thonock, Gainsborough, grandson of Sir Thomas Beckett. Originally 87 patients were accommodated in the Hall, but during the following twenty years villas were built in the grounds and by 1941, beds were provided for 841 patients. The Hall by then referred to as ‘The Mansion’ was used for other hospital purposes. MPH was taken over by the NHS in 1948 and administered by Leeds. It is now the responsibility of the Leeds Eastern Health Authority and accommodates about 460 residents. The hospital was controlled by Leeds Corporation. The Hospital trained nurses in a room in the children’s school. Male nurses lived on the wards, on the farm or male hostel. No meals or catering facilities were provided for non resident staff. In 1946 some villas were used by the military for convalescent cases. Most of the Villas were locked. No child under 14 was allowed to visit. Relatives and friends were allowed to visit once a month. Patient’s mail was censored in the Chief Male Nurses office. The CMN was Mr Parson’s. One free stamp a month was issued to patients. Many of the patients at that time were literate. If they behaved they were given a pass which allowed them a few hours weekend parole. Passes were signed by the Medical Superintendent. Patients were awarded 6d per week or a bar of chocolate. The Chief Male Nurse and the Matron were paid on the number of beds. They had their own sides of the hospital, male and female patients mixed only at dances and church services. A few historical photo's I found online Visit I visited with @hamtagger at the beginning of December. i'd seen this pop up online and quite liked the look of it. Now I will say, there really isn't much to see at all but I was really happy with the place. The decay was nice and mature, had some nice features reminiscent of its times. The whole place is surrounded by a newly built residential estate with the closest house literally 75 years away from the Hall itself and its like this all around. we had quite a nice leisurely paced explore round it, a really random room in the middle of the place with really modern furniture which threw us a little bit. The explore became a bit smelly about 3/4 of the way through when @hamtagger decided he needed a shit. I'm pretty sure he even killed a few pigeons with the stench! now you'd think that with a nice airy building the smell would disappear quite quickly and I'm not one to be bothered much by smells but even I was heaving. So, apologies to future explorers although I'm sure its safe now! 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Thanks for looking!
  2. The history of the Albanian Navy dates back to 1925, following the creation of the Albanian Republic. Albanian naval forces operate out of two main bases; Bishti-i-Palles in Durrës, and Pasha Liman in Vlorë, with four reserve bases respectively in Shëngjin, Porto Palermo, Saranda and a submarine base on Sazan island. The vessels of the Albanian naval force are mostly patrol craft and support craft as well as four whisky class submarines (Soviet Union built in the early Cold War period) which have been taken out of service at Pasha Liman. In Shëngjin a Soviet built minesweeper M-111 and an AFD-115 gunship remain abandoned at the entrance to a bunker. The Albanian navy still operates out of Shëngjin in a low capacity so it's still an active military zone but you are allowed to drive through it to reach a beach resort on the other side. Handy for us! Visited with adders, extreme_ironing, otter and reenie. Here's what we found.... AFD Mujo Ulqinaku M-111 - A mine warfare ship designed for the location of and destruction of naval mines which combines the role of a minesweeper and minehunter in one hull. Minesweepers are equipped with mechanical or electrical devices, known as "sweeps", for disabling mines, so waterways are maintained clear for safe shipping. This one appears to have been disused since 1996 (the date of a calendar on board), just prior to the Albanian civil war, when many vessels of the Albanian navy were seriously damaged. Behind it sits this half-submerged AFD P115 - Albanian Navy gunship (Chinese type 62 "Shanghai-II") which has had its 57mm gun mount removed They sit in front of the entrance to a navigable bunker which was inaccessible. Another entrance parallel was also sealed although we reached the blast door for that one The AFD Mujo Ulqinaku M111 was named after Mujo Ulqinaku, an Albanian sergeant of the Royal Albanian Navy, known for his resistance to the Italian forces during the Italian Invasion of Albania in 1939. Armed with only a machine gun, he was placed at the centre of the defense line and fought uninterruptedly until he was eventually killed by an artillery shell from an Italian warship in the last hour of the battle. He was given the People's Hero of Albania award posthumously. On board the AFD - M111 An old gun at the front You can see an active patrol boat moored up on the left of the shot Inside the AFD - M111 Communications cabin A small engine room Hatches and squat toilets Kitchen All the cabins were locked except for this one Some old military posters Back on land, this AFD S104 - Huchuan class 'motor torpedo boat' is waiting to be scrapped. Powered by Soviet-era engines, these hydrofoil-equipped boats are capable of 50 knots (93 km/h; 58 mph) and carry two torpedo tubes for torpedoes, with some known to be armed with naval mines. A few dilapidated buildings remain nearby This building to the left was manned but we were just out of view so we took a quick peek at these old military vehicles Some rusty torpedoes lay on the ground alongside one of them A couple of old trucks overgrown by vegetation above the bunker. We were aware of someone from the base heading in our direction at this point so we hopped in the car and made tracks We made it to the beach resort on the other side of the military zone where unfortunately the pigs were waiting for us. Thankfully they just grunted a bit and we were on our way 😮 Just in time to catch the sunset! Thanks for looking
