Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Derelict'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • General Discussion & Forum information
    • Forum information
    • Just take a moment & say Hi
    • General Discussion
  • Exploration Forums
    • Military Sites
    • Industrial Locations
    • Hospitals & Asylums
    • Public buildings, Education & Leisure
    • Underground Explores
    • High Places
    • Manors, Mansions & Residential
    • Religious Sites
    • Anything Else
  • Other Forums
    • Video Reports
    • Short Reports
    • Themed Threads

Categories

  • About the Forum
  • Urban Exploring information
  • Photography and camera advice
  • Technical Help

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website URL


Location


Interests

Found 49 results

  1. On the outskirts of Fishburn lies the derelict Winterton hospital. Winterton hospital used to be very big however most of its buildings were demolished and this part is the only building that remains of it. All of the windows are boarded up however when we got there it looked like someone had pulled the entire doorway off causing the whole thing to open making an entry so easy. Inside the building is in terrible condition, (similar to St. peter's) with collapsed floors, wallpaper peeling, water damage etc. We also didn't realise at the time that the building had asbestos but luckily we had masks so make sure to bring one if you're planning on going inside. We were unable to access the top floor due to the floor being so bad so we only got photos from the corridor as we came up the stairs. That all being said, winterton hospital does have a lot of history and it is a shame to see it left in such a poor state.
  2. On the outskirts of Middlesbrough there is an abandoned nursing home in a housing estate. The building was originally constructed in 1825 however it was not fully built until 1858. The use was originally a house however in the 1980s the owner sold the house and converted it into a nursing home. The home closed down in 2005 and has been empty since. Recent arson attempts have occurred at Normanby Hall and the place is well secure and hidden from the housing estate. All of the gardens and road to it are overgrown and makes it almost impossible to even know it is still there! The building is in derelict condition and there are currently no plans as of demolition or refurbishment, which is quite sad considering this is a spectacular looking house. anyway here are the photos, enjoy!
  3. This place is not too far from where I live. i have heard all about it's history and decided to have a look inside and get some photos of the building itself. The place is an absolute death trap, ceiling's fallen through, water ingress all over etc. It started early life in 1900 as a roman catholic orphanage until 1940 when it became an approved borstal until 1984. During this period there has been reports of physical and sexual abuse which happened at St. Peter's over the years. in 1984 the school closed down and was sold for £130,000. The buyers bought the buildings and converted the main building into a nursing home for the elderly. Again this was in operation until closure in march 1999. The main building was demolished in 2016 due to a massive 9 hour fire and is only the gymnasium and the reception building that remain on the premises. As you can see in the photos the building is severely damaged due to dampness and vandalism.
  4. Just off the A66 in Darlington, there is an abandoned farm called Little Burdon farm, it has been derelict for at least a decade. It consists of different buildings being from a farmhouse to old barns or stables. There's really two farmhouses, a red brick one and a more modern white house. It also looks like some refurbishment/demolition has taken place but again has been held off or abandoned. The farm was built around the 1830s and is grade 2 listed. There is no security here and is easy to get into all of the buildings. That being said the buildings are indeed derelict so some floors are dangerous and can't be accessed. In the white house building, part of the upstairs floor has been removed due to the refurbishment works but has been left standing as it is. It also looks like the rooms have been stripped out and all electrics and gas pipes have been removed.
  5. Smudges 1st ever photographic report - may 2018 Smudges has been known by numerous other names over the years from The Crofters Arms Hotel to McGees to Moghuls Palace but has always retained it's charm and character. A true time capsule rotting away in the heart of Bolton. Featuring some stunning hand-carved bars and one of two of this type of revolving doors that exist the other located in a grand hotel in London. The Urban Collective We Film It... Thank you for checking out my pics guys! Clarky The Urban Collective We Film It...
