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Found 146 results

  1. Chateau Marianne / Chateau Alchimiste History Not much history on this location but it was rumoured to be have been once occupied by a former professor. The chateau is located in a small, rural town in France. The town's residents have halved in the last 40 years and it was beginning to look quite run down. I can imagine the nickname 'Alchimiste' (which means Alchemist in French) came from all the chemistry equipment left behind such as: test tubes, syringes, bottles, cylinders and beakers. It seems the previous inhabitant was also a bit of an artist, we found many paintings scattered around the house and a large collection in the attic, as well as a small studio in an upstairs room. Visit I visited this beautiful chateau on a euro trip with @PROJ3CTM4YH3M. We went the previous night to check to see if it was accessible and boy we were in for a shock! Neither of us realised how much stuff had been left and how interesting the contents were. We both particularly liked the framed butterfly collection which was hung up in one of the living rooms, as it reminded us of the film 'Silence of the Lambs.' After a short investigation we decided to return the following day and booked a hotel in a nearby town. Arriving the next morning once sun had risen, the place was really brought into it's element. So, as always, hope you enjoy my photos! If you got this far, thanks for reading.
  2. One of a Kind Acoustic Places ! Never seen anything like this Fuel Storage of the NVA Troops in Germany
  3. need to add Japan in the flag section still
  4. Hi mates, I want to share with you the exploration of an abandoned mansion in Spain witha a 360º camera. Move your mouse to see whatever you want in the vid!
  5. Hi all I'm back again! Today we went and visited an old boarding school in Chichester. We did not know if the place was abandoned but we got a tip to say it "might" be abandoned. Well...we went to check out this place and my god it has got to be one of the better ones I've been to. No graffiti onsite but just an awesome explore all in all! HISTORY: The site itself originally started life as a boarding school and has a full range of classrooms, studios and offices. They had an onsite IT room which could fit up to 20 students at a time and also 2 large greenhouses for training in horticultural skills. The centre itself was very highly-regarded in the area and was built within the grounds of a grade II listed house. It went on to become a residential educational and training centre until the site officially closed its doors in 2011. Enjoy the video and if you really liked it feel free to subscribe to our channel!
  6. This is an old paper factory were they would make cardboard, The factory opened in 1905 and closed in 2005 after the company was taken over by an other company which stopped the production. There was also this old burned out Jaguar which was quite nice to photograph. Thanks for looking!
  7. Smudges 1st ever photographic report - may 2018 Smudges has been known by numerous other names over the years from The Crofters Arms Hotel to McGees to Moghuls Palace but has always retained it's charm and character. A true time capsule rotting away in the heart of Bolton. Featuring some stunning hand-carved bars and one of two of this type of revolving doors that exist the other located in a grand hotel in London. The Urban Collective We Film It... Thank you for checking out my pics guys! Clarky The Urban Collective We Film It...
  8. Hello JohnUrbex, Welcome to Oblivion State. Please feel free to browse around and get to know the others. If you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask. JohnUrbex joined on the 05/14/2018. View Member
  9. Smudges A.K.A The Crofters Arms Hotel and McGees first ever video report May 2018 The Urban Collective We Film It...
  10. Not the greatest photos ever, but yeah... mine are the after shots (shown first) and the before shots (shown after) are 25 years old and not mine. I hope that all makes sense
  11. Urban exploration in Japan is called Haikyo which is also the word "ruin" as far as i know. I ve made a few videos and i d like to share them here. please have a look and tell me what u think. PS: why is there no flag tag thingy for japan xD
  12. In 1960 Alfa Romeo grow out of their old factory located in Portello and started with the construction of a new plant located in Arese. This new plant had an Centro Stile (Design centre), Offices, Powerplant, Centro Technico (technical centre), and much more. Unfortunately in 2005 the whole factory closed after the last V6 Busso engine rolled out of the factory which made the once modern factory abandoned. In 2014 the factory was demolished to make place for a mall and parking spots, the only thing that still remain are the old technical centre and the design centre. In the summer of 2017 I was in the area so I decided to go and have a look at what remains of the factory. To my surprise there were still sections open and it had even had some papers and some car parts inside. Thanks for reading and I hoped you liked it!
  13. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. A former ballhaus somewhere in the eastern of Germany. At the moment they are renovating the building and for a small amount of money you can get acces for taking photographs.