  3. In classic Harry style; this forms part of another explore backlog! I visited here in November 2018 with Mookster. It formed part of a little Midland Roadtrip we did that day. We all know what to expect with this place; its pretty pillaged now, access was a doddle and it was full of other explorers; something which seems to be a much more frequent occurrence these days! We met some really nice people here and had a relaxed half hour or so before moving to the next site. The Typhoo Tea Factory, founded by John Summer in 1903 and was known a local landmark in Birmingham. Tea production began here in the 30's; and survived bombing by the Luftwaffe in WW2. in 1968; Typhoo merged with Schweppes and with Cadbury the following year, forming Cadbury-Schweppes. The factory eventually closed in 1978 as a tea making facility; but remained open as a clothes warehouse until around 2008. The grounds, which are currently being used as a 148-space pay and display car park (very handy for exploring!), have been granted planning permission as part of a £14 million project to turn the site into a brand new university campus for the Birmingham City University. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 Thanks for Looking, more at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157704773968425
  4. Visited back in November with Mookster after seeing the Typhoo Factory. Another one ticked off the list which has been kicking about for years. I really enjoyed this one; though quite bare and largely sealed, it had a lot of nice things to see down there. The air was pretty bad though in places! History - Borrowed! The ‘Shadow Factory Tunnels’ are what remain of Lord Austin’s secret plans that were created to increase the force of the British military against the German military aggression in the arms race that led up to the start of the Second World War. Munitions workers produced Merlin engines to power Spitfires and Hawker Hurricanes which were used to regain control of the British skies during the 1940 Battle of Britain. The Shadow Scheme involved two stages; the building of nine new factories and the extension of existing factories. This extension included here; the Longbridge plant. Australian-born industrialist and Conservative MP, Lord Austin, whom founded Austin Motors; had already contributed to the war effort during the First World War, turning his factories to munitions and engine production. The tunnels which ran beneath Austin Rovers Longbridge plant are mostly all that is left of the plant; a large housing development increases in size upon the former footprint. These tunnels ensured that production of the engines and munitions could continue underground in relative safety. After WWII; the factory returned to producing automobiles and the tunnels were soon abandoned. By the late 60s, the plant was the second largest car plant in the world. After the collapse of MG Rover, the site saw its redevelopment. Famously; a mini was kept down here after workers damaged it in the 70s and it was hidden from bosses. The mini is now in a museum. This is a very small portion of the tunnels. Lots is bricked up #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17
  5. I had been waiting to do this one for a month or so; but simply hadn't found the time to hop on the M40 and up to Brum. It was a good opportunity to meet up with some explorers whom I have been chatting to for the best part of ten years or so and do an explore at the same time! We arrived here mid morning one Sunday and once inside; the beauty of the place was revealed! I really loved this place. Again though; it was full of the new age era of explorers; about a dozen of them, some videoing and some just shooting photos. It's rare you bump into a person on explores, but lately its been every explore. This one was flavour of the month back in the summer though!! After the explore, we went to Costco for a cheap lunch in the canteen there and had a nice, chilled drive around the local area looking for other sites The Hall, built between 1903 and 1904 by architects Ewan Harper and James Harper and the terracotta was made by Gibbs and Canning ltd of Tamworth, is situated at the northern end of Corporation Street in Birmingham. The hall is a 3 storey red brick and terracotta building with Grade II Listing on it, with 2000 seats in the main halll over 30 additional rooms including 3 school halls. By 1991, the building had been converted into a nightclub which closed in 2002, but reopened as the Q Club in 2007. This club's last event at the premises was "Flashback" in 2011. During its time as a Night Club 3 deaths were reported. -A punter jumped off the tower in 1998 -A clubber OD'd in 2000 -A stabbing outside in 2008. The Club reopened in 2012, but closed in 2016. In 2018; Birmingham city council granted planning permission to convert it into a 147 room hotel costing £35 million. Works have begun and are expected to be complete by 2020. I just love the contrast between old and new here; with the older Methodists Hall and the big, modern buildings springing up around it. There is a live part of the building and as we were there, a Gospel Band were practicing literally behind the wall; a strong scent of Jerk Chicken was filling the rooms of the abandoned part. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 Thanks for Looking, more of the Hall at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157674880523028
