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  1. Some of you may have already seen this one. This is a nice paper mill closed down almost a decade ago. There are many photos of this place when it was still active, and some of them were taken when the factory had been occupied by workers right after the closure... It's a rather good place still today, despite the amount of copper thieves who came here. There are still some interesting things such as the power station (probably the best part), the semi-active substation, some laboratories and archives... We also found a small container where a radioactive substance called thorium nitrate used to be stored. You can look at all my photos here: https://flic.kr/s/aHskQESLot
  2. This was the second of two places we looked at, and was one of those 'we probably won't get into this one' places. It's always a bonus when you're pretty much convinced you wont get in then turn up & end up getting in 😀 The place was covered with mushrooms (Jews Ear apparently) and mould has taken it's hold on the place, by the time i got to the second floor started to feel a bit queasy breathing it all in, reminded me to get some masks for next time. A pretty cool place, with plenty to see and a variety of 'funky' lampshades... Started losing daylight by the time we reached the 3rd floor so the pics started to get gradually worse. History Not sure exactly when it opened but it was up & running in the 1930's. In it's day it stood on it's own extensive grounds over 3 acres. The greater portion of this was devoted to sun bathing and recreational lawns. The remainder was largely a kitchen garden which provided fresh garden produce to the tables. Quote from its promotional literature "The views from the bedrooms are delightful. Those on the front and on one side have an open outlook over the sea, the others overlook the golf links and the open country. Your views are in every room open, nothing shuts in any part of BRADDA PRIVATE HOTEL. 'BRADDA' has been entirely redesigned, enlarged, redecorated and refurnished, and is now one of the most beautiful hotels in the Island" Unsure exactly when it closed but from what i can tell it was around 2015. A proposal to demolish the dilapidated hotel and erect a residential care home, along with car parking, access and highway alterations, was submitted by Spaldrick Care Ltd in September last year. The developer estimated construction of the home would cost £5 million and create 60 full-time jobs. Around thirty families objected to the plans, as well as Port Erin Commissioners and the government's planning committee. Concerns were raised over the scale of the development, its impact on views, privacy, traffic and parking, as well as its conformity with both the Southern Area Plan, and the all-Island Strategic Plan. The plans were initially overruled by the Department of Environment, Food and Agriculture. However following a successful appeal by the developer this year, and on the recommendation of the planning inspector, the plans got the green-light. some of the lampshades some of the lovely mold & decay the place had to offer
  3. So this place has nothing now but memories and juvenile grafitti The Witch Ball Inn was popular with the army guys in the 1940s, due to its proximity to Prees Heath airfield. In particular the Americans stationed there took a special liking to it. And yet after that there's very little on the place. It boasted an impressive function room and a now filled-in swimming pool, At some point in the 1980s the building came under new ownership and the name changed to The Cherry Tree Hotel. The swimming pool was actually converted into a fish pond, and a fountain was installed in the bar area. The pub was visited by Michael Cain whenever he was in the area visiting his daughter. it closed down, around 2005 was boarded up and then was consequentially plundered and trashed.
  4. Fantastic Fireplaces and where to find them A complex of a bungalow; stables and former jockey's cottages one of which is still occupied when I opened the door and found the elderly resident eating his lunch!!! Exit stage right
  5. First report on here, or anywhere, in ages hope you all enjoy it. Been wanting to see inside this place for years, had a failed attempt a few years back but a recent fire and the property being bought last year worked to our advantage. Visited with my partner who has also tried & been caught by security so we were both pleased to gain access & finally get to have a look around the place. A bit of a shell in parts due to the fire & school holidays but still plenty to see & well wort the effort ☺️ History, stolen from www.culturevannin.im In 1892 the Liverpool Marine Biological Committee set up a base in two small buildings on Port Erin Bay; much of their work involved dredging excursions in the Irish Sea. The growing numbers of visiting naturalists and vacation classes began to ‘swamp’ these small buildings and in 1902 activities were relocated to bigger premises in the south-west corner of Port Erin Bay. In 1919 the University of Liverpool took control and ownership of the Marine Biological Station, and students studied Marine Biology there for a number of years. The last admission of students from the University of Liverpool was in Autumn 2005. The station closed in October 2006. The building fell victim to an arson attack on New Years Eve 2016 😠 The propery has been bought for £500,000 by Delgatie Ltd in 2018, which plan to replace the existing buildings with a mixed use development including residential, retail and commercial.
