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  1. Red Cross Hospital History Before it's closure at some point during the 1980's, it served as a children's hospital. It was thought to have been founded around the turn of the 20th century. The hospital was owned and managed by the charity 'Red Cross Italy' which becomes apparent from the rather large red cross on the ceiling of the chapel. The building itself resides near the edge of the mountain, roughly about 1100 metres above sea level which was a common practice for medical facilities Italy. It was believed that the air was fresher up in the mountains, more therapeutic and held medicinal properties, which was beneficial for the treatment of the patients. Our Visit Visited with @aWorldinRuins and @Ninja Kitten on a recent trip to Italy. This was the first stop on the tour and a revisit for myself. I was glad to go back, it's a very beautiful and photogenic location, in my opinion. I loved seeing all the beds, the chapel and the little classrooms again. As always, hope you enjoy my report! If you've got this far, thanks for reading
  2. Town Mansion History The Town Mansion was originally built in 1912 by a wealthy petroleum importer. During the early 20th century, the area in which the mansion was built, had become a hub for many rich German families in the early 1900's. By 1918, once the First World War had come to an end and the town was heavily damaged by the intense bombing raids at the start of the war and then German occupation of Belgium in 1914. Only two houses in that street survived, the Town Mansion being one of those. It was then later occupied by a Belgium shipbuilder until the late 1960's, when it was used as an office space. The mansion was abandoned in 1991 and hasn't been formally resided in since. Visit Visited with @PROJ3CTM4YH3M and a non forum member. As I recall it was a particularly hot spring day and we all excited to see this location, partly to escape from the intense heat. Once we got inside we spent a short amount of time wandering around before we eagerly started taking our pictures. I can confidentially say that this is one of the grandest mansions in Belgium I have visited. I did wonder what the lives of the families that once inhabited it were like and the memories they must have had. It was a very enjoyable explore for me and as always, I hope you enjoy my photos! If you got this far, thanks for reading
  3. The hospital was closed less than three years ago. The facility has functioned, among others orthopedics and traumatology, rheumatology, pulmonology and surgery. The total area of the facility is about 2.38 ha. As of today, little souvenirs remain in the middle. The only thing left was the lamps in the operating rooms and some glass equipment somewhere in the attic. Despite everything, the hospital has an amazing atmosphere ... until you want to walk the long corridors. The hospital is not haunted, it has no ghosts ... it is guarded ... motion detectors, cameras and a dog make the entrance into the wild border with a miracle. Thanks to this the building is in very good condition .... (Sorry, translator)
  4. An early partial visit of blast furnaces with @Himeiji that ended by being caught by securitas, who called another security crew, who called the cops...... I wanna go back there but I don't know if I should :s Hell, Mittal's a bitch, but a beautiful one xD
  5. Being a regular at the Nurburgring and this place being brought to my attention by a non explorer, the perfect opportunity after a day of storms arose! Putting this one off all week with temperatures reaching the 30s, the moment came on a somewhat stormy day to check this place out, taking full advantage of the slightly cooler – yet humid air. My first explore out of the UK too which made for something special, despite being a derp it was still something different and unique for myself in comparison to the UK. There’s not much left of the place and the history is scarce, however it looks as though work began rebuilding the place but the cost of development was a spanner in the works. The basement also contained a septic tank which is no longer allowed in the region, combining that with the nearest sewer being some distance away making development even more expensive.
  6. It’s been a while for various reasons but I am back and hitting the “move along, nothing to see here” central resource library… no seriously, nothing to see here. So after a brief chat with who turned out to be a long time reader and follower through instagram, we chose a spot to meet and hit the central resource library. Now to be honest, I was pre warned over a year ago that this place is absolutely trashed and I can confirm exactly that but it’s one I can now tick off the list. There’s not much to see, unless smashed windows and terrible graffiti is your thing so there is a lack of photos and hardly warranting a report, but here we go anyway! History wise? It’s a library… it closed and moved to a new location, that’s pretty much all I can say!
