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  1. "Wallpaper paper peeling heaven" History Eastmoor Secure Unit for Children, located near the small village of Adel in Leeds West Yorkshire opened in 1857 as the Leeds Reformatory for Boys by the Leeds Society for the Reformation of Juvenile Offenders, on a site deliberately chosen to be removed from the temptations of the city. Reformatories were distinguished from Industrial Schools by taking young people who had actually committed offences such as begging, wandering, consorting with thieves and prostitution, opposed to those who were merely destitute or neglected and in danger of falling into crime. There were around 50 boys at the school in 1858. The south-east range and headmaster’s house was added in 1860, when the attic floor of the initial range was converted to dormitories. The workshops of the north-east range, built by the boys in 1859, were rebuilt in 1881 after a fire, and a separate chapel to the south was added in 1882, The swimming pool beyond the north-west range was added in 1887 and roofed in 1896. A boiler room between the north-west range and the pool was inserted in 1899 to heat the pool. It was used by community groups as well as inmates, and swimming and life-saving were taught. (This swimming pool is now one of the oldest in the country.) The buildings continued in use as an approved school named Eastmoor School from 1933 and then a community home when it was taken over by Leeds CC on 1st April 1973. It was then known as Eastmoor CHE, that is Community Home with Education. A number of separate houses were constructed around the core site from the 1950s onwards, but there has been little change to the buildings externally. In 1993 a secure unit for young offenders was built on part of the site, the Eastmoor approved school which housed some of the countries most dangerous child criminals including one of the Bulger Killers, Jon Venables. The site was leased to Leeds Metropolitan University from the late 1990s when the surrounding houses were used for student accommodation who left when a new campus opened in Headingley in 2003. It has been unused since c2004 and has been marketed for housing development. Explore Little hard to find this one and is some distance from the centre. Having trailed through woodland, through peoples back gardens (sorry) and then finally walking a further distance we came across this desolate hospital. The x-hospital sits next to a brand new secure unit for children, which gives the place a surreal feel. The building is in an extremely poor condition most of the upper floorS have gaping holes through to the lower floors and there is a high presence of asbestos. In the courtyard someone as gone to the trouble to spell out 'HELL IS PCP' using huge stones that have been piled in the courtyard, guessing building works commenced at some point. Theres a lot of atmosphere in the building and a few times we were sure there were others camping around the building. Worth an explore just watch the floors and the local addicts... oh and there a bar in the building (unfortunately not selling beverages) most probably installed for the students. Pics 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. LE FIN
  2. History Officially opened by the Earl of Scarborough in 1957, it was built the year before for £350,000 as headquarters for Leeds chemicals and dyestuffs firm Brotherton and Co and was at the heart of a new business area at the Westgate end of The Headrow. It was named in recognition of the famous Leeds city benefactor family, after the Brotherton Library and Collection at Leeds University, the Charles Brotherton engineering and chemical laboratory, the Brotherton Wing at the Leeds General Infirmary and the Brotherton Charity Trust. It was dubbed as the design of the future with the “latest external and internal structural techniques, automatic ventilation and ceiling heating”. Its ceilings were reported to be “acoustically perfect”, and its floors covered in highly-polished parquet. It was in 1965 – long before the merging of local police forces and the establishment of the current West Yorkshire force, that the old Leeds City Police took over part of the building and ultimately established its administrative headquarters there. In addition to the then Chief Constable and his Assistant Chief, numerous other police departments have been based at Brotherton House over the decades including senior CID, Special Branch, Fraud Squad, Regional Crime Squad, Firearms Registry, Aliens Department, Force Prosecutions, Special Constabulary, Training, Photographic and Fingerprint departments, the then so-called Policewomen’s Department, Pay and Accounts. Most notable investigations to have been carried out at Brotherton house was the notorious "Ripper squad" which was applied to a group of investigators and was the term used by the media for the investigation into the Yorkshire Ripper murders. Including George Oldfield the man in charge of the investigation. Today, the building – which has largely been vacated – overlooks the Leeds Inner Ring Road and is described by its agents as a “substantial high-profile office building with a significant presence.” Explore A day out in Leeds, driving on the ring road I noticed a building covered in green fabric... on closer inspection we found out by locals telling us that the building was abandon. Mostly the building is in good condition with a large amount of original features untouched.. the main hall is really something with original parquet flooring and a grand stair case leading into the main building. Corridors lead to open staircases on both sides of the building which offer access to the buildings six floors including rooftop. Pics 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. and 12 13. 14. 15. 16. and 17. LE FIN
  3. Went out for a day trip of exploring in Leeds with @plod. We had Opal 3 on our list but once we arrived in Leeds we already noticed there were people on the roof so we were unsure of whether we'd get a chance to get up there. We did some explores in the area to pass the time then eventually made our way to Opal 3. We headed to the roof anyway despite seeing what we first thought were builders, but it turned out there was actually an abseiling event going on so I thought why not. I'm so pleased I had the opportunity to have this experience, and I'd say it was pretty decent timing Opal 3 is a 25 storey building which serves as student accommodation for 542 students. It is the 3rd tallest building in Leeds after Bridgewater place and the Plaza Tower.
