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Found 121 results

  1. This was an old explore from 2012 , the church and school closed in 1977 and Im not sure if its still empty or has been redeveloped
  2. This former school swimming pool was built in 1904 and abandoned in 1997. I happened upon it randomly and had a hunch that there might be a swimming pool inside but didn't expect much given the state of the exterior. Well, it turned out to be pretty decent inside. Clearly nobody has been inside here for a very long time. The pigeons have set up shop and went absolutely bonkers when they saw me. They've really done a number on the place, or should I say a number two? It's pretty minging to be honest but at least there's no shitty graffiti or vandalism. This was a night visit so I had to light paint all my shots. I didn't do too badly considering but it would be cool to see it in daylight. Hopefully someone else will have a look soon. This long curtain covered spectator seating for some reason The floor up here was well dodgy, you can just about see some holes on the left of shot Cheers for looking
  3. My first ever church,and was great to have a mooch about in her,lots of original features,and most important in my view not hit by lead thieves,and people who think its "cool"to trash things....hope it stays like this for years to come..a few picks why not... Thanks for looking...
  4. This is my first Urbex adventure. I recently moved to West Sussex and though I'd have a look around at some popular and easily accessible sites to explore. I stumbled upon Bedham Chapel and after some quick research, I found the location and travelled there. We drove down a single track road until spotted it in the woodland below us. We parked a few hundred metres further down the road and set out on foot to get there. This is my video report that I captured and I apologise for the clickbaity title of the video and the fact that it's so weird it looks staged. But it really isn't! My girlfriends reaction to this is real and we were definitely creeped out by our find. If anyone has any idea of what this ceremony was about, please let me know! Video Link
  5. After a mess up with directions on a saturday explore decided to go for a walk with Miss CSI on sunday and see this lovely old church, been before and love it every time I see it. Heres some history:- St.Andrew's church is a partly redundant anglican church in covehithe suffolk, it's grade I listed. Part of the church is in ruins and is under the churches conservation trust. It stands on a lane leading to the sea, which has suffered significant ongoing coastal erosion. The eldest fabric in the original large medieval church dates from the 14th century but most of it from the 15th century. During the civil war of charles 1st much of the stained glass was destroyed. By the later part of that century the large church was too expensive for the parishioners to maintain, they were given permission in 1672 to remove the roof and to build a smaller church within it. The pews were 15th Century and the pulpit is 17th century. Enjoy the pics:-
  6. A seminary in France that was later used as a medical centre and with a beautiful chapel! I think it closed within the past decade. Thanks for looking!
  7. King’s Hall Southall Visited with @GK_WAX and @Lavino. This was a long arsed day but a good un non the less. The lads picked me up just gone midnight for the long drive down south. I’d been to a gig and I was smashed hoping to get some sleep in the car. Fat chance of that. After nailing some greasy takeaway on my way back from town and downing a crate of redbulls I was pretty awake, sobered up and ready for some derpingz. After gaining access, which was very straightforward we found ourselves a lovely skanky little room to chill out in for a couple of hours whilst we waited for sunrise. Bumped into two other explorers in there who gave @GK_WAX a heart attack LOL! It’s a pretty cool place this, a lot bigger than what photo’s you see online, but all of the rooms at the back are pretty much the same old derpy office/classroom type and not much character to photograph. It’s amazing that this place hasn’t been shut for as long as it looks because it’s super fooked. Absolutely hammered with pigeons and mountains of their shit. Plaster falling down from every possible point, the floors are all warped like some big shit parquet Mexican wave, but still it is a pretty unique building with some lovely tiling and worth popping over to if you’re