  6. Afternoon, Thought id upload a report from my visit to Wales in jan just gone. It was a freezing cold day and we had left early hours to get there before the rest of the tourbus turned up Heres some history from googles... The population of Cardiff had expanded greatly, from under 20,000 in 1851 to over 40,000 less than 20 years later. By 1890 there were 476 Cardiff residents "boarded out" in the Glamorgan Asylum, and a further 500 to 600 being held in hospitals as far away as Chester and Carmarthen.[2] Costing £350,000 and ten years to build, the Cardiff City Asylum opened on 15 April 1908. The main hospital building covered 5 acres (2.0 ha), designed to accommodate 750 patients across 10 wards, 5 each for men and women. Like many Victorian institutes, it was designed as a self-contained institute, with its own 150 feet (46 m) water tower atop a power house containing two Belliss and Morcom steam-engine powered electric generator sets, which were only removed from standby in the mid-1980s. The site also contained a farm, which provided both food supplies and therapeutic work for the patients.[2] The first medical superintendent was Dr Edwin Goodhall, whose then advanced approaches and therapies resulted in the hospital acquiring a reputation at the forefront of mental health care. Patients were also encouraged to take work and supervised tours outside the institute.[2] During the First World War, the facility was called the Welsh Metropolitan War Hospital.[3]During the Second World War, part of the hospital was turned over to the military, becoming the largest emergency service hospital in South Wales, treating British, American and German personnel. 200 beds were retained for civilian use, which enabled early treatment of post traumatic stress disorder of military patients.[2] On 5 July 1948, the hospital was taken over by the Ministry of Health as the National Health Service came into existence. After the introduction of Care in the Community in the early 1980s the hospital went into a period of decline and the number of resident patients reduced.[2] In November 2010 the Cardiff and Vale University Health Board decided that it was preferable to centralise all adult mental health care services at Llandough.[4] The hospital finally closed its doors in April 2016.[5][6] We had gotten in very easily and during our 6 hours or so there, did come across some other explorers, who had told us they had seen security walking around outside, however, we didnt see anyone at all, even from the top of the water tower we couldnt see anyone, happy days. I have heard of people getting caught here again recently though... On to some pics Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by [url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Whitchurch Hospital by [url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Thanks for looking DJ
  7. A mish mash of an industrial estate; a few empty units; big spiders old documents and lazy security
  8. Sometimes I love my satnav today it took me a new route to the local cider farm rubber necking as i go along i spy a rather dilpidated chimney stack through the trees have a mooch? well it would be rude not to Built in 1812 thats all I know some nice stuff AND it is untouched by kids or taggers maybe I took its urbex virginity? lol
  9. Pendleton House salford very easy to get into not much to see not much to add to previous postings
  10. The Italians don't mess around when it comes to architecture and this old sanatorium is no exception. Built in 1924 in an art deco style, it began life as a tuberculosis hospital before being converted into a generic hospital in the 1950s. In 2015 it closed down to make way for a new hospital. Most of it has been completely emptied now but the admin building and chapel are stunning regardless. The vast network of tunnels are pretty epic as well with workshops, locker rooms and some odd looking stretchers amongst other things down there. They connect every single building in the complex so you can access certain buildings that are sealed from outside. It's a big old place with a lot to see. I've been twice and still not seen it all. Wards Tunnels Admin Block The Chapel Thanks for looking