  4. The former British Gas building was built in the 1960's and at 147ft is the 21st tallest building in Leeds. Originally to be demolished, this building currently has plans of being converted into a hotel designed by Simpson Haugh and partners. The podium building will also be extended and raised to four storeys along its full length, and work is now progressing on the demolition phase. I was with @plod and another user from 28DL when I explored this in June but I have since come back a few times and built up a series of photos taken from late afternoon through to the night. Pretty cool place this, the views are amazing. It's definitely worth the huge trek up those stairs As I still currently use a bridge camera, not all of my pictures turned out all that good due to photographing in unfavorable conditions for the most part but I wanted to show them anyway.
  5. History Bramham House was originally built as a family home in 1806. It was later purchased by the West Riding County Council Children's Department in approximately 1947, who converted it into an orphanage for neglected and homeless children. 35 children were being looked after at the orphanage by 1970, however in 1974, Leeds City Council took over the running of the home which resulted in a change of the admission policy, which subsequently caused many issues. The house shut in the 1980's, and the children moved to a home in Wetherby, which has since been demolished. This building has been categorised as being at risk, and is capable of re-use. The Explore I came here with @Buffalo, as a last minute trip to Tadcaster. The place was quite far gone and it looked fairly trashed but it was quite an interesting building to look at. We even bumped into some friendly chavs trying to find a way into the building!
  6. Gledhow Grove, built in the 1820's was designed by architect John Clark in Greek Revival style. Chapel Allerton Hospital was opened in may 1927 by HRH Princess Mary, It was run by the Ministry of Pensions and cost £130,000. It replaced the old military hospital at Becketts Park in Leeds, catering for patients who had been injured in the Great War, specializing in the fitting of appliances and false limbs to war veterans. The hospital closed in 1994, the old hospital buildings were demolished and the Grade II listed mansion has been left derelict with new housing built in the grounds. In early 2008, filing cabinets containing patients' details were found inside the basement of the hospital after it had already been sold on. As most of this place has already been converted I only got to explore the mansion part of it. What's unique about this building is how different the layout is to your average hospital, and it still had lots of character despite being so wrecked. Some of the floors that we saw above had completely fallen through with the entire carpet hanging down, probably one of the most far-gone places I've seen.
  7. I went on a trip to Tadcaster with @Buffalo we bumped into this car wash on the way. We decided it was worth a quick visit as I used to see it on the way to work. I was glad to finally satisfy my curiosity. There wasn't really much to the place but it was an interesting little explore.
  8. History High Royds Hospital (formerly known as the West Riding Pauper Lunatic Asylum) first opened on the 8th October 1888. The main purpose of the asylum was to contain and restrain mentally ill patients. People often spent decades imprisoned in the asylum, which was recognized in the High Royds Cemetery which stands as a testament to those who spent their last days there. People lived very repetitive and lonely lives in the asylum due to poor care and understanding of mental illness in the 19th century, and it was common for people to be admitted for minor mental illnesses, such as phobias, anxiety and learning disabilities. The asylum was given the name Menston Mental Hospital in the 1920's, (and eventually became High Royds Asylum in 1963), and cures for mental illness were considered as an alternative to simply storing patients. The use of shock therapy was introduced with the intention of putting patients into a relaxed mental state, however this resulted in many patients screaming in pain, and sometimes caused them to become unconscious. Lobotomy was also a popular treatment at High Royds around this time. The hospital was closed in 2003 because it had become outdated and unsuited to modern psychiatric practice. The site is now being redeveloped into a new village, and all that remains is the admin block, which is grade II listed. Some features of the hospital will remain, such as the clock tower and ballroom. I've been here a few times so the photos are from various trips. I only ever got to see the Admin block but it was worth it for the clock tower and ballroom which I'm glad they're keeping. Explored with @plod and a few others. Sadly this place is now a no-go, I think its safe to assume somebody had been caught by the residents which brought attention to the access point, as they always seem to have their eyes out. I'm glad I at least got to see the last little bit that was left while it still stands though.