around this way. After here we tried a few other places in the area and on the way back, sadly to no avail. You can’t win em all eh. So yeah long arse drive home just in time to watch the footy order a pizza and get back on the beers. History Located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was built in 1916 and was designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The King’s Hall building has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and it was soon screening religious films. By 1926, it was operating as a regular cinema, still managed by the Methodist church. The King’s Hall Cinema was closed in 1937. It then reverted back to a Methodist Church use as the King’s Hall Methodist Church. They vacated the building in January 2013. Pics
  8. Just a crappy stripped out church, but something about it would tickle the nipples of a god fearing nun. But I liked it enough to take a few pictures anyway. I 'm almost sorry you had to look this report, I am scraping the barrel, but I'm not really sorry
  9. This one required an early start, but the morning adventure to The Kings Hall was worth the effort. Visited with Zombizza. History "Located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was built in 1916 and was designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The King’s Hall building has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and it was soon screening religious films. By 1926, it was operating as a regular cinema, still managed by the Methodist church. The King’s Hall Cinema was closed in 1937. It then reverted back to a Methodist Church use as the King’s Hall Methodist Church. They vacated the building in January 2013" The Explore Started nice and early, and managed our entrance fairly incident free...if we don't count the massive tear in my trousers.. It's a pretty spectacular place with a wonderful blend of natural decay and marvelous original features/architecture. With little to no daylight, we decided to wonder round the back rooms while the sun came up before the spending too much time on the main attraction, the large auditorium. The rooms around the back are a weird mix of new and old, some of them being more disgusting than others. One room was so pungent that I took 2 steps in before bailing out. There was also one room that was filled with beds, old food packets and needles. Looked a few years old, but squatters for sure. The larger rooms consisted of meeting rooms, prayer rooms and teaching rooms. All of them had funky wavy flooring where the wooden floor tiles had expanded with moisture. Eventually the sun came up and the auditorium started to flood with the golden morning light. After a few hours we left, although the exit was hilariously unsubtle. Photos The Auditorium
  10. This was the first stop on our weekend tour. It was a long arse drive from the tunnel to say the least! Cost a small fortune in tolls! A beautiful building inside! History: The construction of the chapel began mid 1800, This chapel is decorated in triforium (the openings of the galleries, above the aisles of a church, overlooking the nave), which is rare, for it is devoid of side aisles. Thanks for looking!
  11. A quick one this but I'm quite happy with how it came out. St. Pauls church was completed in 1849 and shut in 1999. It was (at least in 2008) on the market for the somewhat bargin price of £170,000. Now you dont get the windows with that (they have been auctioned off) you do however get multiple pigeon corpses and the splended aroma they have left behind... A cracking little church and it's sad to see it in the state it's in. Like if you like subscribe if you wish comments welcome
  12. After having been offline for months, it was time to work on some pics again. Yeah, cool… 1 set down. 500+ to go…. Brief history; In 1913 this rather pretty brick church was build. Back in the day it belonged to Russia or Ukraine, not sure. After the 2nd WW, it was given back to Poland and wasn't used as a church after that time. Until 1990 it served it’s purpose as storage space/warehouse and was abandoned after that time, in desperate need for repair. Even though there’s nothing left inside, it was still a nice place to spent an hour and take some snaps. The murals are in exceptional condition, considering it’s been left to rot for many years. Hopefully one day it’ll be restored to its full glory, although I doubt it ever will be. So on with the shots; 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Thanks for looking... Cheers!