  11. The hospital first opened in October 1889 as the Free Hospital for Women and Children. In 1903 children ceased to be treated and in 1904 it became the Samaritan Free Hospital for Women. It had 88 beds in two sections; the surgical side with 11 wards of two beds each and 3 larger convalescent wards, and the medical side with 5 wards and a smaller one used as a theatre. By the beginning of the 20th century the Samaritan Free Hospital, despite its small size, had become one of the country's most important gynaecological hospitals. During WW2 the Hospital joined the Emergency Medical Service with 103 beds. In 1948 the Hospital joined the National Health Service, becoming affiliated with St Mary's Hospital. It was renamed the Samaritan Hospital for Women and served under the NHS until its closure in 1997. Abandoned for over twenty years and with a lush exterior it's a shame there isn't more to see in here but it's still pretty interesting. A nice tiled staircase is the only redeeming architectural feature but it's nice enough to give the building some charm. The canteen is still recognisable but most rooms have been cleared out. The most interesting artefacts are down in the basement. There is a box of what are presumably human bones that was hidden in a forgotten incineration bag. A spinal column casually sitting on a shelf in the stationary room, and paperwork dating back as far as the 1930s. Worth mentioning that it is completely riddled with exposed asbestos piping down there. Do we care? Nah. Probably should though! Thanks for looking
  12. Originally the Sea View Hotel, Cautley House is in every way as bland and and tacky as I expected. Built in 1888, it was extended to the east in 1906, became the Seabrook Hotel in the 1960s, Alfred’s Hotel in the 1980s and then a christian healing centre in around 1994. A care home was next on the agenda once the healing centre closed in 2011/12, it didn’t happen though as the building needed updating and was deemed unfit for such use. So it’s just sat empty since, although there used to be a live-in guardian person, but with the disuse and the decay commencing over a number of years they left too. Now plans are in for demolition it’s days as any kind of establishment are numbered, probably to be replaced by the non-affordable homes that keep springing up round here. And despite being accessible in some way or another most of that time it’s pretty untrashed apart from naturally falling apart. Some history and old pics here Entrance/reception area/groud floor rooms Later extension housing the dance floor and DJ booth/sacrificial altar with added air con Main stairs up to the locally-named suites All the rooms were equally as meh, so much shades of beige in this place with 70s style avocado bathroom suites too. And balcony cat-flaps. The most fucked part was the 1906 extension Some signage and stuff There you have it, worth an hour or so if you're in the area
  13. After seeing Mookster's report of this site a couple of weeks ago; and it being fairly local, I decided I would check it out on my days off work. A friend of mine on Facebook whom I know through other hobbies had expressed interest in an explore with me the day before I had planned to go; so we decided that I would pick him up in the morning and we would go for the hour drive to the location. It was nice to put another face to a name who I'd spoken to for quite some time. The weather that morning had been pretty bad through and through and was forecast to only get worse, but thankfully the rain stopped; and we had a reasonable few hours of weather as we went inside the Abattoir. I had mixed feelings overall about going into the site, nothing eerie or spooky of course, I'm not a YouTuber; but of the side of meat consumption which I always try to forget about. It was pretty cold inside as expected and clinical. I'm not sure I would have wanted to work here. The site is very big and took quite a few hours to do. It was largely trashed and stripped, but the offices really redeemed the devastation downstairs and were stuffed full of things to pick and rifle through. After a very pleasant explore, we walked through the abandoned Garden Centre next door back to my car and stopped off for lunch at a Buddies USA Diner near the M1. Those of you who know me, will know what a carnivore I am, and though I wasn't particularly freaked out by the Abattoir; I certainly had a funny feeling going round in the back of my mind while eating my tasty Philly Cheese Steak Sandwich. Anglo Beef Processors, (ABP) is one of the largest meat processing companies in Europe. During the mid-2000s, production was scaled back and this site and the similar but much smaller facility in Bathgate, Scotland were closed. The facility opened under ownership of Meade Buswell in the 1960s and became Buswells of Blisworth. After a takeover in the 1970s, it became Dalgety Buswell. Later on, it came under the Anglo Beef Processors umbrella before it closure in 2004. Olleco, a cooking oil collection and recycling company operate out of a directly adjacent facility and are an associated company to ABP, which makes sense really as the facility was full of discarded oil drums, catering containers and other plastic barrels. The site was a maze of walk in fridges and freezers, and it was quite easy to get lost in them while navigating your way around. Strangely, and luckily, the site was devoid largely of crappy tags, but the natives had inevitably had their way with some of the things inside! #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21 #22 #23 #24 #25 #26 As always guys, thanks for taking the time to read. More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157706479202211