  6. So back in August (yes I'm slow as ever!); a non-explorer friend and myself visited The Springs in Wallingford, which at the time was a bit of a local tourist trap; but it was an afternoon out! It had really dawned on me at this point which way this hobby is going these days. No word of a lie; there was at least 15 people in that hotel, all this new wave of "YouTube Explorer" we all have our opinions of. They were all nice enough there and then, but a couple were very, very loud and had small children with them. Inevitably, a member of staff of the live Golf Course this was on came and flushed everyone out, myself and my friend sat in an old en-suite upstairs and waited for it to die down. After that; we explored for an hour and a half or so; not much to see here, fairly plain, but it was an enjoyable day out. Upon exit the same Golf Course Staff found us, but were polite and we were on our way. The original build dates back to 1874; a Mock Tudor Style building, this Victorian Villa has been massively altered and extended from the original. Rock Star Ian Gillan of Deep Purple, purchased the villa in 1973 and was behind its and installed a guitar shaped swimming pool in the grounds behind the building before its later conversion into a 32 bedroom hotel. The last owners bought the hotel in 1995 and added a large golf course and club to the grounds. The Springs finally closed in 2014 after the owners could no longer afford the vast upkeep. The Golf Club however; voted one of the best in Oxfordshire is still open. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 As Always Guys, Thank You. More Hotel At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157674868589418
  7. A n abandoned hospital that did not meet the new norms. It took some effort to gain access to this one. I did this one alone so my senses were working overtime. First thing I heard was the tik tak of some mechanical clocks so i named this one l'hopital tiktak. Electricity is still on, sensors of the automatic doors and lights still working. Went to a great part of this massive hospital but still not seen everything because I was expecting security tu turn op any moment so after less then 1h30 I went back home. Maybe I'll revisit this one soon for the other parts. Missed the morgue. Hope you enjoy this. 1 going up IMG_3506-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 2 go into the light IMG_3503-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 3 where is the lab result? IMG_3509-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 4 working in the sunshine IMG_3510-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 5 lay down your head IMG_3500-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 6 at an angle IMG_3497-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 7 flashing re light IMG_3496-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 8 OK 1 start the timer IMG_3493-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 9 take a rest IMG_3488-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 10 backache IMG_3466-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 11 the underground IMG_3463-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 12 spare material room IMG_3461-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 13 ok2 also in the race IMG_3471-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
  8. Not a bad little mooch this one. Quite a lot of area to cover with most of it being stripped unfortunately but, there is still stuff to see and some nice decay in parts. It seems the building was used to make carpet underlay form 2002 until 2013. I guess its been abandoned since then. Visited with non member Paul. History The Arrol-Johnston Motor Co., which had been in operation since 1896, opened its Dumfries factory at Heathhall in July 1913. The manager, Thomas Charles Pullinger, had been inspired by the Albert Kahn designed factories of Henry Ford in America. Kahn provided the design for the Dumfries factory, and it bears more than a passing resemblance to Ford's Highland Park factory in Detroit. The Heathhall factory was said to be the most advanced light engineering factory of its day in Scotland. The site was purchased by the North British Rubber Company in 1946. It then became Uniroyal Ltd in the 60's, and in 1987 changed yet again to the British subsidiary of the Gates Rubber Company. It has been known as Interfloor since 2002. . Thanks For Looking More pics on my Flicker page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157670753473708/with/43157314391/