  7. History Brampton Park Officers' Mess is a former country house, then used by RAF Support Command at RAF Brampton. Brampton Park dates back to the 12th century and the house, known as the Grange, was built in 1821-22 to designs by Thomas Stedman Whitewell. It was altered in 1825 by John Buonarotti Papworth. The main part of the house burned down in 1907 and was rebuilt and extended on the east side in red brick to form a symmetrical design. The south facade is constructed from yellow brick and the roof is tiled. The north front of the house incorporates one of the surviving 19th Century wings as its west end and the 19th Century Pump Room survives on the first floor of the north-west wing. During the First World War, the house was used to house German prisoners. At the beginning of the Second World War it was used as the 'Sun Babies Nursery', to house about 100 infants evacuated from North London. In 1942 the house was taken over by the United States Army Corps (HQ 1st Air Division) until 1945-6. In late Spring 1945, Headquarters Technical Training Command moved to Brampton from Shinfield Park. The Grange became the headquarters and the personnel were billeted in the Park. The house was used as the headquarters of various RAF Command and Group Headquarters from 1955 onwards. In 1982 the upper floor of the building was damaged in a fire and in 1987 a refurbishment programme was carried out on the house, completed in 1988. In 2012 RAF Brampton was put for disposal by the Ministry of Defence. The Explore Visited with @hamtagger this had been one we had wanted to visit for a little while and not too far from us either. Pleasantly surprised about the location, still had a RAF feel to it especially over the back of the area where the married quarters are still lived in but the vast majority of the site has been demo'd with masses of new houses built on site to replace the old MOD buildings. What is left is enough though with quite a lot of the features retained, as you will see from the above history part of it burnt down some time ago so I would guess thats why half of it is relatively modern in design. This was one of the most leisurely explores I have had. Having heard that people have had the police rung and escorted off, locals keeping their eyes open for people coming and going we were pretty lucky. In and out unnoticed, just how I like it! Anyway, the pics. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Thanks for looking!
  8. One of the objects located in the campsite. Why a house is bad. When I was inside, alone ... there was a squeaky door from everywhere and the cracking of the boards against each other. The blame for all this is borne by the wind and frost ... however, when you sit in such an object yourself, different thoughts come to mind. In fact, I was not alone ... my friend was outside ... but the distance between us (at a given moment and situation) was comparable to the width of the Vistula (in fact it was enough to just walk out the window). Great property, amazing atmosphere ... great rooms .... (Translator...sorry)
  9. A large abandoned iron mine with miles of tunnels and several levels. We've been here 3 times and still not seen a fraction of it. Yet we walked 20 Km in there. There should be some big vehicles in there but only found some tracks. But we found a lot of little things like old miner boot with real nails in the soles,a small horse shoe and imprints of horseshoe's and miner boots. From some places it took more 1.5 Hr just to get to the only entry. And unfortunately at the last visit we saw that effort are been made to seal the entry up. A big wire mesh was placed, a wheelbarrow and some mounting materials were present there but no workers. I think it was raining to hard that day.. Probably the entry is closed now. But sure fun to explore there an been off the grid for some hours. IMG_9504 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_9497 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_9489 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_9480 by Bart Hamradio, on Flick IMG_1291 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_1300 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_1304 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_1317 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_1321 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_1325 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_1327 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_0679 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_0687 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_0689 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_9499 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
  10. This one was visited on my latest trip through Germany. This was the water treatment facility of a power plant. That power plant is already gone. There were also some outdoor water basins ,but they were well overgrown. The only thing I took from this facility were several mosquito's bites. IMG_0345-bewerkt by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_0337 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_0376 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_0366-HDR by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_0408 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_0394 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_0364-bewerkt-bewerkt by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
