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  1. The old primary school has apparently been abandoned for quite some time. Crumbling plaster is leading the way. Decay as far as the eye can see. Now and then friendly yet strong reminders written somewhere: "Instortingsgevaar" (danger of collapse). Certain areas of the school building are definitely in a pretty bad condition which is obvious even without knowledge in statics. Remnants of the former school life are scattered throughout the whole building. Toys, photos of former students as well as old books. All these things just intensify the frozen in time atmosphere. A beautiful little place left to rot right in the middle of active school grounds. That´s the reason we chose the summer holidays for our visit. Despite of that the grounds were really busy that day. Apparently, preparations for the upcoming school year took place. Sneaking into the building was quite easy, whereas sneaking outside unseen became an almost undoable task. While taking photos inside the grounds had become more and more busy. The only chance was trying to head towards the exit as fast as possible. And so the inevitable happened. Only few steps after leaving our building we heard a loud "Hey" behind us. Two workers appeared but couldn´t hide their smiles. Still feeling relief a woman, probably the headmaster, came out of the active school building opposite of ours and shouted angrily at us threatening us to call the police. Disappearing as fast as possible was the only option now. Barbed wire or not. After a detour to our car and an adrenaline level slowly going back to normal we finally escaped safely. A brief look back to our arrival: while searching for a parking space we were watched by an elderly man standing behind his window with his curtains in his hand. He observed us so obviously so that we decided to look for another place to park our car. Yet not before waving at the conspiciously behaving man who responded by waving back at us right away. So better never tend to underestimate the local "security". 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
  2. Chateau Marianne / Chateau Alchimiste History Not much history on this location but it was rumoured to be have been once occupied by a former professor. The chateau is located in a small, rural town in France. The town's residents have halved in the last 40 years and it was beginning to look quite run down. I can imagine the nickname 'Alchimiste' (which means Alchemist in French) came from all the chemistry equipment left behind such as: test tubes, syringes, bottles, cylinders and beakers. It seems the previous inhabitant was also a bit of an artist, we found many paintings scattered around the house and a large collection in the attic, as well as a small studio in an upstairs room. Visit I visited this beautiful chateau on a euro trip with @PROJ3CTM4YH3M. We went the previous night to check to see if it was accessible and boy we were in for a shock! Neither of us realised how much stuff had been left and how interesting the contents were. We both particularly liked the framed butterfly collection which was hung up in one of the living rooms, as it reminded us of the film 'Silence of the Lambs.' After a short investigation we decided to return the following day and booked a hotel in a nearby town. Arriving the next morning once sun had risen, the place was really brought into it's element. So, as always, hope you enjoy my photos! If you got this far, thanks for reading.
  3. First post on here guys so hope it works! Tipped off by a friend Matt about this house I decided to go one cold winter morning to see it for myself on a solo run. Entry into the house a tricky assault course through the overgrown garden which hasn't been tended to for decades by the look of it. A very peculiar house this in that its location is in a sleepy little village of pure chocolate box quintessential Englishness. A more desirable a place to live would be hard to find to get away form the chaos of city life. Clean air and peaceful surroundings, the parish church all capture the imagination yet this house contradicts everything around it. Somewhat derelict with overgrown gardens, a rusty old iron gate with a disappearing path leading up to the house don't fit in to its surroundings. What the local residents make of it I'd love to know. Why it has been left to fall into such a bad state is anyone's guess. I would imagine the house itself is worth a lot of money having 4 bedrooms and a lot of land regardless of the location which I'd imagine to be quite expensive to live in. Doesn't anyone own the house and if so why have they just left it for so long to fall into disrepair? It's not really secured either so it doesn't seem like anyone ever goes to the house to check on it. Very strange. From the decor and the possessions still left inside I'd date it becoming abandoned around the mid 1980s. Piles and piles of newspapers - mainly The