  9. A location I did on my own . After a nice walk I reached the site. Some parts of there seems still t be in use. One building had some new looking alarms and no windows were damaged. First building I tried seems lead to nothing. Walked in a cellar with still a lot of cables, a new looking fusebox and no trash. There was no way to go further up so I tried the other buildings. Still needed to do some climbing but then the explore could start. It looked like a small coal mine the closes a few decades ago. Spent there a few hours. At one moment there was a car going over the terrain. Not sure if it was security or not but I waited hidden in a dark corner of the building for some time. Nothing happened and I started going to the exit. Hope you enjoy the picture. 1 I was hooked IMG_2740-Pano-Edit-2 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 2 spin that wheel IMG_2939 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 3 total control IMG_2929-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 4 the curtains closed for this mine IMG_2924 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 5 no errors IMG_2897-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 6 to much tension IMG_2888 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 7 gear up IMG_2852-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 8 spin me arround IMG_2829-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 9 puch it IMG_2798-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 10 goodbye IMG_2844-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
  10. In these buildings was produced from 1900 to 2009. However, the origin of production goes back to the 14th century.
  11. was lucky enough to spend 3 days in the exclusion zone earlier this year; some shote within the former USSR "secret" Radar Station
  12. I think ill just let the pics do the talking as im lost for words on this one , ... visted with the elusive and adam plenty of battery operated adult content , you have been warned lol thanks for looking
  13. Premier inn Manchester Visited with @GK-WAX and @vulex we was after a little get together so decided on a nice relaxed evening chilling on the Manchester skyline. After a very hot day was good to unwind and take in Liverpool he view and watch the world go by below us. DSC_3169 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3172 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3175 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3165 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3152 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3150 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3134 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3117 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3187 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3184 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3183 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3180 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3182 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3121 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3135 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3138 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3148 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3153 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3157 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3161 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3162 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3164 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3176 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  14. Millennium tower Salford quays It is not to be confused by the never-built London Millennium Tower (which could’ve gone up to 386 metres!). The dual building is a residential highrise located on the eastern side of the Media City Quays. The tallest one of the two is 67 metres, and the shorter one (Millennium Point) at around 45 metres. Designed to suit the modernised skyline of Salford, it has a rather minimalistic approach. Luckily not a lot of information can be salvaged from the internet, so I don’t have to type up much Had a look on the roof of the millennium tower. Was evening time so photos were late afternoon then a walk around media city. DSC_3193 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3229 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3229 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3221 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3205 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3203 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3198 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3253 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3252 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3244 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3240 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3239 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3234 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3238 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  15. Had a look in here earlier in the year after an fail near by. A grand example of dereliction on the outside and a crumbing mess on the inside. Nice little wander as it turned out. There is enough features and bits still knocking about to make it interesting and I enjoyed having a look around and getting some snaps. Visited with non member Paul. History The Crown opened in 1899 as the Lyceum Theatre. The intention was to provide a luxury theatre for Shakespeare productions and drama as well as revue. It is a landmark building in the town of Eccles in a vaguely Elizabethan Style with pilasters and