  14. I discovered this big factory almost 2 years ago. It used to build washing machines and it was closed down more than 10 years ago. At that time it was already obvious that the location was completely empty... but what made me really interested in this place was the colour of some building of the complex: that very particular red, which almost seems like blood, was enough to make me say "I need to go there". And so I did. As I guessed, there was nothing inside lol, but I don't regret this exploration at all... Btw this place is a little bit tricky because it's completely surrounded by houses, so everyone can see you. We had to hide in various occasion: one time there was a watch dog who was barking to us from his home so we hid ourselves behind a wall, just 2 meters away from it. Luckily its owners didn't get why that dog was barking that much. At some point an old lady and her husband saw us but in the end nothing happened... Here is the complete album: https://flic.kr/s/aHskSXJdtA
  15. Hi all! Not sure on the history of this place but its been around a while. Not a bad place. Not that exciting but we were passing so thought we would have a mooch! A couple of nice cars.
  16. So a few weeks ago, myself and two other explorers; @albino-jay and @ Ferret whom I've known online for many years, but never managed to explore with! We all get round to exploring with one another eventually! This site was previously owned by a firm who were contracted to develop technology for the military, but was eventually sold off to a property developer after its 2011 closure. The site has recently become the Urbex Hotspot for people, so it was good to get it done and dusted before it got too much worse. We really enjoyed ourselves, and despite being fairly stripped out, there was a lot to see here. We spent around 10 hours on site I think!!! Once again, we bumped into about 4 other groups of explorers. I guess this is becoming a thing nowadays in this hobby to be honest! Just gotta face the facts that it is now mainstream... The Royal Radar Establishment; a former Research Centre in Malvern, Worcestershire in the United Kingdom was formed in 1953 as the Radar Research Establishment by the merger of the Air Ministry's Telecommunications Research Establishment (TRE) and the British Army's Radar Research and Development Establishment (RRDE). It new name was given after a visit by Queen Elizabeth II in 1957. Both names were later abbreviated to RRE. In 1976 the Signals Research and Development Establishment (SRDE), involved in communications research, joined the RRE to form the Royal Signals and Radar Establishment (RSRE). They had been closely associated since before the beginning of World War II, when the predecessor to RRDE was formed as a small group within the Air Ministry's research center in Bawdsey Manor. They were soon forced to leave Bawdsey due to its exposed location on the east coast of England. After several moves, the groups finally settled in separate locations in Malvern beginning in May 1942 with a merger in 1953 that formed the RRE and renamed these as the North Site (RRDE) and the South Site (TRE). In 1991 they were partially privatize, and became Defence Evaluation and Research Agency in 1996. The North Site was closed in 2003 and the work was consolidated at the South Site, while the former North Site was sold off for housing developments. The RSRE is now part of Qinetiq. Some of the most important technologies developed from work at RSRE are radar, thermography, liquid crystal displays and speech synthesis. Contributions to computer science made by the RSRE included ALGOL 68RS (a portable implementation of ALGOL 68, following on from ALGOL 68R developed by RRE), Coral 66, radial basis function networks, hierarchical self-organising networks (deep autoencoders), the VIPER high-integrity microprocessor, the ELLA hardware description language, and the TenDRA C/C++ compiler. The RSRE motto was Ubique Sentio, which is Latin for "I sense everywhere". The site is well explored after its sale to a Private Developer. It is well worth visiting with its mockup of a RADAR Bunker. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21 #22 #23 #24 #25 #26 #27 #28 #29 #30 #31 #32 #33 #34 #35 #36 #37 #38 #39 #40 Thanks for Looking More at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157704376480512/page1 This was a busy one, so you will have to exit via the Gift Shop I'm afraid!