Daily Mail & The Telegraph - clutter each room. Using a tripod proved tricky as the floors were covered in stacks of old newspapers. The most recent date I could find without checking all the hundreds left around was 1984. Maybe one of the former residents was a hoarder of newspapers? In the entire house there were literally thousands left behind no room escaped their occupancy. There were few clues as to who lived here, just names on envelopes which obviously won't be revealed. What their occupations were I have no idea. Downstairs were two reception rooms littered with vintage possessions including several televisions a typewriter a Bakelite rotary telephone amongst other things. The most interesting items were the framed portraits of children. Who were they and where are they now? Piles of old photographs and personal documents were left behind on the writing/study desk seemingly unwanted by anyone. A double split staircase leads to the upstairs bedrooms. Two were empty so weren't photographed, the other two still had everything left behind including clothes and yet more newspapers. I always think that every abandoned home must have an owner somewhere. It seems this one - despite its obvious appeal to potential buyers - seems to be truly abandoned with no one left to have any interest in it. Enjoy the images
  4. Hi all I'm back again! Today we went and visited an old boarding school in Chichester. We did not know if the place was abandoned but we got a tip to say it "might" be abandoned. Well...we went to check out this place and my god it has got to be one of the better ones I've been to. No graffiti onsite but just an awesome explore all in all! HISTORY: The site itself originally started life as a boarding school and has a full range of classrooms, studios and offices. They had an onsite IT room which could fit up to 20 students at a time and also 2 large greenhouses for training in horticultural skills. The centre itself was very highly-regarded in the area and was built within the grounds of a grade II listed house. It went on to become a residential educational and training centre until the site officially closed its doors in 2011. Enjoy the video and if you really liked it feel free to subscribe to our channel!
  5. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. A former ballhaus somewhere in the eastern of Germany. At the moment they are renovating the building and for a small amount of money you can get acces for taking photographs.
  6. Mineral Springs Bath House History The construction of the Mineral Springs Bath House began in 1907. This was in order to bring in more tourism and wealth into the area. The town it was built in was an excellent location to host a bath house, as it was well known for it's rich mineral water sources which was believed to have medicinal properties. During the start of the 20th century mineral baths were a very fashionable and popular leisure activity. It took 3 years to build, with the help of local residents and neighbouring villages. It was finally unveiled with a ceremony in 1911. The materials which were used for the interior were designed in Vienna, France and Belgium and it was the most expensive healing bath in Bulgaria at that current time. Typical to most bath houses, it was separated into two sections, one for the men and another for the women. Both areas accommodated for it's visitors with a large circular pool, changing rooms and 10 bathtubs. The baths also provided central heating facilities, the main parts of the building were kept consistently at 15°C, the changing rooms at 28°C and the baths themselves were 32°C. The bath house was also equip with a clinic, admin offices and a large laundry room. Sadly the Mineral Springs Baths eventually closed in 2001, due to the decline in interest and popularity along with the lack of investment by the local government. Visit As always, visited with @darbians on a long weekend trip to Bulgaria. We were both feeling pretty optimistic once we'd seen the grand looking exterior on arrival and fortunately the interior certainly lived up to our expectations. Externals Internals If you've got this far, thanks for reading
  7. Colonia IL / Mono Orphanage History The orphanage was built on the border of Switzerland and Italy. Sadly there doesn't seem to be a lot of information out there regarding this location. From what I've gathered it originally served as an orphanage and at some point in time, it was also used as a summer camp. Despite being closed during the 1970's, it has remained in pretty good condition with minimal graffiti and vandalism. Visit Visited again with @darbians and @vampiricsquid. Unfortunately when we visited the beds had been removed but lucky there was still a lot left to photograph. The chapel was absolutely stunning and it was nice to see that some furniture, including the desks from the classrooms were still there. All in all an excellent location to finish off our Italian adventure.