mullioned windows. The facade is constructed of moulded red brick of five storeys with terracotta dressings to three high arched windows at first floor. It is richly decorated, and has an asymmetrically placed short corner tower. This once had a pyramidal roof and the parapet was topped with square pinnacles. The cast iron copy still survives, now encased. The auditorium was designed with three balconies, supported by four columns. The ornamentation of the proscenium comprised an allegorical representation of Shakespeare's 'Seven Ages of Man'. The act drop was a facsimile of Beverley's noted work for the opening of the Theatre Royal (Manchester) in 1845 - a Grecian subject painted by Mr Keith. Becoming a cinema in 1932, it was later adapted for Cinemascope, ending stage use. Converted for bingo in 1963, by the late 1980s it was reported to be falling into disrepair internally. The exterior is largely intact, apart from the stage house which has been partly demolished. Planning permission was given in 2005 - and again in 2008 - for partial demolition (retaining the facade) and development of apartments behind. Since then the building has become more dilapidated and a new planning application for a residential and retail development submitted in 2016 proposes complete demolition of the theatre. . Thanks For Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157693704356862/with/42124774351/
  16. I have sat on this one for a fair while.earlier in the year I made quite a lot of trips here trying to find various bits of it.I had been on a visit here years ago and saw some bits,but I knew there was so much more to it.being near to me it was essy to go regularly to check it out.there is security on the site and cameras.so you just have to be a bit careful.Coltishall is now used as an industrial estate with many old buildings in use.it started off as battle of Britain fighter base during the second world war.fighter planes off various sorts were flown from here including hurricanes and spitfires.after the war it was used heavily in the cold war and was designated as a V bomber dispersal site.basically a back up airfield if the aircrafts hme airfield was damaged.the last planes to be based here was the jaguar jets.these saw service in the first gulf war.with the introduction of the euro fighter Coltishall was deemed none essential and so the station closed in 2006.it was a big question what was going to happen to the site.then Norfolk county council stepped in and bought it and this raised a few eyebrows.there track record is not great. SERGEANTS MESS I have visited the officers mess a few times meeting up with pretty vacant and JSP o one time as they visited too.the sergeants mess though is like the officers mess but not so grand.here the NCO's could relax and unwind,there was accommodation provided on the wings and a new block added. The more modern accommodation blocks. RECREATION As usual with the armed forces recreation is a big factor.on coltishall there was a pool,gym and five aside football plus fields for grass sports.sadly the gym is a no go now. BATTERY MAINTENANCE This building was for storage off batteries for planes and veichles.jet planes carry some hefty batteries so a place was needed to store them safely,also there was a bit at the front for testing and draining the batteries.it had a morgue feel to it and now known as the battery morgue. BOMB STORES AND FUEL A different way in was needed to do these as they are a fair way from the main site.and with CCTV covering the way down I did not want to get caught in the open.like most airfields the bomb stores are located a fair way from the main base for safety.and near to where they would take off.here there was a large building for testing the bombs and making sure they were safe.nearby is the fuel stores.not sure if these were for the planes or not. Fuelling depot HANGAR AS per standard there are four hangars here.several are in use.most of the maintenance work on the planes went on in here.to the sides there is offices and canteen areas.there was seriously nice airmans graffiti in here. JET TESTING With the advancement of jet engines on planes there was a need to test the engines.coltishall had two testing parts,an indoor and an outdoor one.the out door one allowed the planes to back up to the exhaust duct and fire up its engines which would then be passed through the exhaust duct and through the chambers.the test bay is surrounded by thick concrete blast walls. The indoor one was a similar style to the other.but this was used for engines unattached to the plane.acroos the way is another building,this was were they would repair the engines,they would then be transported to the tester.clamps on a rail would move across and grab the engine.it would then be moved to the exhaust duct for testing.note the array of cameras around the clamping system to monitior the testing process. The indoor one was a similar style to the other.but this was used for engines unattached to the plane.acroos the way is another building,this was were they would repair the engines,they would then be transported to the tester.clamps on a rail would move across and grab the engine.it would then be moved to the exhaust duct for testing.note the array of cameras around the clamping system to monitior the testing process. Thank you for looking.I did take lots more photos here but I could be forever on this post .with more smaller buildings.