  6. A stunning grade two listed gem decaying right on the high street. Featuring the stunning architecture of Alfred Waterhouse who also designed Strangeways prison the Manchester town hall. The main building has been used for many different purposes over the years as well as Prudential themselves. And the basement club was once a Berni inns restaurant (Cafe Monico) a chain that served a post-war British public such delight's as sherry schooners steak and chips and black forest gateau as well as becoming a dance club in the 90's. We had a wonderful two hours in this grade two listed time capsule. Hope you guys enjoy the pics as much as we enjoyed the explore. Thanks for any feedback The Urban Collective We Film It...
  7. Visited on a freezing cold snowy Sunday morning with Scrappy NW and Katy. Long overdue visit this one but access isn't always possible. Inside its dark and decrepit yet enough remains to get an idea of how it looked when it was in full flow. The stage area was a no go as it has now collapsed. Structuraly it was fairly sound even in the upper areas. Things were made to last in 1894 obviously. Theatres have so much history and are always wonderful places to explore and photograph even if their condition is so poor. On with some history. I'm sure you have all read the history of this pace in other reports but i'll put a brief summary here: The Burnley Empire Theatre has a profoundly poignant history that starts in the 19th Century when it was first designed by GB Rawcliffe in 1894. Owned and managed by WC Horner, it was a theatre of high regard and continued to such following works in 1911, when the auditorium was redesigned by Bertie Crewe, well respected architect, much of whose work is no longer standing – pulled down to make way for housing, shops or other amenities, or victims of the war that destroyed so many beautiful buildings. The interior boasts ‘two slightly curved wide and deep balconies, terminating in superimposed stage boxes framed between massive Corinthian columns supporting a deep cornice. Segmental-arched proscenium, with richly decorated spandrels and heraldic cartouche. Side walls feature plaster panels, pilasters and drops. Flat, panelled ceiling with circular centre panel and central sun burner. Restrained heraldic and Greek plasterwork on balcony and box fronts’ . The Theatre opened on Monday the 29th of October 1894 with a variety show and could originally seat 1,935 people. During its time as a theatrical venue, Charlie Chaplin, Margot Fonteyn and Gracie Fields are just a few of the names to have appeared on the now broken stage. In 1938 The Theatre was converted for cinema use by the Architects Lewis and Company of Liverpool, and the seating capacity was reduced to 1,808 in the process. Like so many other Theatres around the Country the Empire was eventually converted for Bingo use in 1970 but even this ceased in 1995 and the Theatre, despite being a Grade II Listed building, has been empty ever since and is in serious decline, and listed as one of the Theatres Trust's buildings at risk. On with the pics
  8. I don´t know why, but for me there´s something special about abandoned swimming pools. That´s why I thought this might be a nice new topic. 1 2 3 4 5
  9. Hey, guys here's my video report on the #post-apocalyptic #Camelot #ThemePark. I've already made a photographic report with a full history etc so I won't bore you with that here as it is featured in the footage. Thanks for any feedback guys take it, easy man. PEACE The Urban Collective We Film It...
  10. Hey, guys, we are the Urban Collective and we don't want you to think we're here for views or to sell teeshirts like most of the tripe you see on YouTube (No disrespect intended)... We actually have a genuine new found passion for #UrbanExploration and have been constantly uploading Photographic and video reports to @obliviontate recently and will continue to do so. We'd just like take a moment to share our new trailer for the channel for a bit of feedback and just to let you guys know we exist. We're always paying attention to what others do, and give good positive feedback on posts across the forum and the web. We adhere to the rules Urban Exploring and would just like to continue to share our experiences photos videos etc with like minded people within an awesome community. We are just that face in the crowd watching as the high streets dwindle and the corporations take over. We are The Urban Collective We Film It... By the way guys, i hope I posted this in the right place? Sorry if I didn't I didn't want to post it in the videos bit because it is not a report cheers guy's.