  11. History The engineering company J.E. Billups of Cardiff who also constructed Mireystock Bridge and the masonry work on the Lydbrook viaduct commenced construction of the tunnel in 1872 using forest stone. The tunnel is 221 metres in length and took 2 years to construct. The tunnel allowed the connection of the Severn and Wye Valley railway running from Lydney with the Ross and Monmouth network at Lydbrook. The first mineral train passed through the tunnel on 16 August 1874. Passenger services commenced in September 1875 pulled by the engine Robin Hood. The history of this section of line is not without incident - a railway ganger was killed in the tunnel by a train in 1893 and a locomotive was derailed by a fallen block of stone in the cutting at the northern entrance in 1898. The line officially closed to passenger trains in July 1929 but goods trains continued to use the line until the closure of Arthur & Edward Colliery at Waterloo in 1959 and Cannop Colliery in 1960. Lifting of the track was completed in 1962. The tunnel and cutting were buried with spoil in the early 1970's. Thanks to the vision and enthusiasm of a group of local Forest railway enthusiasts assisted by Forest Enterprise the top of the northern portal of the tunnel (with its unusual elliptical shape) which has lain buried for 30 years has now been exposed. As of 2018 the tunnel now still lays abandoned with no sign of the cycle track and the £50,000 funding seemingly gone to waste. Pics Thanks for looking
  12. Chateau Sarco – France Built in the 19th century. Once owned by the ministry and sold in 2008 for just under 4 Million euro and abandoned ever since……
  13. I was passing here today on way home from work so called in to have a look ...Quite a nice little explore ☺️
  14. I first had a look at this spot in 2015. Almost three years on the place has been knocked about a bit and it seemed stripped somehow from the last visit. Did not spend that long in here. As I parked up an old lady drove passed paying more attention to the my car than I liked, so I blasted round in about twenty minutes ☺️ When I came out an old chap drove passed again paying a lot of attention to myself and the car. Country Watch in full swing ☺️ Nice to see the place again but, it did appear to have lost something over the three years. Thanks for Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157669030838798/with/28272201358/
  15. Visited this one with @AndyK! and @darbians as the first real stop on a big week-long derp bonanza of some sort, after two fails the day before this (after a 12+ hour drive). We had checked it out the night before, without much luck, so as it was getting late, and we were all suffering massive sleep deprivation, we decided to turn in for the night. But before leaving town in the morning for the next few stops, we decided to have another try with the help of daylight, and it sure paid off. I can't find a lot of history on this place, it seems to be quite the 'ghost' online, but it does boast some pretty epic vintage machines. What's interesting here is that it is all preserved so well, yet there are no signs of potential conversion into event space or something similar, which is something that happens a lot with these kinds of places. Photos - Cheers 😎
  16. This is inside of a factory that was once used for producing the somewhat famous Pandur-Tanks. This area of the factory closed sometime in 2015/16, with first signs showing as early as 2010. At first the company decided to restructure by stopping production and only using the plant at this location for tank maintenance, service and repair. When this decision was finalized about 60% of employees were dismissed. Reasoning - there wasn't enough demand for new vehicles. In late 2016 the police was called to a so called "illegal rave" that was held in one of the former production halls. Tens of thousands of euros in equipment were left behind. full story 50+ pics DSC_5646 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6939 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_5665 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_5724 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_5739 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6707 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6743_1 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6812 by anthrax, auf Flickr
  17. Had a look at this place on a recent trip to Scotland. Very decayed and stripped this one but never the less still a nice spot for a look around. There was some lovely tiles still in place in parts of the hospital which I liked. I do like a bit of old tile work There was a lot of kids toys dotted about also which seemed strange and out of place. We almost bumped into a couple of people who turned up while we where there but, they must have heard us inside and ran off. Maybe they had mistaken our low talking for the rustle of feathers A nice relaxed explore this, for us anyway, on a nice sunny afternoon. Visited with non member Paul. Thanks for Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157694792372572/with/41878484015/
  18. Engedi Welsh Calvinistic Methodist Chapel built was built in 1842, rebuilt in 1867 and modified in 1890. The present chapel, dated 1867, is built in the Classical style of the gable entry type, to the design of architect Richard Owen of Liverpool by Evan Jones of Dolyd and cost £4579. The Classical front is of granite masonry with Penmon stone dressings and a portico. The chapel is now Grade II listed. The interior contains an octagonal pulpit and an ornate organ with classical detailing including Corinthian pilasters and swags. The raked galley is on three sides and is supported by cast iron columns with brackets and foliate capitals. The ceiling consists of 15 square panels, again very heavily decorated with classical mouldings and with ornate roses to the centre of each providing ventilation and fittings for lights. The basement has a ministers room, offices and a schoolroom. The chapel was sold at auction in April 2014 for £45,000 after having been disused for a number of years. At this time it remains disused and in a state of disrepair. One thing Wales has in abundance is abandoned chapels. They're not my kind of thing especially but as chapels go this is a pretty decent one. Andy K found this a couple of years ago and amazingly it hasn't changed a lot bar some extra pigeons and their wicked ways. Visited again with @Andy & @Miss.Anthrope. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Diolch am edrych eto