  14. St Josephs Orphanage / Mount Street Hospital Even though this location has already been done by every man and his dog, I decided to chuck a quick report up anyway. As stated above in the title of my report, this one features photographs taken mostly on the first visit and one taken on another which will become clear towards the end. History St Joseph's Orphanage was designed by architect R.W Hughes in the style of gothic architecture, which was typical of that particular era. The construction work was endowed by Maria Holland, a wealthy widow, who contributed a sum of 10,000 to achieve this. She wanted to care for the sick, at a time when Preston had the highest mortality rate in the UK. This was predominately due to inadequate housing and the poor working conditions in the local mills and factories. The orphanage was first officially opened in the September of 1872 and five years later it became St Joseph's Institute for the Sick & Poor. The hospital accommodated for around 25 patients and was run by the Sisters of Charity of Our Lady Mother of Mercy. Voluntary contributions funded the maintenance and general upkeep of the hospital and it was also the first provider of welfare to Roman Catholic girls in Preston. In 1910 the hospital was granted its first operating theatre, as well as the chapel being built that same year. By 1933 a new wing was added and another in 1958 which was officiated by Princess Marina, the Duchess of Kent. During both world wars it served as a military hospital to treat wounded British and Dutch soldiers. One of St Joe's most famous patients was performer George Formby who died of a heart attack at the hospital in 1961. The hospital eventually closed its doors in 1982. It was then bought by its current owner who converted it into a care home until 2003. A year later in 2004, plans were proposed to convert the building into 82 flats with a grant of £2m but the redevelopement never seemed to happen. Presently 3 sections of the site are still classified as grade II listed and the building was recently featured on the Victorian Society's 'top most at risk historic buildings in the UK.' Visit Visited with @scrappy. This one has been on my to do list since I really started exploring but I never got round to doing it until recently. Despite being pretty fucked from years of neglect, local kids, general arseholes etc, I did still quite enjoy seeing this one finally. The main purpose of my visit was photographing a newly discovered section which certainly didn't disappoint, as well as the operating lights being rather pretty too (so glad no one has smashed those up yet.) All in all still a fairly nice location and worth popping by if you're in the area. As always, hope you enjoy my report! Started tidying up my photos of the chapel and went a little overboard... (Obligatory hospital wheelchair photo...) Now onto the best part Once we found out all the doors had been mysteriously removed we decided to go back again for more photos. If you've got this far, thanks for reading!
  15. Hi mates, few days ago mi brother and I visited a huge abandoned textile factory sorrounded by nature. Hope you enjoy!
  16. Campina Youth House Haven't seen this one posted anywhere so I decided to chuck a quick report up on it. I would say this particular location could be described as disused rather than abandoned, as it looked like there was redevelopment work going on when we arrived. Hence why it is so nice and pristine. Anyway, onto a little bit of history I found.. History The Youth House was orginally built as a leisure centre in Campina. A city situated roughly around the South East of Romania. It was constructed by local authorites in order to create a space for young people to participate in a range of sporting activities such as: aerobics, matrial arts and boxing. It was also established in order to promote culture and education and the house provided various facilities for the arts. The Youth House hosted a large auditorium to showcase fairs, exhibitions, conventions, concerts and festivals. Visit Visited with @darbians and Gina on a long weekend trip to Romania. We were driving past and saw what we orginally thought was a hotel and decided to check it out. Finding this place was defintely an unsuspected susprise and I'm very glad we decided to pull over. I really enjoyed photographing this one and I espiecally liked the mosiacs which reminded me of the ones at Buzludzha I had seen the previous year. I hope you enjoy my report! When you find a window open on the top floor, gotta get a few photos from the roof Thanks for reading!
  17. Villa Scorpio History Unfortunately I couldn't find a great deal of history surrounding this location but from what I have gathered it was built at some point during the late 19th century. The former occupier owned a large cement factory in the same town. I would imagine the family were quite well off, as it was very grand and exquisite building. The design of the villa shared various similarities with the Art Nouveau style of architecture. Featuring a stunning staircase, a beautiful skylight and an decorative greenhouse. Our visit Visited with @darbians and @vampiricsquid on our tour of Italy last summer. As soon as we arrived outside, we knew it was going to be a good explore. Hope you enjoy my photos! Externals Internals
  18. A stunning grade two listed gem decaying right on the high street. Featuring the stunning architecture of Alfred Waterhouse who also designed Strangeways prison the Manchester town hall. The main building has been used for many different purposes over the years as well as Prudential themselves. And the basement club was once a Berni inns restaurant (Cafe Monico) a chain that served a post-war British public such delight's as sherry schooners steak and chips and black forest gateau as well as becoming a dance club in the 90's. We had a wonderful two hours in this grade two listed time capsule. Hope you guys enjoy the pics as much as we enjoyed the explore. Thanks for any feedback The Urban Collective We Film It...