  13. History St. Paul’s Church is a grade II listed building that overlooks the small town of Denholme. It was designed by J. B. Chantrell and constructed in 1846, and represents an early English style of architecture which comprises a seven-bay nave and lean to aisles, a Chancel and a vaulted roof with ribs and bosses. As for the exterior, the building is built from coursed gritstone with ashlar dressings and it boasts a large western tower with a Welsh slate roof. The church closed in 1999 due to falling numbers in the parish. In the months that followed the closure of the building, the Church of England were able to remove the majority of the valuable items, such as the bells, the ground floor stained glass windows and the organ. At present, the church is said to be on the market for £170,000 and various plans have been submitted to convert the entire structure into one dwelling. Alternative plans have also been proposed to demolish the church and build residential housing on the site. Many concerns have been raised by local residents and the Bradford Diocese about the current condition of the building as it has been badly damaged by vandals and thieves. Our Version of Events It was a cold December morning when eight WildBoyz decided it would be a good idea to have a drive over to Liverpool for the New Year. On our journey towards the beer, fireworks and other celebratory shenanigans, we decided to stop off at a few locations and take some snaps. The first stop-off along the way was St. Paul’s Church, which we spotted as we bombed our way through the small town of Denholme. Keen to get out of the cars and stretch our legs, we parked up in one of the nicest residential estates any proper northern lad has ever seen in his entire life. Trying hard to blend in with the locals as we walked towards the old church, we made casual conversation about men’s country clothing, golf and skiing in the alps. Our knowledge of such topics was limited, however, so our discussion only managed to get us halfway to the church gates. From that point on, we turned back into a wild throng of yobs. Conversation quickly slipped back to our usual topics: food, boobs and torch chat. From the graveyard access into the church wasn’t too difficult, thanks to some local Reebok clad chavs. So, within minutes each of us were stood inside the main navel gazing at our ruined surroundings. For the most part, the building is absolutely fucked. Most of the furniture is either broken or stacked into chaotic piles, and many of the old wall plaques are broken and cracked. It seems that some fucking bellend thinks it’s acceptable to smash commemorative tablets… There’s evidence of a fair few holes in the floor too, but the sheer amount of pigeon shit that’s been allowed to build up over the years has covered most of these over. The blue painted ceiling is still rather nice to look at though, especially from the upstairs balcony. After spending a good few minutes inside the main part of the church, we decided to have a search for a way inside the western tower. At first, access seemed impossible because the only way up appeared to be through a massive hole in the ceiling of the tower, which was a good few metres high. With only a broken ladder at our disposal, which itself was at least three metres to short anyway, all hope of getting up there seemed lost. As it turned out, however, we’d walked past the real way up about several times: a small spiral staircase at the base of the tower near main front doors. Once up inside the tower, we quickly discovered that it was very tower-like. It was clear that it once housed bells, but today it’s merely home to thousands of fetid one-legged pigeons. As the smell of shit brought tears to our eyes we didn’t hang about for very long up there. And that about concludes our little trip to St. Paul’s Church. It’s damp, mostly trashed and fairly grotty, but it still makes for a good photo or two if you happen to be passing by. Fifteen minutes after arriving, we headed back to the cars and set off in the direction of the famous Queensbury Tunnel. As it was only around the corner, it seemed like a wasted opportunity not to visit it. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Meek-Kune-Do, Rizla Rider, The Hurricane, Box, Husky and Soul. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21: 22: 23:
  14. Whilst on a trip to Scotland.me and missy visited this old church.cant find any history on it.but it is defiantly very decayed now.just a "T" shaped main room.and a little extension out back for making tea and a toilet.the light and colours in here were lovely.with some beautiful light coming through.the church floor was littered in bird crap and lots of dead crows.surprisingly not pigeons as there usually is..the tower steps were collapsed in so no getting up there sadly.