  17. I have decided not to name this one; it sits in the middle of a large Brand New Housing Estate in a rather affluent part of the UK, not far from London. The reason behind this is because it looks as if its either being converted or used for storage; and tbh I don't think it needs hundreds of people going to it; its situated in the grounds of the Site Office. The Church was part of a huge Convent which I didn't even know existed; and was locally derelict for many, many years, completely unbeknownst to me! It was last used as a church when the complex closed in 2006. Visited with a Non-Explorer friend. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12
  18. A explore of an old slate mine. The mining started a few hundred years ago but is abandoned for several decades. This mine is not the safest and some parts are already collapsed. All the train rails are gone but you can see where they were. Only some bats live in these parts now. The white dots on the walls are all dead spiders with a layer of calcium. Not sure why there were so much dead spiders there. The person with whom I exploring with had done the research of this mine. You had to walk some distance through the woods to get to the entrance. . There was yet another level but we couldn't make a safe connection point for a rope so we skipped that. It was a steep incline 10 meters down. 1 all the white dots are dead spiders. IMG_3796 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 2 left or right IMG_3824 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 3 IMG_3820 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 4 going down IMG_3813 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 5 triangle corridor IMG_3801 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 6 accidents are bound to happen.... IMG_3810 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 7 a steep incline IMG_3803 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 8 more inclines IMG_3792-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
  19. Visited as the second site on mine and @Mooksters first Northern Road Trip of the year. We had failed several sites that day, and the day was coming to a rather murky and rainy end; but before we plumbed the hotel in for the night; we went to this short, sweet and rather destroyed church; the lone survivor of its time, sitting on its lonesome behind a Costa Coffee Drive Through and opposite a Travelodge Hotel. As we did a quick shoot of the inside; we could hear afternoon shoppers stopping by for their takeout coffee and cake fix making their orders over the drive through intercom. We even enjoyed a couple of cold drinks inside the shop after we came out of the church right next door! The building was put to tender in March 1869 with the stone-laying ceremony taking place on 21st July. The church, provided 550 sittings at a cost of £4,167 and was built of stone from the local Crosland Hill quarries. Initially the Clerk of Works was Mr Jonathan Parsons;subsequently succeeded by Mr Phillips. Consecration took place on 10th August 1880. The church was built by a local architect and protected by local laws from demolition and has remained empty since 2004 #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157679116734258/with/40308289993/
  20. have passed this often and today thought lets have a look; it is a former station masters house on the hawarden Loop; a once thriving goods and passenger depot Well that was a waste of 15 mins I must say!!! still here is my wonderous adventure
  21. 大家好! My oh my, how long has it been since I posted a report? Exploring has become a low priority for me ever since I left the UK, even if I've always kept tabs on new sites shared here and on social media. Truth be told learning Mandarin and my lady have taken a much bigger priority in recent years, plus my lady is no fan of me going about it alone so that makes organising jaunts more challenging. I have visited a fair few sites around Taiwan, but compared to Europe there is so little here to get me to jump on the next train there because beautiful architecture is just so rare and even noteworthy industrial sites are few and far between; many places are just rotting concrete shells. So this report here is meant to be a compilation of my latest explores to date which I feel don't have enough bite to warrant standalone reports. There will be more reports to come in the future, but since I left my torch and tripod in England it will be some time before I visit these. I trust the results will not be disappointing though. 