  17. The hospital was closed less than three years ago. The facility has functioned, among others orthopedics and traumatology, rheumatology, pulmonology and surgery. The total area of the facility is about 2.38 ha. As of today, little souvenirs remain in the middle. The only thing left was the lamps in the operating rooms and some glass equipment somewhere in the attic. Despite everything, the hospital has an amazing atmosphere ... until you want to walk the long corridors. The hospital is not haunted, it has no ghosts ... it is guarded ... motion detectors, cameras and a dog make the entrance into the wild border with a miracle. Thanks to this the building is in very good condition .... (Sorry, translator)
  18. One I did on my own. Was in that neighbourhood on a non urbex occasion. Was travelling light with only the camera and my tripod. Parked the car some distance away and walked over there. Once inside it was surprisingly quit busy there (I thing 8 persons) in a closed shop). One of the persons was carting a baby. It looked like a family day out to me. Went upstairs and waited to come down when the people were gone. Strange to see so much stuff still in the shelf's. 1 IMG_3003-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 2 IMG_2977-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 3 IMG_2958-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 4 IMG_2990-HDR-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 4 IMG_2998-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 6 IMG_2981-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 7 IMG_2961-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 8 IMG_2960-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
  19. A nice and fully furnished Maison in a small village in France.
  20. It's been a long time that I posted something here. Missing the time for the editing of the photo's. This was my last explore and it was an underground adventure with the same partner of all the underground explores. It's was an iron mine that closed several decades ago like many others in that neighbourhood.It was a nice walk to find an entrance (not the main entrance ). It was inside warmer than outside. This time only one level explored but probably there are more entry's because there was also some kind of elevator (not found thou but other explorer did). There were a lot of collapses places. All the timber was parished and the metal well rusted. Also some cracks in the ceiling. Nice that there were some painted street names on the wall (some in German, other in French). There was every ware since of life ( fungi's, in white and yellow). Animal bones, one bat and animal excrements that turned in something fluffy by the fungi that were growing on that). For the rest the mine was well stripped of almost all the rails and cables. But never the less, a nice trip. 1 it's going to be a bumpy ride IMG_3050 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 2 hold on to the railing IMG_3048-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 3 end of the line IMG_3045-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 4 big pulley (fisheye) IMG_3041-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 5 tunnel of fungi life in white and yellow IMG_3037-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 6 that cart didn't make it out IMG_3034 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 7 stack 'm up IMG_3031 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 8 light in the" pouderie" IMG_3026-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 9 the main tunnel IMG_3009-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 10 iron bows IMG_3014 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 10 dancing on the ceiling IMG_3018-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
  21. This turned out to be a good day out with @SpiderMonkey and Exxperious. This is a big site, by far the largest RAF base I've explored in terms of area covered, so we spent the whole day looking around it. History of RAF Bentwaters RAF Bentwaters is a former Royal Air Force station in Suffolk, named after Bentwater Cottages, two small houses that stood on the site of the main runway prior to its construction. Construction of the base began in 1942 for use by RAF Bomber Command and opened for operational use in April 1944. In December that year it was transferred to No. 11 Group, RAF Fighter Command. The runways were constructed in the typical RAF layout of one main runway diagonally intersected by two secondary runways, forming a triangle. The base was used by the RAF during the Second World War, and then used by the United States Air Force from 1951 until 1993, primarily for efforts during the Cold War. Bentwaters was to play a key role in the defence of Western Europe during the Cold War when large numbers of USAF aircraft were assigned as part of the air arm of NATO. Current Uses Bentwaters was handed back to the UK Ministry of Defence in 1993 and was subsequently closed. Now known as Bentwaters Parks, the site is used as a business park and filming location. Owners are constantly developing the filming and production facilities available at the site. Movies and TV programmes filmed there include Derren Brown's Apocalypse, movies The Numbers Station and Fast & Furious 6, along with some Top Gear stunts, amongst others. In 2007 the Bentwaters Cold War Museum opened, including tours of the fully restored “War Operations Room” and “Battle Cabin”. Aerial view of the site after becoming Bentwaters Parks Star Wars Building The so-called “Star Wars Building” is