  8. Did you ever went to an Island full of creepy dolls??? NO??? Let me take you with you! On my holiday in December 2017 to Mexico I heard about this place so I had to go. There is no holiday without finding some decayed stuff! The story goes as followed: The guy who lives on this Island found a girl who was drowned around the island. He also found a doll floating nearby and, assuming it belonged to the deceased girl so he hung it on a tree as a sign of respect. After he did that he heard whispers and foodsteps around his hut where he lived. He started to collect and hang more and more old dolls to calm down the spirit of the drowned girl. In 2001 the owner of the Island died and was found on the same spot where the girl was found. When I wanted to go to this place I had to find someone who wanted to bring me there because it was hard to reach according to people around there because of latest hurricanes and earthquakes . After a lot of negotiations I found someone with a little boat to go there and to be honest it was worth the whole trip!! I hope you liked it! Let me know what you think! Marco Bontenbal https://pixanpictures.com
  9. Hey, guys, we are the Urban Collective and we don't want you to think we're here for views or to sell teeshirts like most of the tripe you see on YouTube (No disrespect intended)... We actually have a genuine new found passion for #UrbanExploration and have been constantly uploading Photographic and video reports to @obliviontate recently and will continue to do so. We'd just like take a moment to share our new trailer for the channel for a bit of feedback and just to let you guys know we exist. We're always paying attention to what others do, and give good positive feedback on posts across the forum and the web. We adhere to the rules Urban Exploring and would just like to continue to share our experiences photos videos etc with like minded people within an awesome community. We are just that face in the crowd watching as the high streets dwindle and the corporations take over. We are The Urban Collective We Film It... By the way guys, i hope I posted this in the right place? Sorry if I didn't I didn't want to post it in the videos bit because it is not a report cheers guy's.
  10. The Old Unknown Farmhouse - Chorley - Photographic Report - Feb 2018 I struggled to find any history on this stunning location except for the multitude of artifacts left inside from photographs to a pencil sketch by a man called Brian jay and the possibility that the property was once owned by a freemason. I have to admit guys this was my favorite explore to date. From the artifacts in and around the property including that stunning Vauxhall, my favorite find to date. To the general atmosphere of the old place. I had a quality time man and a trip back through it.
  11. Explored a long road and found a house that was abandoned, some evidence of vandalism, not the most interesting of building but the way it has naturally fallen is quite beautiful
  12. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Little house somewhere in Belgium. Seems there lived an 103 year old lady and after a fire on the upper floor she left the house. Her son still comes there every week to feed the cat.
  13. Built in 1896 and in continuous use until 1995, this pinwheel style quaker prison was a reflection of a similar one located nearby. You can tour that one for a few dollars and take as many pictures as you like. This one was not so easy.... It was the site of a controversial decades-long dermatological, pharmaceutical, and biochemical weapons research projects involving testing on inmates. The prison is also notable for several major riots in the early 1970s. The prison was home to several trials which raised several ethical and moral questions pertaining to the extent to which humans can be experimented on. In many cases, inmates chose to undergo several inhumane trials for the sake of small monetary reward. The prison was viewed as a human laboratory. “All I saw before me were acres of skin. It was like a farmer seeing a fertile field for the first time.” Dr. X One inmate described experiments involving exposure to microwave radiation, sulfuric and carbonic acid, solutions which corroded and reduced forearm epidermis to a leather-like substance, and acids which blistered skin in the testicular areas. In addition to exposure to harmful chemical agents, patients were asked to physically exert themselves and were immediately put under the knife to remove sweat glands for examination. In more gruesome accounts, fragments of cadavers were stitched into the backs of inmates to determine if the fragments could grow back into functional organs. So common was the experimentation that in the 1,200-person prison facility, around 80% to 90% of inmates could be seen experimented on. The rise of testing harmful substances on human subjects first became popularized in the United States when President Woodrow Wilson allowed the Chemical Warfare Service (CAWS) during World War I. All inmates who were tested upon in the trials had consented to the experimentation, however, they mostly agreed for incentives like monetary compensation. Experiments in the prison often paid around $30 to $50 and even as much as $800. “I was in prison with a low bail. I couldn’t afford the monies to pay for bail. I knew that I wasn’t guilty of what I was being held for. I was being coerced to plea bargain. So, I thought, if I can get out of this, get me enough money to get a lawyer, I can beat this. That was my first thought.” I expected to find an epic medical ward only to be filled with disappointment. The practice was so common I can only assume it was conducted everywhere. Many advocates of the prison trials, such as Solomon McBride, who was an administrator of the prisons, remained convinced that there was nothing wrong with the experimentation at the Holmesburg prison. McBride argued that the experiments were nothing more than strapping patches of cloth with lotion or cosmetics onto the backs of patients and argued this was a means for prisoners to earn an easy income. The negative public opinion was particularly heightened by the 1973 Congressional Hearing on Human Experimentation. The hearing was supposed to discuss the Tuskegee Syphilis Study and clarify the ethical and legal implications of human experimental research. This climate called for a conscious public which rallied against the use of vulnerable populations such as prisoners as guinea pigs. Companies and organizations who associated themselves with human testing faced severe backlash. Amidst the numerous senate hearings, public relation nightmares, and opponents to penal experimentation, county prison boards realized human experimentation was no longer acceptable to the American public. Swiftly, human testing on prisoners was phased out of the United States. Only a renovated gymnasium is considered suitable for holding inmates. That building is frequently used for overflow from other city jails. The district attorney launched an extensive two year investigation documenting hundreds of cases of the rape of inmates. The United States had ironically been strong enforcers of the Nuremberg Code and yet had not followed the convention until the 1990s. The Nuremberg code states: “[T]he person involved should have legal capacity to give consent; should be so situated as to be able to exercise free power of choice, without the intervention of any element of force, fraud, deceit, duress, overreaching, or other ulterior form of constraint or coercion; and should have sufficient knowledge and comprehension of the elements of the subject matter involved as to enable him to make an understanding and enlightened decision.” The prison trials violated this definition of informed consent because inmates did not know the nature of materials they were experimented with and only consented due to the monetary reward. America’s shutting down of prison experimentation such as those in the prison signified the compliance of the Nuremberg Code of 1947. You look so precious.