  11. The Derelict Toilet. AKA the Lavatory, Loo, WC, Crapper, Khazi, Bog, Dunny, Shithouse, John, Cack-Laboratory, Latrine, Little boys room, Ivory throne. An obsession I didn't realise I had until I was reviewing my pictures after visiting St. Johns and counted 33 images of toilets in various shapes, sizes, and stages of decay. I reviewed photos from previous explores and the toilet image content ratio was hovering at around 15-20%. Like watching the first series of breaking bad in two evenings, or smoking crack, the addiction had crept up on me and by this time it was too late, I was hooked... From that day forth, I can't help myself and actively seek out these attractive ceramic recepticles. Sometimes I find a lonely toilet, tucked away in an abandoned asylum and I've been overheard saying things like "there there" and "It's OK daddy's here". It has taken a long time to sift through 1000's of photographs in my dropbox but I'd like to share some of these with you. My high points have included the multitude of toilets at Severalls and St. Johns, Low points being only able to find one at Sleaford Bass Maltings and worse still, NONE at Wolverton Works. Please share your own toilet finds below, I'd love to see them The History We each spend three years of our lives on the toilet. A toilet is a plumbing fixture used for defecation, urination, and barfication. Modern toilets consist of a bowl fitted with a hinged seat and are connected to a waste pipe where waste is flushed. The Englishman with the unfortunate surname, Thomas Crapper, often gets credit for inventing the flushing toilet, and he undoubtedly was a major player in its development. His valve-and-siphon design was patented in 1891, and his company manufactured water closets that found wide acceptance all over England. In the decades preceding World War I his toilets imprinted with “T. Crapper Brass & Co., Ltd." inspired a generation of young American soldiers stationed in England during World War I, and they returned to America with a new slang term for the relatively new household fixture. Here are some of my favourite Ivory delights... Where it all began... St.John's Asylum, Lincolnshire. 1. 2. 3. 4,5,6. Severalls Hospital, Colchester. 7. 8. 9. 10. A sink photobombing my toilet shot. 11. It all became to much and she took her own life, if only i'd got there sooner 12,13(identical twin sisters),14. Ferdowse Clinic AKA Heckington Manor, Lincolnshire 15. 16. Green Peek-A-Loo 17. "The waffler" (Not strictly a shitter, but i like its body) George Dyke Forgemasters, Willenhall 18. A bit young for my liking but attractive nonetheless. Sleaford Bass Maltings, Lincolnshire. 19. Just me and her.. Anonymous Place 20. Wigston Leisure Centre, Leicestershire. (visited here the day before it got torched) 21. Intrigued by this half-toilet half-human hybrid 22. Unfortunately passed away due to smoke inhalation in a recent fire. RIP. Rauceby Asylum, Sleaford, Lincolnshire. 23. "The Cross-Trainers" Derby Royal Infirmary, Derpyshire. 24. 25. Toilet action selfie Nocton Hall and RAF Hospital 26. Old and single The RAF Binbrook Toilet Massacre, Lincolnshire 27. I have several thousand more toilet shots stored away in a special place on my laptop, but they're for me... As always, cheers for looking and feedback always welcome and appreciated peeps. Good to be back in the game again after a bit of a break! Now show me yours!!