  19. Chateau Marianne / Chateau Alchimiste History Not much history on this location but it was rumoured to be have been once occupied by a former professor. The chateau is located in a small, rural town in France. The town's residents have halved in the last 40 years and it was beginning to look quite run down. I can imagine the nickname 'Alchimiste' (which means Alchemist in French) came from all the chemistry equipment left behind such as: test tubes, syringes, bottles, cylinders and beakers. It seems the previous inhabitant was also a bit of an artist, we found many paintings scattered around the house and a large collection in the attic, as well as a small studio in an upstairs room. Visit I visited this beautiful chateau on a euro trip with @PROJ3CTM4YH3M. We went the previous night to check to see if it was accessible and boy we were in for a shock! Neither of us realised how much stuff had been left and how interesting the contents were. We both particularly liked the framed butterfly collection which was hung up in one of the living rooms, as it reminded us of the film 'Silence of the Lambs.' After a short investigation we decided to return the following day and booked a hotel in a nearby town. Arriving the next morning once sun had risen, the place was really brought into it's element. So, as always, hope you enjoy my photos! If you've got this far, thanks for reading
  20. History In 1781 the town of Montrose was unique among Scottish towns and cities in being the first to have an asylum for the insane. The Montrose Lunatic Asylum, Infirmary and Dispensary was completed after the institution of a subscription by local woman Mrs Susan Carnegie of Charleton, following concerns about "mad people being kept in a prison in the middle of the street". It was described as "a house and garden in the links of Montrose". It occupied the site now bounded by Barrack Road, Ferry Road and Garrison Road, approximately where the Marine Hotel and the Fire Station now stand. During these years, the main preoccupation of the managers was the considerable overcrowding in the Asylum, which among other things, made containing the not infrequent outbreaks of such diseases as cholera and smallpox very difficult. By 1853, the number of residents passed the 200 mark. As before, various additions and alterations were made to the buildings, but at one stage, even the Medical Superintendent's house on its completion was pressed into service as patient accommodation before the Superintendent could move in! Thus, inevitably, a committee was appointed in 1855 to look into the question of acquiring a site for a new Asylum, and finally decided on the lands of the farm of Sunnyside, outside the town. In 1858, Dr. James Howden was appointed Superintendent and was to remain in this post for the next 40 years. The first patients were received in the new Asylum during that year, and within two years, "the greater part of the patients were moved" to it. Inevitably, with the increased availability of accommodation, the stringent requirements for admission exercised at the old Asylum were relaxed, and in a single year (1860) the numbers rose by 30% to 373. Carnegie house, for private patients opened in 1899. A brochure describing its attractions and a brief history of the Hospital was commissioned by the Managers to mark the occasion, and was written by Mr. James Ross. A copy can be seen in Montrose Public Library. Ravenswood was now given up, but Carnegie House did not solve the continuing problems of overcrowding. Numbers reached 670 by 1900, and two "detached villas" were built in quick succession, Howden Villa being completed in 1901 and Northesk Villa in 1904. With the crisis in Europe in 1938, arrangements were made for gas proofing and sandbagging basement windows. One hundred yards of trench, 6 feet deep were dug in the field opposite the main gate. A.R.P. training was started, fire fighting appartus was overhauled, and gas masks issued. All this effort was not wasted. On the 2nd of October, 1940, five high explosive bombs fell on the Hospital. One missed the Main Building by 12 feet, breaking glass, but causing no casualties. Another hit the kitchen area of Northesk Villa, injuring two nurses. One of them, Nurse Reid, although injured herself, managed to attend to her colleague, Nurse Simpson, and then "proceeded to comfort and calm her patients". Her devotion to duty was such that Nurse Reid was recommended for a decoration, and was awarded the George Medal, the first in Scotland. As in the previous war, patients were evacuated from other Hospitals which were required by the War Office, and Montrose had once again to accommodate as many as 220 additional patients and their staff from Stirling. At a later stage, patients from Aberdeen were also accommodated, due to bomb damage at Aberdeen Asylum. The number of resident patients thus topped one thousand for the first and only time, (1052 on 12th June, 1940). Over the 30 year period from post-war to the bi-centenary, it would not be too much of an exaggeration to say that the hospital had changed as much as it did in the previous hundred. Television was introduced in time for the Coronation in 1953, and most wards had a set by 1957. Complete modernisation of most wards was carried out during the 50's and 60's, which transformed especially the Main Building wards. Open fires gave way to radiators and many side rooms were heated for the first time. The site officially closed in 2011. The explore Yet another site long overdue, so with a few clear days it was time to make the long journey north. After a few years of average asylums, Sunnyside was a very pleasant way to spend an afternoon with the North Sea winds at ease! With soil samples being taken in the grounds, hopefully the site has a future; which wont be helped by a group of kids i encountered later in the day. I cringe at the thought that one fire could bring 230 years of history to an end... 1. 