亞哥花園/Encore Garden, July 2018 Visited with some colleagues and non-explorers. I'd always been aware of this one, as it's situated close to my favourite hiking trails just outside of Taizhong where I live. But being me I never made a move until last year. It's an abandoned theme park in Dakeng district, opened in 1981 and was a hugely popular site that attracted around 1m people a year. Like several sites in Taiwan it was hit by the 921 earthquake in 1999 which severely damaged the area, causing attendance to drop dramatically. Eventually the financial losses incurred forced the place to close in 2008. On most days there is a security guard with dogs at the top of the site, living in a shack. However as of last year the entire site has been repurposed as a rally racetrack. Pay $100 (that's £2.50) to enter and you can sit back and spectate, but before that we chose to explore the park first. Initially we were in full stealth mode, when we spotted people in hi vis vests dotted around the site as well as the guard's dogs barking at us, but after seeing others drive round with their scooters we realised it was a free for all for today. What I found really fascinating about exploring in Taiwan compared to Europe and other places is how the fertile, humid tropical enviroment is far more hostile to built structures which means nature takes over rapidly once the place is abandoned; the restaurant was completely covered in thick, thick dust, and other structures had started to be completely invaded by tree branches. Old arcade machines left behind Because of thick shrub finding the entrance to this ride took a bit of careful searching, but we got to it. It turns out as long as we stayed off the roads as much as possible, we were at free to roam whenever we wanted. The racing stewards didn't mind us at all. Unfortunately the outdoor auditorium was inaccessible because there were too many race cars on the route leading up to it. Another thing that's incredibly striking about Taiwan and nature is the frequency of earthquake tremors. In my experience they seem to hit every few months, and in mountainous and rural areas can trigger minor (or major) landslides; look at the next 2 pictures and compare to older photos... By stark contrast to the western world, obviously with a few exceptions Asians and the Taiwanese have utmost respect for abandoned sites. Whether this be rooted in a fear of the supernatural (people in the west believe in ghosts, but superstitions are taken far more seriously here), they treat abandoned sites as tombs and relics of the past to be treated with respect. It's because of this, little if any effort is made to seal any buildings from intruders and yet sites see so little vandalism. Security guards are rare, too. Another thing is that for several sites upon closure and abandonment the owners do not bother to remove items from buildings, regardless of their value. The fundamental exception to this rule being statues and religious iconography, because to leave these to rot is to bring huge misfortune on one's life. So although decent sites are indeed rare, exploring those that are around are unique experiences in which you can really lose yourself and let your imagination run free. I then made my way inside the buildings in the middle of the site, and was stunned to find the power still on. It turns out even on a Sunday there were workers inside. Unfortunately the site manager walked in, then politely asked me to leave after this photo was taken. It's far from epic, but it's well worth sharing as it's so vastly different from Crapalot. I'm still alive by the way... Thank you so much for reading, and it's a real pleasure to be back. TBM x
  22. Didnt think I would bother doing LLuesty but nowt else to do was quite eerie with the rain and the wind though! Workhouse is well under way with development lots of builders on site and now probly not worth a look
  23. Solo jaunts. So after Chinese New Year there was yet another public holiday in Taiwan, and you know what that means? More exploring! This here is a compilation of different sites all well known to the exploring network, all very famous but compared to the general benchmark not enough to warrant standalone reports again. As I mentioned before, sometimes it's about scratching the itch just to get it off your mind rather than the drop-everything hit-the-road urge you get for some places. 台灣民俗村/Taiwan Folk Village Taiwan Folk Village was a mock-traditional park east of Huatan, near Zhanghua in the Bagua Mountain Scenic Area. Opened in 1993 it was a hugely successful site, a showcase of Taiwan traditional temples and aboriginal architecture (straw huts, temples and so forth) although if you ask me it all felt tacky with little historic value. That's the trouble with Taiwan; compared to Europe precious little remains of genuine, traditional architecture of dynasty's gone past. Not only that, I cannot understand what desire people have to turn such places into theme parks complete with swimming pools and rides rather than showcase the history. I digress. As with so many places in Taiwan, the 921 Earthquake meant a sharp drop in visitor numbers, pushing the operating company into the red, culminating in closure come 2012. It's in the backwaters of Taiwan with no public transport, so I had to begrudgingly take a taxi to