  15. A beautiful abandoned red colored church somewhere in Germany. It was pretty late when we arrived and the light inside was very hard. I didn't manage to get everything straight, or that church wasn't symmetric, I don't know, it drived me crazy haha. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5
  16. History “The architecture and much of the decoration of St. Marie’s cathedral uses designs and motifs from English churches built before the Reformationâ€. The Cathedral Church of St. Marie is an English Roman Catholic Cathedral, located in Sheffield city centre. It was designed by Matthew Ellison Hadfield, a Victorian Gothic Revival architect who was well-known for his work on Roman Catholic churches, and constructed between 1846 and 1850. Before the cathedral was constructed, a smaller chapel existed on the same site; this was known as Sheffield’s Medieval Parish Church of St. Peter. During the reign of Henry VIII, St. Peter’s was destroyed and most of the Catholic priests were hunted down and murdered or imprisoned. The congregation, too, were socially excluded and faced loss of property and possessions. By the late 18th Century, however, Catholics were able to worship more freely in Sheffield (though not completely) and, subsequently, a small group of priests purchased a house (The Lord’s House which was built by the Duke of Norfolk) on the corner of Fargate and Norfolk Row; this was close to where the cathedral now stands. A new small chapel was discretely constructed in the back garden and the remaining land became a cemetery in later years when Catholic’s were legally allowed to practice their religion. Some parts of the original building continue to exist to this day. By 1846, the chapel was deemed too small for the number of worshippers attending on a regular basis, therefore, Fr. Pratt - a young priest who was becoming increasingly prominent in Sheffield – sought out Hadfield to design a larger building that could cater for the expanding city. Hadfield used the design of a 14th Century church in Heckington, Lincolnshire, to sketch plans for a new site of worship. Upon completion the church was expensively decorated; courtesy of the Duke of Norfolk, who supported the project with money and additional generous ornamental donations. Unfortunately, Fr. Pratt never witnessed the completion of the church because he died on 17th February 1849 (aged 38) whilst it was still being constructed. His body was initially buried at St. Bede’s, in Rotherham, along with all of the other people who were moved from the original cemetery. Yet, in spite of the decision to move Pratt to Bede’s, a stonemason, who had often heard Pratt suggest that he wanted to be buried at St. Marie’s, decided to secretly dig up the coffin and rebury it in a tomb near the newly positioned altar inside St. Marie’s. To this day, the body had remained in that same location. As above, St. Marie’s was completed in 1950 and it officially opened on September 11th. The cost of the church exceeded £10,500 and, despite the Duke’s support, it took almost forty years to pay off the debt. The Parish of St. Marie’s, which covered the whole of Sheffield, became part of the Diocese of Beverley in the same year when the Catholic Diocese were re-established for the first time since the Reformation. Like most churches and chapels, St. Marie’s was extended in later years (1902) as the congregation continued to grow. During the Second World War, however, all progress halted when a bomb blew out a number of the stained glass windows. To prevent the remaining ones from being destroyed, the church decided to remove the glass and store it in a shaft inside Nunnery Colliery for the duration of the war. In spite of these efforts, the mine flooded after unusually heavy rainfall and the stained glass sunk in mud; the drawings were also all destroyed. In 1947, however, some of the windows were rediscovered and the church were able to restore them. The church became a listed building in 1973, and later, on May 30th 1980, the New Diocese of Hallam was created; meaning St. Marie’s became a cathedral. Initially, St. Marie’s had been part of the Diocese of Leeds. Bishop Moverley was placed as its first bishop and he served until his death in 1996. Thereafter, Bishop Rt. Rev. Ralph Heskett was installed as the second Bishop of Hallam. Recently St. Marie’s has been awarded a Heritage Lottery Funded grant to conserve its heritage. The project will allow the conservation and long term preservation of the unaltered 19th Century Lewis organ, the highly decorated Victorian wall tiles and the 15th Century alabaster panels. Our Version of Events After a little wander around Sheffield, to see if the sites have changed at all, we spotted some new scaff and this time it was around the cathedral! Instantaneously, we gave in to temptation and set about creating some sort of plan. Ten minutes later, with the plan in full effect, we sat and enjoyed a beer and some food; waiting for the cover of darkness. After a few hours of that, later on that same evening, we set off once again, back to the cathedral. Once we arrived outside, we had to make sure we timed our entry carefully, in between passing pedestrians, but somehow we managed it without being seen. Although it’s normally quite quiet in Sheffield city centre, on this night everyone seemed to be out for a walk. After that we focused on climbing to the top. The climb itself wasn’t particularly challenging, but since you feel quite exposed as you get higher the thrill is certainly there. We did attempt to hide in the shadows where shadows were available, however, since it was a very clear night, there weren’t many around. At the top we were able to access the actual tower itself and could walk around the entire thing; this meant that we were able to see the old gargoyles and decorative features close up. The tower of the cathedral offers some fantastic views of Sheffield; yet another vantage point from which we could gaze at the city below. And yet, despite the awesome views, the highlight for myself was when the old clock bells chimed at a certain hour: they were loud and gave us a good taste of their music. Explored with Soul. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17:
  17. History : St John's was built between 1890 and 1892 to a design by the Lancaster architects Paley, Austin and Paley. The estimated cost of the church was £6,800 but, because of problems with the foundations, its final cost, including the fittings, was nearer to £12,000 (£1,170,000 in 2015). It provided seating for 616 people.Financial donations towards the site and structure of the church were made by Thomas Brooks, 1st Baron Crawshaw of Crawshaw Hall. Because of diminishing numbers attending the church, and because of thefts of lead from the roof of the church, the congregation has decided to opt for the church to be declared redundant. The church was declared redundant on 20 February 2012. Warning, pic heavy. Outside Alter A few statues Nice curtains I've no idea what this is called Had a bit of fun inside.. Finally..