2. Waiting for the tourist bus... 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Doctor's changing room. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14, 15. 16, 17. 18, 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. One from the modern(ish) villa, probably 1930's built. 24. Basement view of the main building with day room and 'cells' beyond, long used for storage. 25. 26. Infirmary. 27. Interesting club house with maintenance shed attached. Note the tree timbers supporting the porch. Thanks for looking folks!
  21. One of my favorites from my first Italy trip. For a industry freak like me it can't get any better then this. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
  22. Premier inn Manchester Visited with @GK-WAX and @vulex we was after a little get together so decided on a nice relaxed evening chilling on the Manchester skyline. After a very hot day was good to unwind and take in Liverpool he view and watch the world go by below us. DSC_3169 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3172 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3175 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3165 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3152 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3150 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3134 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3117 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3187 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3184 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3183 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3180 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3182 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3121 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3135 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3138 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3148 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3153 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3157 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3161 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3162 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3164 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3176 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  23. Bowling World – Belgium Closed in late 2015. It closed due to a decline in custom and proposed development on the site of this bowling alley and dance hall next door.
  24. La Morgue Prelude is situated on a massive hospital site. The hospital originally opened in the 1860’s, the hospital itself is still in use today but large parts of it is unused and getting renovated.
  25. The present chateau style house, the third on the site, was built for the Hughes copper mining family. The house, designed in the 1870s, was called a 'calendar house' as it had 365 rooms. It is set in walled gardens of around 18 acres, which are themselves set in grounds of around 5,000 acres, encompassing open fields, parkland and forests. The 1870s structure is an example of the myriad of new types of buildings that were arising during the Victorian era to fulfil increasingly specialised functions. For example, there was a room in the mansion that was only to be used for the ironing of newspapers, so that the ink would not come off on the reader's hands. The property was last used as a private home in 1929, after which it was converted to a 'rheuma spa', a health centre for the treatment of people with rheumatism. The spa remained until the outbreak of World War II, when the hall was taken over as a hospital. Post-war the hall became Clarendon Girls' School, but after extensive fire damage in 1975, the school was forced to close. Restored by businessman Eddie Vince as a Christian conference centre, it was sold at auction in 2001, but a proposed redevelopment by Derbyshire Investments failed to materialise. The property was to be offered for sale by auction on 12 October 2011 with a reserve price of £1.5million which did not include the 5,000 acres of surrounding land. However it was bought shortly before auction by a businessman who bid closest to the £1.5m guide price. He intended to develop the property into a hotel, but these plans never materialised, and the property lies derelict. In 2015 Kinmel Hall was identified by the Victorian Society as one of the top ten at-risk Victorian and Edwardian buildings. This has popped up a few times over the last few years and amazingly nothing much has changed since the last report in 2016. I failed here a couple of years back so it was time for round 2 with @Andy& @Miss.Anthrope. We don't take Ls baby! Renovation work appears to be taking place so there are definitely people working here during the week. The ground floor is where all the good stuff is at. Upstairs everything is pretty much stripped and empty. Anyway, I'm glad to have finally made it in here. Definitely one of the best mansions in the UK. Cheers for looking
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