surrounded by concrete blast walls and contains some interesting spaces including a medical room. The Star Wars Building Concrete blast walls Entrance of the Star Wars Building Medical Facility Bomb Stores Built during the Cold War to securely store nuclear and conventional weapons, the bomb store was heavily fortified with three layers of fencing, razor wire, a swing-arm vehicle barrier, two gates, pressure pads, armoured guard house, guard tower and overhead cables to keep helicopters out. We didn’t get passed the gate! Entrance to the Bomb Stores Armoured Guard House One of the storage facilities with overhead cables One of the store buildings had a couple of old fire engines parked up behind it.... Planes and Helicopters There are all sorts of jet aeroplanes and helicopters parked up around the site, in varying states of decay and dismantlement. Exxperious modelling his entry into "Miss Fighter Jet 2018" K-9 Building The K-9 building contains spacious dog kennels. K-9 Building Kennels inside the K-9 Building Hangers The site has a lot of hardened aircraft shelters, or hangers, spread out across a vast area. Several are in use by private companies, and others are empty. A common feature of the hangers is the huge sliding doors that form the entire hanger's frontage – these slide to the side on rails to open up fully allowing access for aeroplanes. One of the many hangers Typical interior of the hangers Original sliding door controls The framework sits on rails and supports the huge doors, allowing them to slide fully open 527th Aggressor Squadron Hardened Aircraft Shelter Deputy Commander Operations This building had been out of use for quite some time and is suffering a lot of decay. The moisture and condensation cause constant rainfall inside the building, which was ideal for plant growth. Deputy Commander Operations building Runway, Control Tower and Maintenance Vehicles We didn’t make it over to the control tower, which is situated within the live business park area of the site. The runway still has some of the maintenance and de-icing vehicles parked up. The Control Tower pictured in 1972 The Control Tower today (poor quality due to crazy crop, as we didn't go over there!) North/South runway with the control tower in the distance De-icer truck The Hush House Originally built as a jet engine testing facility with an exhaust tunnel, the Hush House was a soundproofed hangar where fighter Exterior of the exhaust tunnel Interior of the Hush House The exhaust tunnel Hush House control booth and viewing window Thanks for looking! Of course I got a selfie!
  22. Tkvarcelli was an important coal mining town in the war torn region of Abkhazia, a de facto independent republic which remains internationally recognised as part of Georgia. During the Abkhazian war (from 1992 to 93), Tkvarcheli withstood, through Russian humanitarian and military aid, an uneasy siege by the Georgian forces. As a result of the war the town's industries all but stopped and its population has since decreased from approximately 22,000 to just 5,000 people. Abkhazia is on the list of places where the FCO (Foreign & Commonwealth Office) advises against all travel. There is no UK consulate support if anything goes wrong so if you were to lose your passport for example, you'd be pretty fucked. With that in mind, and having read a few horror stories of tourists being aggressively robbed around Tkvarcelli, we were pretty skeptical about coming here. Thanks to some advice from @Olkka, who visited earlier in the year, we chose to hire a driver who knew the area well and we didn't encounter any problems. Top tip of the day - take a bottle of vodka for the guys demolishing the power plant and you'll be reet. Tkvarcelli power plant has seen better days. On the upper levels there were holes in the floor everywhere, hidden by overgrown plants and moss. We tried to be extra careful although it was difficult to tell if any structure we were standing on was safe. There were workers actively demolishing the roof above one end of the plant as well so we had to stick to the opposite end. Thankfully that's where all the good stuff was. The only other obstacle was the squatters but they didn't seem to mind us being there. Workers were sporadically dropping huge sections of roof onto the ground from above Much has been dismantled The Squatters Manoeuvring around this building was so sketchy These stairs were clinging on by dear life. We went up these but the stairs above were completely mangled Nope Coal conveyor chute Control Room. Pretty battered but I loved it in here The central turbine. I may have got a bit carried away photographing this. It would be amazing to have seen this in its hey day. Akarmara was a nearby mining town. Wars and economic change have emptied the town of the 5,000 people who lived there in the 1970s leaving it pretty much a ghost town. Now it is estimated only 35 people remain. It's completely cut off except for a rocky road full of potholes that takes around an hour to navigate. On our arrival we were greeted by some strange looks from the elderly locals, although the local children seemed fascinated by us and one accompanied us for our whole time there. It's a very surreal place where buildings that have a light outside signify that they are lived in. This is to ward off any looters. None of the buildings look lived in otherwise as they are all falling apart. The train station has been completely reclaimed by the forest. This building was completely trashed except for one flat in the middle inhabited by a young family. Thanks for looking.