  12. Explored a long road and found a house that was abandoned, some evidence of vandalism, not the most interesting of building but the way it has naturally fallen is quite beautiful
  13. History : Casement Park (Irish: Páirc Mhic Asmaint) is the principal Gaelic Athletic Association stadium in Belfast, Northern Ireland, home to the Antrim football and hurling teams. Located on the Andersonstown Road in the west of the city, and named after the Republican revolutionary Sir Roger Casement (1864-1916), the ground has a capacity of 32,600.[1] Casement Park, one of the largest stadia in Ulster, opened in June 1953, with Armagh Harps defeating St John’s of Antrim in the final of the inaugural Ulster Senior Club Football Championship.[2] The newly opened Casement Park hosted the Ulster Championship final less than a month later, which saw Armagh overcome reigning All-Ireland champions Cavan. In all, Casement Park has hosted eight Ulster football finals. However, the Antrim ground has not held the provincial showpiece since 1971, with St. Tiernach's Park in Clones hosting the final every year since except between 2004 and 2006 when it was moved to Croke Park such was the demand for tickets. A major facelift of the stadium took place in 2000, a move which saw more championship games played at Casement Park. In 2006, floodlights were added which allowed hurling and football to be played in the evening. In 2006, proposals were raised to build a new multi-purpose stadium on the site of the old Maze prison near Lisburn, which was intended to host association football, rugby union and Gaelic games. However, opposition to the idea led to it being dropped in favour of a new venue in the Sydenham area of East Belfast. This led to Ulster GAA, which was one of the partners in the Maze project, to pull out in favour of remaining at Casement Park.[3] In 2011, the Northern Ireland Executive announced that it had granted £138m for various stadium redevelopment projects throughout Northern Ireland. Ulster GAA would receive £61.4m of this, which was to be used to redevelop Casement Park into a 40,000 all-seated stadium with £15 million of partnership investment from the Central Council of the GAA, making it the largest stadium in Ulster.[4] In early 2012 it was announced that the redevelopment work would start at the end of 2013 with a view to having the new stadium open by September 2015. It was expected that, after its completion, Ulster GAA would move its headquarters from St Tiernach's Park in Clones to Casement Park,[5] which would then have a seating capacity of about 40,000.[6] In December 2014 the granting of planning permission for the redevelopment of Casement Park was ruled unlawful. On 28 April 2016 the team behind the Casement Park redevelopment proposals launched a consultation process in an effort to see what the general public's views are. On the 14th November 2016 Casement Park was officially included as part of Ireland's 2023 Rugby World Cup bid. 2006 controversy A decision in 2006 by the Antrim County Board to permit the use of Casement Park to host a Republican rally in commemoration of the deaths of Provisional IRA and INLAprisoners in the 1981 hunger strike drew criticisms from unionists. Visited in late 2015, casement lies the same today although work on redevelopment is expected to start very soon. knowing the social club was still in use allowed access to part of the ground and the rest i just had to blagg.
  14. One of the most iconic houses in the portuguese urbex panorama in one of my first explorations with my 60D. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20
  15. Abandoned and decayed. One of the most interesting place I've visited with exciting building structure, combined with decaying details. Shame about the place is about to get knocked down. An experience to remember. https://www.facebook.com/manny.teh/media_set?set=a.1945695755495938.1073741854.100001665983033&type=3&pnref=story
  16. Hello, not sure on the full history of the place. I have found a little bit of information from Google. Great little house with a shop at the front. Loads of things left inside. The Butcher’s Home – Belgium An abandoned butchers house in Belgium. There lived a family of 10 people! a father and a mother and 4 boys and 4 girls. The home was abandoned in 1994 and left ever since! Thanks for looking!
  17. Hey Guys Thought I would share a video from an outing to Redhill, Enjoy!
  18. Shot a few years ago before all the vandalism. No edits just a walk around. Was such a lovely place then. I believe restoration work is now well ongoing. This is great to hear. Thanks for looking I got plenty more films in the pipeline.