  19. Mineral Springs Bath House History The construction of the Mineral Springs Bath House began in 1907. This was in order to bring in more tourism and wealth into the area. The town it was built in was an excellent location to host a bath house, as it was well known for it's rich mineral water sources which was believed to have medicinal properties. During the start of the 20th century mineral baths were a very fashionable and popular leisure activity. It took 3 years to build, with the help of local residents and neighbouring villages. It was finally unveiled with a ceremony in 1911. The materials which were used for the interior were designed in Vienna, France and Belgium and it was the most expensive healing bath in Bulgaria at that current time. Typical to most bath houses, it was separated into two sections, one for the men and another for the women. Both areas accommodated for it's visitors with a large circular pool, changing rooms and 10 bathtubs. The baths also provided central heating facilities, the main parts of the building were kept consistently at 15°C, the changing rooms at 28°C and the baths themselves were 32°C. The bath house was also equip with a clinic, admin offices and a large laundry room. Sadly the Mineral Springs Baths eventually closed in 2001, due to the decline in interest and popularity along with the lack of investment by the local government. Visit As always, visited with @darbians on a long weekend trip to Bulgaria. We were both feeling pretty optimistic once we'd seen the grand looking exterior on arrival and fortunately the interior certainly lived up to our expectations. Externals Internals If you've got this far, thanks for reading
  20. Hi and happy new year! Here’s a short video of a recent explore of Healey Mills marshalling Yard and Dudfleet mill - thanks for watching!
  21. Visited on a freezing cold snowy Sunday morning with Scrappy NW and Katy. Long overdue visit this one but access isn't always possible. Inside its dark and decrepit yet enough remains to get an idea of how it looked when it was in full flow. The stage area was a no go as it has now collapsed. Structuraly it was fairly sound even in the upper areas. Things were made to last in 1894 obviously. Theatres have so much history and are always wonderful places to explore and photograph even if their condition is so poor. On with some history. I'm sure you have all read the history of this pace in other reports but i'll put a brief summary here: The Burnley Empire Theatre has a profoundly poignant history that starts in the 19th Century when it was first designed by GB Rawcliffe in 1894. Owned and managed by WC Horner, it was a theatre of high regard and continued to such following works in 1911, when the auditorium was redesigned by Bertie Crewe, well respected architect, much of whose work is no longer standing – pulled down to make way for housing, shops or other amenities, or victims of the war that destroyed so many beautiful buildings. The interior boasts ‘two slightly curved wide and deep balconies, terminating in superimposed stage boxes framed between massive Corinthian columns supporting a deep cornice. Segmental-arched proscenium, with richly decorated spandrels and heraldic cartouche. Side walls feature plaster panels, pilasters and drops. Flat, panelled ceiling with circular centre panel and central sun burner. Restrained heraldic and Greek plasterwork on balcony and box fronts’ . The Theatre opened on Monday the 29th of October 1894 with a variety show and could originally seat 1,935 people. During its time as a theatrical venue, Charlie Chaplin, Margot Fonteyn and Gracie Fields are just a few of the names to have appeared on the now broken stage. In 1938 The Theatre was converted for cinema use by the Architects Lewis and Company of Liverpool, and the seating capacity was reduced to 1,808 in the process. Like so many other Theatres around the Country the Empire was eventually converted for Bingo use in 1970 but even this ceased in 1995 and the Theatre, despite being a Grade II Listed building, has been empty ever since and is in serious decline, and listed as one of the Theatres Trust's buildings at risk. On with the pics
  22. Colonia IL / Mono Orphanage History The orphanage was built on the border of Switzerland and Italy. Sadly there doesn't seem to be a lot of information out there regarding this location. From what I've gathered it originally served as an orphanage and at some point in time, it was also used as a summer camp. Despite being closed during the 1970's, it has remained in pretty good condition with minimal graffiti and vandalism. Visit Visited again with @darbians and @vampiricsquid. Unfortunately when we visited the beds had been removed but lucky there was still a lot left to photograph. The chapel was absolutely stunning and it was nice to see that some furniture, including the desks from the classrooms were still there. All in all an excellent location to finish off our Italian adventure.
  23. In this video we are exploring an abandoned asylum which opened in 1930 and closed in 1997. I hope you liked the video!
  24. This is my first video of this 60s hotel located somewhere in Italy. I hope you liked the video!
  25. Hey, guys here's my video report on the #post-apocalyptic #Camelot #ThemePark. I've already made a photographic report with a full history etc so I won't bore you with that here as it is featured in the footage. Thanks for any feedback guys take it, easy man. PEACE The Urban Collective We Film It...
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