  14. Shot a few years ago before all the vandalism. No edits just a walk around. Was such a lovely place then. I believe restoration work is now well ongoing. This is great to hear. Thanks for looking I got plenty more films in the pipeline.
  15. Once in a while, I get actually excited about industrial locations, not that often to be honest but still. This was one of those moments, they even started demolishing parts of it, but still I thought it was worth a visit when the workmen had a day off. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.
  16. The only information I have about this one is coming from my grandparents, who used to know the people that lived there. It was the house of the principal of a little school close by, sadly enough they demolished it before I was into urbex. They called the man "mister pipe" since he always walked around smoking a pipe
  17. Matthews' Equestrian Center (Or Matthew's Riding School) was a well known, and well used site in medway, featuring on local and national media over the years. The equestrian centre is now in a very run down state, where flytipping is common. The site is badly damaged through fire and vandalism, though, some remains almost intact. The upper floors are difficult to walk on, due to incredibly thin wooden boards supported by rotting timber beams. The building is quite open to the elements, with a broken roof and in some places a non-existent roof. This is my first report, which will be quite picture heavy - Any criticisms will appreciated. And here is one piece of graffiti that we just quite like
  18. Hey folks sorry I have not posted in sometime been rather busy with so many trips an projects at the moment. Here is a wonderful decaying carehome, its closure was around 2000 an since natural decay has set in wonderfully, maybe too much as when you reach the top of the main staircase dont turn left as I figured out, the floors like wallpaper an lucky the radiator was there to "save" me. Anyway after exploring around here, we set off to some other places but upon our return home, my partner did not like her shots, so the next day we went back Enjoy the piccys! Thanks for looking everyone
  19. I finally got around to post this report, so here goes: If you didn't get to see my previous Belgium report, feel free to take a peek: 48 hours in Belgium 2014 I wake up in my hotel room in Amsterdam, later I'm going to meet up with @Merryprankster, @The_Raw and a non-member (Jane) in Antwerp, for some kick-ass urban exploration days. I grab a trusty sandwich and make my way to downtown Amsterdam. It is incredibly hot, hitting around 30 °C and I'm about to catch a train to Antwerp. The entire station is crowded and I can't find my train, which is supposed to depart in a few minutes. I finally find a train conductor who can tell me where to go. I make it to the correct platform, just as the train is rolling in. I get on the train, but just like the station, it's cramped. I literally end up sitting between two peoples luggage – but there's air-condition, so I can't really complain. Two hours and a pair of sore legs later, I'm finally there. The door opens to another train carriage, and it hits me… The stench of the sweat from 15 persons, all mixed together in a hot train-pot and left simmering for a few hours. I was told that our carriage, was the only one with functioning air-condition and I'm inclined to believe the person who told me that. I make my way through Central Antwerp Station and it's such a beautiful place, if you haven't seen it, google it. And knowing that I would be standing at the top of it all, gave me butterflies in my stomach. I head down to our hotel for the night, where I'm meeting with the rest of the guys. After our greetings and a few necessary ice creams, we make our way to: Château de la Chapelle. As the name might suggest, it's a large residential building. Complete with its own wine cellar and chapel. The size and number of chairs, suggests to me that it was used for weddings or the likes. The were signs of construction and I think it's definitely it's worth saving. A very beautiful building. The entire house is protected by a moat, where I managed to get a VERY wet shoe. I was later reminded of my clumsiness by another Belgian explorer: “I think you're the first one getting wet feet there”. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. After trying out another spot and not finding a way in, we head back to Antwerp. A take a quick shower and we head downtown for a copious amount of cheap chips. A big shoutout to The_Raw and The Antwerp crew for getting us up on: Antwerp Central Station The original station building was constructed between 1895 and 1905 and is regarded as one of the finest transportation buildings in Belgium – and I can see why. The station itself has four levels, with three levels for tracks, 14 platforms in use and a shopping center on the fourth level. The station also houses a diamond gallery with more than 30 diamond shops. Most likely a once in a lifetime experience to explore this. 11. (The station in the distance) 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. After the exploration, I wasn't feeling too well, so I got our only room key and went home for the night and the others went to explore a few other places. I was awoken early in the morning by a loud banging on the door. I opened the door to a very stern looking The_Raw. When he got home after the explore, I slept right through his door knocking and he therefor went to sleep on the roof of the hotel. Beers were brought as an apology. We made our way to Château Nottebohm. Château Nottebohm is cottage-style manor built in 1908 and it's history is a bit unclear. Some say it was built for the family Nottebohm, who were a very prominent family and known for their work in curing skin diseases, the manor was later occupied during WWII and during the 50's used as a hotel, banquet hall and restaurant. Others claim it was a wealthy German family living in the manor, whom fled during WWII and it was since left to decay. 17. 18. 19. Stick aroud for Part Two!
  20. The Xmas holidays made for some free time and the opportunity for me to explore. So I arranged a whole day out with my buddys and Storm LSF who was coming out with us for the 1st time.. So the Alarm goes of at 2:30am and I check the phone and 2 of the party have become lightweights We arrive at the south coast at 7am and its not good from the start. Fail, fail, and busted by a rather nice security guard. So it is onto our last stop of the day as it is now the afternoon and decided we would try this... With it being busy near the front doors we decided to head round the back and tackle the muddy and waterlogged fields and get in that way..... Once we had squeezed in (due to too much xmas choc I guess) it was time to grab a load of photos and then make a quick exit and get home for more xmas Choccys. And then as we are walking away we hear some shouting from the other side of the water from some folk, could not work out if it was get out of there or how did you get in lol, but we just stomped of into the sunset and headed home History Pinched from kkj The Clock House Brick Company Ltd was founded c.1933 to exploit a rich deposit of high-quality Weald Clay to the south of the Surrey village of Capel. Although the outbreak of war in 1939 brought some demand for bricks to help with the war effort, there was apparently little need for the high-grade hollow ceramic blocks which were Clockhouse's main product and conscription meant that there was also a severe shortage of labour. By 1941, the Company was in liquidation and sold the majority of its share capital to the London Brick Company (LBC) to avoid closing the works. In 1945, the Company was wound up for good and the works were acquired by the LBC. Under LBC, production was substantially increased, aided by the 1950s housing boom and in the 1960s the works was rebuilt to cope with ever increasing demand. The global financial crisis of 2008 hit the building materials industry hard: a sudden slump in housing prices meant that house-building ground almost to a halt and demand for bricks plummeted. In March 2009, a 'phased closure programme' which began later that month and led to the loss of 61 jobs with indication that there was no intention to re-activate the brickworks or extract clay from the adjacent pits. Since closure, Clockhouse Brickworks has been in limbo, slowly being stripped of anything valuable while a lengthy audit determines the planning conditions surrounding re-use of the site. Plans for an incinerator ('energy from waste facility') on the site, bitterly opposed by local residents, were thrown out by a High Court Judgment in 2009 and the future of the site is now uncertain. 1 2 3 4 5 6 :pThis is what I wanted to see here 7 35mm 8 85mm 9 17mm 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 And a few random pics from some place we got busted at during the day. Apparently we set of a PIR/alarm as we walked in 1 2
  21. A beautiful chateau tucked away in the French countryside... Luckily we got to see it just before it was horribly trashed! ...CHATEAU FACHOS... Thanks for lookin' in...