  18. How to post a report using Flickr Flickr seems to change every time the wind changes direction so here's a quick guide on how to use it to post a report... Step 1 - Explore and take pictures Step 2 - Upload your chosen pictures to Flickr like this.. Step 3 - Once your images are successfully uploaded to flickr choose a category for the location that you have visited... Step 4 - Then "Start New Topic".. You will then see this screen... Step 5 - Now you are ready to add the image "links", known as "BBcodes", which allow your images to display correctly on forums.. Step 6 - Then click "select" followed by "view on photo page".. Now select "Share" shown below.. Step 7-13 - You will then see this screen... Just repeat those steps for each image until you're happy with your report and click "submit topic"! You can edit your report for 24 hours after posting to correct errors. If you notice a mistake outside of this window contact a moderator and they will happily rectify the problem for you
  19. Hi all a nice new report from me on a recent explore. This is a cracking little church with some awesome stuff still left and very photographic. And seeing has its close to christmas this seems like a good time to do it and post it. Some awesome stuff here like the tower and the bell. In what i coulden't resist to ring hell ive always wantd to have a go. But bloody hell its a lot louder than ya think lol. And that was via a little tap. Anyways met a few people here not to many just 4. So all in all was not to bad was expecting a coach to be here to be honest lol. So went with the missus and she loved every bit of it. It was a great place indeed not sure how much longer she got has wont be long before kids etc start to fook her up but for now shes a stunner. I'm sure you all going to like this one. Picked a cracking day for this has it was the village christmas party. So everone was busy. Can see why its stood the test of youth etc has its in an incredibly viewable place where loads of people can see what ya up to. And homes built right next to it practicaly on the ground lol. Anyways armed with a new camera thx to @ACID-REFLUX off we went. I would also like to add that the climb up the tower is a bitch and bloody narrow. The only shot i seem to have missed is that of the organ. Not to bad a loss has its in semi decent condition not sure how i forgot. Also there is a basement but a fat ass like me cant fit lol. And there is electric and water still on in this place. And has a word of caution in the tower the floors are in an extremely bad way. Major butt tightning. History : St John's was built between 1890 and 1892 to a design by the Lancaster architects Paley, Austin and Paley. The estimated cost of the church was �6,800 but, because of problems with the foundations, its final cost, including the fittings, was nearer to �12,000 (�1,170,000 in 2015). It provided seating for 616 people.Financial donations towards the site and structure of the church were made by Thomas Brooks, 1st Baron Crawshaw of Crawshaw Hall. Because of diminishing numbers attending the church, and because of thefts of lead from the roof of the church, the congregation has decided to opt for the church to be declared redundant. The church was declared redundant on 20 February 2012. The church is constructed in sandstone with Yorkshire stone dressings and is roofed in green Cumberland slate. Its architectural style is Perpendicular.[2] The plan consists of a nave and chancel in one range, north and south aisles, a south transept, and a north transept above which rises a tower. A clerestory rises above the aisles along the length of the nave, to the south of the chancel is a chapel, and to its north is a vestry. There is a porch in the westernmost bay of the south aisle, and another porch in the angle of the south transept.[2][6] On each side of the clerestory are ten square-headed two-light windows. The west window has five lights and contains intersecting tracery. Along the aisles are buttresses and two-light windows. The south transept also has buttresses, and a large five-light window containing Perpendicular and curvilinear tracery. The chancel has a large east window with six lights containing Perpendicular tracery. The tower has diagonal corner buttresses that rise to octagonal turrets surmounted by crocketed pinnacles. The summit of the tower has an embattled parapet.[2] Interior The interior of the church is lined with red Rainhill sandstone.