  23. HMP Holloway was the largest women’s only prison in Europe until its closure in 2016. Rebuilt between 1971 to 1985, the prison's design was intended to produce an atmosphere more like a hospital than a prison. This design was recognised as a failure in the 1980s as its lack of traditional wings or landings, and a maze of corridors, means warders had difficulty monitoring inmates. Entrance to the rebuilt prison (CC Licence) The history of Holloway dates back to 1852 when the original prison opened as a mixed-sex establishment, but due to the increasing demand for space for female prisoners, it became female-only in 1903. Inmates of the original prison included Oscar Wilde, and more recently Moors murderess Myra Hindley from 1966. The original Holloway Prison (public domain image) Holding female adults and young offenders either sentenced by the courts or being held on remand, the prison consisted mostly of single cells, but there was also various dormitory accommodation. In January 2016 an inquest into the death of Sarah Reed, a paranoid schizophrenic being held on remand, identified failings in the care system. The prison was closed in July 2016, with plans for it to be sold for housing. Time to start the unofficial tour.... Wandering between the modern buildings within the prison grounds Let's head straight into the cells... Dorm room Single prisoner cell Another dorm room Mural in one of the many winding corridors Twin room Lots of peely paint in some places There were several styles of cell Entrance into the prison... Prisoner transport vehicles would park inside this area, and the gates closed behind them The front entrance leads into this area, with a command room behind the glass Corridors lead into the prison Each area separated by iron gates Prisoner amenities and facilities Entrance into the "family friendly" visitor centre. Visitors and prisoners could be kept separated in these divided rooms The prison had a swimming pool for prisoners to use And gym facilities The glazed walkway was decorated by inmates The prison had a medical ward, including its own opticians Pharmacy Covered walkway leading to the chapel. Note the high-security walls The chapel was large but pretty basic More inmate artwork Mural inside one of the rooms A room for presentations The prison's boiler house Exterior of the buildings within the prison walls High fences divided the exterior areas
  24. I visited this place back in March this year but was unable to get, so all I did was a video of the outside.. https://youtu.be/zHgUYWhIeCk But as I was going past the place on route to another I thought Id give it another try, bingo I was in, nature has certainly taken over now. and its been well and truly plundered https://youtu.be/HIWBL1nx5pU
  25. Tskaltubo was a popular spa resort, famous for its healing mineral waters and radon bath treatments. The first sanatoriums with in-patient facilities were built in 1925 and in 1931 Tskaltubo was designated as a spa resort by the Soviet government. Under the communist regime, a spa break was a prescribed, and mostly compulsory, annual respite, as the “right to rest” was inscribed in the Russian constitution. A visit to the doctors could result in being dispatched to somewhere like Lithuania or Georgia where spa towns were renowned for the healing properties of their mineral waters. It was one of Stalin’s favourite vacation spots. During WWII, the hotels were used as hospitals but after the war, their popularity increased and by the 1980s Tskaltubo was one of the most sought-after tourist destinations in the Soviet Union. Georgia’s independence in 1991 and the fall of the Soviet Union in late December 1991, signalled the collapse of Tskaltubo’s spa industry. Without guests, most of the hotels and resorts were forced to close their doors. Today many of them are home to refugees who fled the conflict in Abkhazia in 92/93 and needed to be rehoused. This one however has been fenced off and remains empty behind a fence with 24 hour security patrols. Apparently it was bought by a local millionaire who has plans to turn it into a luxury hotel although those plans appear to have stalled. I was a bit nervous about this one as we'd seen security the night before and they looked like regular police. The signs on the fence suggested they were 'security police' and their website claims they operate under the control of the Ministry of Internal Affairs of Georgia. We very nearly had a run in with one of them patrolling but managed to make a quick getaway thankfully. I really enjoyed it in here. We'd not seen any internal pictures so it was a proper treat to discover what was inside. The theatre was absolutely stunning. Visited with Elliot5200 on what was a great trip to a fascinating country! Thanks for looking.
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