  19. A very interesting house but unfortunately in very bad shape. 1 2 3 4 5
  20. Abandoned Paper Mill, UK Visited with: Alex Visit Date: April 2015 Please Note: Entry is always through an open access point and not by forcing our way in….. We are explorers, not vandals. My Visit I had been wanting to visit the mill for some time, however, I kept pushing this one aside for a rainy day. Eventually myself & Alex decided it was time.... This would be my first visit and Alex's second. So, early on a soggy, wet, rainy and very windy April morning we set off to what would turn out to be one of the best & most enjoyable explores I have been on. The entry to the mill I knew was going to be tricky because Alex had told me the way in when planning the visit. Lots of climbing was needed and the main thing I was thinking was do not rush and avoid any areas that look a little sketchy. It worked and we both made it in without any issues. Now, I knew the mill was a large site after seeing many other photos from people who had been here and within a few minutes of dropping in the scale of this place became a reality! I am no expert in the process of making paper so I will only state what I have read as to what the machinery was used for. I think the yellow machines in this photo fed the pipes in the following photos. I spent a good amount of time in this room due to all the pipework shooting off in different directions. I love lines and angles and this area had plenty to go at. From what I have read the pipes were for feeding pulp into machines on a lower floor. It makes sense as you can see the pipes attached to the ceiling feeding the pipes on the other side of the room that dissapear into the floor. The mill has plenty of large rooms that could have been used for many things such as storage & packaging. Here are a few photos of these spaces. It is always good to get a feel for the people who worked in these places and when you find the brew / changing rooms it kind of brings you back to reality. People once worked here, this was their income for paying the bills, but sadly no more. The different characters that would have been in these rooms over the years and the stories they have told. Does anyone think that this was the male changing room! And no, not because it is messy.... Situated in the middle of the main working areas we found the brew room which consisted of two floors for people to sit and relax whilst on their breaks. A shower room and another changing room are situated off to the side but I never took a photo, why I hear you ask... because my brain gave out on me and I forgot. I remember thinking that it must have been very noisy in here due to the fact that it is surrounded on all sides by large machinery. All I know about these machines is that they were used for rolling the paper. The room is crammed from wall to wall with machinery with only a central isle to walk down. Do you remember earlier in the report that I said the pulp was fed through the pipes and down to machines on a lower floor? Well these are the machines that was fed the pulp. What happened to the pulp at this stage I have absolutely no idea. The room was very dark (and hard to photograph) and I remember when entering feeling like I had been taken back in time to the industrial revolution. Lots of metal on show, dirt, pipes & strange looking machines it was very surreal. I can imagine this area being very hot and noisy with lots of sweaty dirty workers going about their tasks. As well as all the machines there was also a good amount of office space here. Most was very badly decayed or trashed but I did find this room rather interesting. Ok so back to the working areas... This is the largest area we came across on the visit, lots of different areas within one floor all working together in what you could call a production line. Again I got a surreal feeling here due to the fact that at one time this place would have been bustling with people and noise. Now though, nothing, nothing other than the sounds of our footsteps and the rain hitting the roof. Tucked away in the corner of this area we found three forklifts parked up. They look in very good working order and I am sure if you had the keys they would start up. The final photo is of an area where one of the end results is stacked up on pallets and either moved to storage or loaded onto wagons. There is still some paper stacked on pallets that will have come down the conveyors as you can see in the photo. Behind me is two very large shutter doors that open to a loading area. More images available on flickr The images above are just a small selection of the images I have edited. I will be adding lots more photos of Lotus Hall aka Cuckoo Hall on my Flickr page which can be found here, https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Final thoughts To me having a fantastic location to see is only 50% of what makes a good trip the other is great company and this day had both, I loved every minute we spent here. There was so much to see and with every room being different it allowed your mind to try and figure out and imagine what the area was used for and the communal areas made you think of the people who worked here..... To me that is what exploring is all about! With the size of this place I am sure myself & Alex will have missed some areas and I would love to revisit here at some point. The mill instantly became one of my favorite locations that I have been lucky enough to see and rightly so. Finally, thanks to my good Friend Alex for the company as always. Thanks for reading, Dugie
  21. This one has been on the back burner of my list of things to do, but with its comparatively remote location (over 100 miles from my house) I have finally got round to having a look whilst on a huge roadtrip to visit my mate in Nowheresville, Lincolnshire. This place has been closed aprox 30 years, and is rare in that the roof is in good condition, but is no longer used. Visited on my own, on a fine spring day earlier this year. thanks for looking
  22. Unsure what I should really name this? An abandoned dairy farm, missing that red dress (which was more pink) and some large amounts of decay in rooms... A lovely afternoon spent walking around, admiring the decay and bits an bobs that laid scattered about, certainly worth your time still and quite frankly seems like locals have given up asking questions why you walk down a lane with a camera an tripod, especially after explaining once before we dont get nice fields in kent like these ones here... Walking around inside with the wind blowing through the whole place was rather cool, doors slamming and the curtains blowing about made for some interesting pictures. Many people know most of this places history after it splashed in papers and its been done a fair amount. IMGP0772 IMGP0642 IMGP0648 IMGP0651 IMGP0655 IMGP0656 IMGP0665 IMGP0668 IMGP0682 IMGP0687 IMGP0690 IMGP0698 IMGP0699 IMGP0703 IMGP0712 IMGP0713 IMGP0716 IMGP0741 IMGP0744 IMGP0748 Cheers for looking everyone!