get there. Unfortunately the taxi driver was oblivious to my intentions and dropped me off at the main gate, in full view of security. I get out, and there they are sat outside the cabin staring at me and wondering what I want to do. I don't want to ruin my chances and arouse suspicion, so I walked away as they watched. Awkward. I walk up the road and look for a way in, but there's a huge drop from the road down to the boundary fence. Getting in was a mission to say the least, having to find a safe spot to drop down and then find a suitable point to actually enter the site! I finally found one after considerable effort, then had to beat through thick bushes to get onto the roof of the main walls. A challenge, but I have an itch to scratch so I don't have a choice. Although I've lived in Taiwan for 2+ years, for those unfamiliar with Asian architecture the attention to detail in temples is beautiful; each aspect is unique. Unfortunately the interior was stripped and somewhat decayed with zero interest. The site is not fully abandoned, however. There are plenty of buddhist shrines and the mock-village buildings are still maintained by on-site staff. I saw a handful of scooters parked up around the site, and was certain there was someone lurking in places least expected so I had to be very careful. The biggest problem however was a dozen or so stray dogs who ran around in packs. Any sight of a foreigner liked myself triggered a chorus of barking, not out of hostility but perhaps curiosity and simply being an unexpected presence. Unfortunately this meant I had to move fast from building to building to avoid getting attention from security or caretakers. I tried to access the best part of the site, the beautiful mock-village quarters in the middle of the site, however to protect the shrines and interior these were completely locked up. At the northernmost part of the site was a large temple, which I managed to get inside however the interior was completely empty and lacking in interest. I was absolutely certain there was a caretaker lurking inside too, so only 2 shots. I went in search of the carousel and theme park attractions to the west of the site, however since the previous reports these have all been demolished. No loss, but that meant it was time to leave, so I headed back out and bade farewell. A derp for sure, but not a complete waste of time. Stay tuned for the rest. Love as always, TBM x
  24. History This coal mine was established in 1910 and was funded by the Prussian empire. This facility contained two elevator towers. In 1912 the construction began on a cokes plant right next to the coal mine. In 1943 the mine shut down due to the second world war, after 6 years the mine reopened again. With this reopening there was also a major renovation, with this renovation there was a larger modern elevator added to the facility. In 1998 the facility was bought by a big coal mining corporation which owned 5 other coal mines. In 2008 the 98 year old coal mining facility was closed down by the government. The historic part is currently being restored and the part that was renovated after the war will probably be torn down. Explore when we got in we first went trough a whole system with conveyer belts, after that we ended up in the huge coal washery. after we explored this part we went up into the elevator tower. The tower was 10 floors high so we were quite tired then we were on the tower but it was really worth it, in the tower there was an enormous electrical lift motor which was really nice to take pictures from. It was a really cool place to explore, I really enjoyed it! I also made a documentary about this place, the video is down below this post (it is in Dutch, but it has english subtitles) Here is the video i made on this place
  25. known to explorers by its nick name! Adwy Deg; the fair retreat Life was hard for Welsh hill farmers; the nearest road to this property is a mile away; The date of the turnpike road newly-constructed between 1777 and 1823 supports the suggestion that the settlement of this central area is principally late 18th century/early 19th century in date. Most of the farmsteads appear to date from this period, almost all of which lie to the west of (and below) the main road, boarded up with sadly time and thieves taking their toll not much left to see; but it was a great experience to spend an hour living in another's footprint on this earth; t seems the last occupant was a Miss Elizabeth Williams First entered into OS it seems between 1898-1908 The Certificate translated basically is for an exam achievement at Methodist ( Calvanist) Sunday School issued to Cadwaladr Williams class 2; 21st March 1902 For those not old enough to remember proper money; the 1960 receipt from the co-op approx equates to 30 players ciggies: 30p matches: 1p biro: 5p 1 oz golden virginia: 23p 3 gallons of petrol: 70p Happy Days !!!!!!!
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