[6] The five-bay arcades are carried alternately on round and octagonal columns. The chancel arch is high, and has two orders of moulding. There are carved wooden screens between the nave and the chancel, and between the chancel and the north transept. Some of the choir stalls have elaborately carved crocketed canopies containing statues.[2] The reredos dates from the 20th century, and contains statues of the Four Evangelists. The font is hexagonal. In the church are memorials to members of the Brooks family.[6] Inside the tower, and near to the tower, are carved texts from Psalm 148.[5] The Church of England Commissioners had agreed the sale of the church to a small non trading renewable energy company in 2013. However a planning application was rejected in January 2015, as the plans involved the removal of 80% of the tree's on the site, most of which have Tree Preservation Orders on them. The siting of one 40ft and two 20ft used shipping containers in place of the tree's was also cited by planners the reason for rejecting the scheme.[9][10] As the site has been removed from the Church's list of buildings for sale, its current status is unknown. PICS: Christmas shots lol The bell .. It goes DONG loudly lol Really pissed at this shot has i really really wanted it. But was major dark and fooking floor moves and shit the shit being bomb diving bloody pidgeons sure these fookers take after an old japanese custom lol. Sorry for blur but give ya idea of it. Atleast the inside bell shot came out ok. The tower stairs Sorry for pic heavy just so much to shoot. Anways these last 2 are my faves so will say thanks for looking and have a good christmas all. Merry christmas have a great time and thanks for looking at the stunning church.
  20. This one has been on the back burner of my list of things to do, but with its comparatively remote location (over 100 miles from my house) I have finally got round to having a look whilst on a huge roadtrip to visit my mate in Nowheresville, Lincolnshire. This place has been closed aprox 30 years, and is rare in that the roof is in good condition, but is no longer used. Visited on my own, on a fine spring day earlier this year. thanks for looking
  21. The Visit Lowlight for me was falling through the dodgy MDF floor upstairs, luckily didn't go right through as a beam caught me in what you can imagine was a little painful. That aside, this is a lovely little church and still in relatively nice condition. The History The origins of St. Saviour's At Stubbylee Hall, Bacup, lived Mr. John Holt, J.P., a Christian man with a real concern for the spiritual needs of the people living on his estate around the Lee Mill area. His dreams of building a church were not fulfilled in his own lifetime. When St. John's fell into a state of extreme disrepair and collapse a committee was formed to rebuild it but progress in making the necessary arrangements was so slow that one of the members of the committee, Mr. James Maden Holt (the son of Mr. John Holt) withdrew and determined to go ahead with the building of a church at Stubbylee. After obtaining the consent of the incumbent of St. John's, the Rev. B. Tweedale, and of the Bishop of the diocese to the assignment of a district for the proposed new church, Mr. Holt looked round for a suitable clergyman to tackle the undertaking. He learned that the Rev. William Whitworth, Vicar of St. Jude's, Ancoats, was willing to accept the onerous task of working up the new- parish and invited him to be the first vicar. Mr. Whitworth was duly licensed and began his labours in an old mill at Rockliffe. It was intended that these premises should be only temporary so very few alterations were made. The floor was covered with sawdust and benches mounted on bricks were used as pews. Worship commenced there in 1854. Work now began on the Sunday School building in New Line and was completed in 1858. The congregation and scholars were called together for a final address by Mr. Whitworth in Rockliffe Mill. A procession then formed and marched to the new school, which was opened by Mr. Whitworth who gave a further address. The upper part of the school was used as a church for the next few years. The vicarage was built next and Mr. Whitworth took up residence there about 1860, shortly before the building of the church commenced. The church was consecrated on Monday, the 23rd of January, 1865, by the Lord Bishop of Manchester, the Right Rev. J. Fraser, and was designated "St. Saviour's, Bacup". Representatives of the local Wesleyan, Baptist and Independent churches were present at the service. The cost of the erection of the church, school and vicarage was borne entirely by Mr. James Maden Holt and amounted, as near as can be ascertained, to £8,000, £2,000 and £1,400 respectively, exclusive of the value of the sites And finally, the resulting hole in the floor