  23. Been awhile since I posted on here, so thought I would put a few places up I had been to earlier this year and likewise. A rural cottage, once home to a hoarder, lots to see an loads to photograph, could of spent ages in here, but more gems like this awaited us on the trip. Upstairs was packed full of old magazines and trinkets almost so the doors would not open fully! a proper hoarder with an eye for musical instruments... IMGP0786 IMGP0888 IMGP0917 IMGP08444 IMGP0881 IMGP0878 IMGP0873 IMGP0869 IMGP0865 IMGP0846 IMGP0892 IMGP0840 IMGP0837 IMGP0836 IMGP0830 IMGP0822 IMGP0802 Thanks for looking folks, hope you enjoyed her as I did.
  24. Been a while since I last got round to uploading a set and doing a report on here, so a bit rusty, I present to you The Fly Agaric Cottage. Having a crazy alien come spend a couple days at my federation space shuttle deployment centre. After an initial pleasantries, an agreement between the grizzly bearded mongrel and the alien invader was set in place to visit a couple of Scotland's finest well protected and preserved residential dwellings. Prior to departure for the fine examples of derp dwellings, a night of festivities had to be conducted. After several other worldy concoctions, the beer googles and cider visor was firmly in place and a solid nights slumber ended a night of much laughter and race relations between the intrepid explorers. The time came for departure and a wild space race ensued with meteoroid dodging and asteroid belt of razor edged mountainous rocks, the race was an impending carnage or tragedy waiting to happen, until full reverse thrust was applied and grizzly mongrel and crazy alien found themselves in a strange new world. Climbing the gates of Black Cow Gate, the adventurers saw mystical erratically wandering clouds in the distance, as they grew closer, black snarling faces grew upon them, the adventurers presence were obviously not welcome in this new world. "We must move forward" shouted the grizzly mongrel, "follow the Ent like creatures" screamed the alien. The ent like creatures swayed in the wind offering protection from the snarling fluffy clouds. Finally the adventures reached civilisation... Entering the imposing castle, the adventurers were relieved to find they had in-fact found safety. It was time for the weary travelers to return to the shuttle and head off at warp speed to a new world, they ran from the castle, hurrying past the fluffy clouds who had gathered menacingly at the door, their snaring faces foaming at the mouth!! Finally they made it back to the shuttle, unscathed, but the did learn a lesson that day! Don't mess with the Fly Agaric! Stussy & Oldskool
  25. Second of three sites on another amusing day out with KM Punk & Frizman, including a fun afternoon around Upwood’s famous tanks. This site has been off the radar for a few years, but has not been developed as yet. The site is huge (100 acres), and has over 70 buildings. The main building was sadly not accessible, and heavily fortified with CCTV, PIRs, loud speakers, brambles, pillboxes & laser cannons. Not much history on this one apart from it is an ex government animal testing facility, and has been derelict for a while. Thanks to Frizman for finding this one. thanks for looking
×