  22. Every so often you come across something unseen from forums or even the internet before, an considering I love exploring old houses this one I could not pass up on again, I first noticed this place a few months ago driving past it then a few weeks ago the other half remembered about it, as I had long forgotten so we decided to pay a visit upon route to another house. Not much room inside as all rooms where packed full of stuff the small house itself had been turned upside down either by looters or kids, but either way the good stuff remained, an old gasmask with box was outside under some bits and buckets, inside a beautiful piano sits hardly untouched, while you looked around you soon noticed alot more than what you first would upon entering. As i said hardly any full room shots, but hopefully what I have is enough to show an insight into this place. (address an so fourth been edited). Enjoy Thank you for looking
  23. Not my usual way to spend 30mins or so, but the place seemed curious when passing, so popping inside finding odd trinkets and going up the stairs, it soon began to feel like it could cave in, inside is all light painted which showed a wall mural, (minus light through doors/ceiling) outside a wonderful RV its up for sale so anyone wanting a splore vehicle this is right up the alley even has on-board camera No other information on this one sadly but not bad for what it is. Thanks for looking
  24. Opening in May 1939, Royal Air Force West Raynham was used by RAF Bomber Command during the Second World War. RAF West Raynham was an expansion scheme airfield with a grass landing strip and a Fort-type lookout tower. The lookout tower was replaced with a “Control Tower for Very Heavy Bomber Stations†later in the war. The headquarters and accommodation blocks were built to the west of the landing area and bomb stores to the south-east. In 1943 two concrete runways were built to replace the grass landing strip. One runway was 1.8km and the other 1.3km in length. The housing on the base was also expanded at the same time, providing accommodation for 2,456 men and 658 women. The station had a Rapier missile training dome, in which a 180 degree simulation could be projected onto the inside of the dome to simulate flight in a fighter jet. Many of the facilities were similar to those provided by the stations sister base RAF Kirton in Lindsey in Lincolnshire, including the training dome. The station closed in 1994 but was retained as a strategic resrve. The site laid derelict until the RAF decided it was surplus to requirements in 2006 and was sold to developers in 2007. Part of the site has been used as a new housing estate, and the land around the main runway is now a solar farm. The Airmen's Restaurant Officers Mess Station HQ Accommodation Blocks Medical Block Sports Hall Control Tower Hangers and Rapier Dome The hangers are now in use by private businesses so we didn't go inside them. Water Tower
  25. This was another of those fab days out, Just driving around and checking out stuff I had been wanting to see for a while that had popped up online. So myself Zyge, littlebear and Spark headed out for the day to avoid massive nettles and horsefly bites..... Something that I did not manage all to well 1st stop was a area called Hillbilly farm, this was linked to RAF Fersfield and the land incorporates some of the old nissen huts and a few other out buildings as well. Inside some of these buildings you will see there are all sorts of vehicles and other bits of junk, most of what nature has now reclaimed. There is not a lot of history on the farm itself other than the farmer did not want to sell it off as he was worried about being ripped of, how true this is I am not sure, but the airfield history I feel is important as most of what there is to see incorporates the building that are there. The runway is now gone as are all airfield building that we looked for, but you can still drive around the taxi way if you wish Built in 1943/1944, the airfield was originally a satellite of RAF Knettishall. It was constructed to Class A bomber specifications, with a main 6,000 ft (1,800 m) runway (08/26), and two secondary runways (02/20, 14/32) of 4,200 ft (1,300 m). Accommodation for about 2,000 personnel were in Nissen huts along with an operations block and two T-2 hangars. The facility was originally named Winfarthing when it was allocated to the United States Army Air Forces in 1942. Assigned to the VIII Bomber Command, it was renamed Fersfield when used by the Americans. Winfarthing was assigned USAAF station number 140; Fersfield was reassigned 554. Not used by the USAAF, it was transferred to the United States Navy for operational use. The airfield is most notable as the operational airfield for Operation Aphrodite, a secret plan for remote controlled Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress bombers (redesignated as BQ-7s) to be used against German V-1 flying bomb sites, submarine pens, or deep fortifications that had resisted conventional bombing 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
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