  22. 1000 mile Mega Xplore day 2 part 4 (These are not in order) After kipping in the car in the corner of a field we made our way here, bit of a walk but, this must be one of the oddest places I have been too. If I knew what it was like inside I would have slept on the floor in there and waited for daybreak. https://www.flickr.com/photos/cunningplan/albums/72157659274332585 the outside the inside
  23. I thought it would be nice if I post here something from the UK I was on a vacationtrip last year and I did some research to find some locs I could visit during our stay in the UK. I found pictures of this churchruin and I decided that I have to find it!! So I did, but I didn't excactly where it would be in the woods. So finally we drove into a small road and suddenly there it was, me happy There was a "litle" hill and I went down and al settled down it started to rain with thunder so really hard that I impossible could hide under the trees. So I climbed back on the hill and waited in the car.....very long until the sun came Ok, so let's do this quickly, down the hill, make some shots and up the hill again. Nice workout About the history: It was build in 1880. In the weekdays they used it as a school and in the weekends as church. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8
  24. The Visit Considered this one in the past but lots of activity next door at the tile shop so difficult to access unnoticed at times. Passing on an early morning we thought we'd have a quick look about. Lasting memory of this place is the pigeon sh*t! Never seen it so deep anywhere The History Built in 1861, St Joseph's Catholic Church is a grade II listed building on the fringe of Wigan town centre and was the Sunday school of a certain George Formby. It's been closed since 1995 and is a burden around the church's neck. They (and Wigan Council) are hoping someone comes along and takes it under their wing in this quarter's redevelopment of the mills and waterfront area. An example of quite how deep the bird poo is in here
  25. 2nd of 4 visits on Sunday with 2 other people, was a tricky little access but worth it in the end. Bit of an empty shell now but still worth it. History - Mount St Mary's is one of the architectural treasures of the city of Leeds. It is a grade two listed building dating from 1853. The laying of the foundation stone was an act of faith in itself as the founders of the church, the missionary order of the Oblates of Mary Immaculate had little idea as to where the money was to be found to complete the building. The church stands high on the crest of Richmond Hill and can be seen from many parts of the city. The slope below the church had been known for hundreds of years as 'the Bank'. For many, Mount St Mary's is the Famine Church, the original chapel was established at a time when Ireland was only beginning to recover from the Great Hunger brought on by the failure of the potato crop in successive years from 1845 to 1851. Hundreds of families, many of them suffering from the effects of starvation and 'famine fever, found some in what became Mount St Mary's parish. The story of how the church came to be established in the first place, on the initiative of men from the neighbouring St Saviour's Anglican church who were received into the Roman Catholic Church is more than just a footnote in English Church history. These were the people who persuaded the Oblates of Mary Immaculate to establish a chapel in Richmond Street, the Bank. It is impossible to calculate the contribution that Mount St Mary's made in creating a community out of the mass of desperate refugees who found themselves living on the Bank or in other parts of the parish. It was not just the ministrations of the clergy that went to forge this new community. It was the work carried out in caring for the sick and the poor, the setting up of the schools and the orphanage. Most of the latter work being carried out by the Sisters of the Holy Family. One must not forget either, the sodalities and societies within the parish that did so much to bind the community together. Despite the widespread poverty and deprivation that persisted so long, it became a community with a strong identity and contributed so much to the development of the city of Leeds. (copied from another post) 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14 15:
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