  9. The History Clayton Hospital was opened in 1854; after Thomas Clayton, a former city mayor donated buildings to the Wakefield general dispensary, an organisation set up to provide healthcare for the poor. It provided much needed healthcare long before the NHS was formed. The hospital was later abandoned in 2012. Specialist eye services have moved from Clayton to the more modern Pinderfields Hospital and its sexual health services will be based at King Street Walk-in Centre. The Explore Explored with @plod and a member from 28. (shot out to the 3 kids we also met there ) It's a shame to see that the place is in such a state, I tried to make the best of it despite not having much battery power left in my camera from the previous explores of the day. The main building was pretty disorientating so I'm sure I missed some of it but I'm quite satisfied with what I did get to see, given how trashed the place is anyway. We were interested in finding the morgue and we managed to locate it but it was very well boarded up, and there is anti-climb paint covering the fences that surround it as our friend managed to find As we were searching for a way in to another building in the center of the site, the security guard showed up while @plod was down the tunnels looking for a way in from there. Security gave us 2 minutes to get him out before the police are called but plod had wandered so far in that he couldn't hear us calling him Luckily he showed up in time after no luck finding anything; the security guard wasn't happy but he gave us no trouble as he didn't really seem to know what he was doing.
  10. Hello all, Recently realised i never did anything with my High Royds Photos. You all know the history so i wont bore you with that... Heres how it all played out; How I got a restraining order from a building... Cast your mind back to February... 2 years since the last report on High Royds and as conversion was well underway everyone thought the place was gone. Until one dark cold night when myself Raz and Ant took a mosey on over to see what was left and we were amazed to find that the admin building and a ward near the back of the site hadn't been touched. SWEET! So we waited till the weekend, and we retruned with the cameras. We spent a good few hours roaming around having a laugh until whilst stood in one of the corridoors we hear voices... and the owners of said voices come around the corner in their high vis and read us our rights. Great we've been arrested.... After a while the dickhead who had arrested us realised we weren't actually doing anything wrong and he backed off, called off the dog unit and left the decent officers to deal with us. After convincing them we were only there to take pictures, the officers took us over to the housing develpment office to speak with the lady in the showroom. As we walked in there was a couple speaking with her about buying a house, she took one look at the police, then at us filthy and clearly being detained, and they left. Ooops. With the development lady in tow, we went into the show house where we were made to apologise to the lady. She then left us alone with the cops, who wrote out restraining orders for the lot of us and then one of them walked over the brightest white carpet ive ever seen in muddy boots. "Looks like your not the only ones getting their wrists slapped today" He said looking at what he'd done. So we and the police made a quick exit before we were caught. So in one day, we were arrested, ruined a carpet, and got banned from entering the premises until Feb 2016 Photos; I apologise for some of the above photos if they make your eyes bleed... This was when i still thought HDR was cool. Sins of my youth Thanks for looking
  11. 2nd of 4 visits on Sunday with 2 other people, was a tricky little access but worth it in the end. Bit of an empty shell now but still worth it. History - Mount St Mary's is one of the architectural treasures of the city of Leeds. It is a grade two listed building dating from 1853. The laying of the foundation stone was an act of faith in itself as the founders of the church, the missionary order of the Oblates of Mary Immaculate had little idea as to where the money was to be found to complete the building. The church stands high on the crest of Richmond Hill and can be seen from many parts of the city. The slope below the church had been known for hundreds of years as 'the Bank'. For many, Mount St Mary's is the Famine Church, the original chapel was established at a time when Ireland was only beginning to recover from the Great Hunger brought on by the failure of the potato crop in successive years from 1845 to 1851. Hundreds of families, many of them suffering from the effects of starvation and 'famine fever, found some in what became Mount St Mary's parish. The story of how the church came to be established in the first place, on the initiative of men from the neighbouring St Saviour's Anglican church who were received into the Roman Catholic Church is more than just a footnote in English Church history. These were the people who persuaded the Oblates of Mary Immaculate to establish a chapel in Richmond Street, the Bank. It is impossible to calculate the contribution that Mount St Mary's made in creating a community out of the mass of desperate refugees who found themselves living on the Bank or in other parts of the parish. It was not just the ministrations of the clergy that went to forge this new community. It was the work carried out in caring for the sick and the poor, the setting up of the schools and the orphanage. Most of the latter work being carried out by the Sisters of the Holy Family. One must not forget either, the sodalities and societies within the parish that did so much to bind the community together. Despite the widespread poverty and deprivation that persisted so long, it became a community with a strong identity and contributed so much to the development of the city of Leeds. (copied from another post) 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14 15:
  12. Ok wanted to see this for a while so at 2 am decided to go look. Visited with acid reflux even though he stayed in car has he was shattered and stranton. Explore. Ok work is well on way here with lots of the building ripped up and several outside buildings now rubble. But most was still here. Was a wonderful explore and had some really nice features. However due to time never got to see has much has i would have liked but hell atleast i saw what was left. The computer room with headphones is sadly gone also much of the other stuff is also gone. I was late to party on this . Nevermind was still worth the look. History. Leeds Girls' High School (LGHS) was an independent, selective, fee-paying school for girls aged 3–18 founded in 1876 in Headingley, Leeds, West Yorkshire, England. It merged with Leeds Grammar School in 2005 to form The Grammar School at Leeds. LGHS was founded in 1876, at a time when female education was limited but expanding. Frances Lupton and other members of the Ladies’ Honorary Council of the Yorkshire Board of Education decided that campaigning for access to the universities was of little use without better all-round education for girls, equivalent to what boys received at traditional academic grammar school. Established interests prevented the use of existing charitable funds, so Lupton and her colleagues created a new way forward: a joint stock company. The school motto was Age Quod Agis, which means "do what you do". While seemingly tautological at first glance, it is in fact a corruption of the Biblical exhortation, "whatsoever thy turn thy hand to, do it with all thy might". The pupils were divided into four houses, named after the four patron saints of the United Kingdom: Andrew, David, George and Patrick. Girls were placed into the houses that their families had been in before them. There were various house competitions throughout the year, mainly sports and arts orientated, the main one being the house music competition during the spring term. The school had three sections situated in the western suburbs of Headingley: Infant School (Rose Court): 3 to 7-year-olds Junior School (Ford House): 7 to 11-year-olds Senior School: 11 to 18-year-olds The Infant School (Rose Court) was situated on the large Senior School site on Headingley Lane, while the Junior School (Ford House) operated 1 mile (1.6 km) down the road in a converted mansion house. The Senior School building was built in the early 1900s, and efforts are currently being made to have the building listed. The fine oak wood panelling in the Assembly Hall detailed where Old Girls went to university on completion of their education at LGHS. The furniture within the Senior School Library was designed by Robert Thompson (The Mouseman), but was sold when the school moved to Alwoodley Gates (the Leeds Grammar School site). In 2004 LGHS was the highest performing school within the Leeds LEA area, achieving top results at both GCSE and A Level. In 2005 LGHS merged with Leeds Grammar School to form the Grammar School at Leeds (GSAL). The merged school administration took over LGHS in August 2005, however the schools did not physically merge until September 2008. At that time the Junior School (ages 7–11) and Senior School (ages 11–18) moved to Alwoodley Gates. Classes for girls and boys between the ages of 11 and 16 remain segregated, but all extracurricular activities are mixed. The Infant School moved to the Ford House building next to a new nursery school, currently operating as GSAL'S Rose Court Nursery and Pre-Prep. The school building was used as a filming location for the fictional St Matthews' Hospital in the new ITV medical drama Monroe, which was scheduled for broadcast in 2011. Pics: Fake lift lol Last of the computer desks Fellow explorers Guess some people are not fans of a certain other site or some of there people. And Acid couldn't give a fook lol. Would put a pic up but do-sent deserve a spot on my pics lol. But sure those who have been have seen the black board. But enjoy this pic instead. Ok hope you all enjoy sorry diden't get the door shot somehow we missed it has it was total darkness lol. Thanks for looking all
  13. History The land on which the arches now stand, including the River Aire that runs beneath part of the city, was originally occupied by peasant farmers. People had farmed this area as early as the 1086, when the region was known as Loidis in the Celtic Kingdom of Elmet. During these early years, a medieval dam was constructed in the river, to divert water to the manorial corn mill at Swinegate, on the orders of the Lord of the Manor, Ilbert de Lacy whose fortified manor stood on the site that is now occupied by the Scarborough Hotel. The original dam is still visible to this day. Construction of the Victorian Dark Arches began much later in 1866, when most of the small railway groups were merging into larger companies. By this time, Leeds prospered as a result of the woollen industry and the wider industrial revolution occurring across England at the time. In response to this a new station in Leeds city centre was required, so more passengers and goods would be able to move through the city. After the completion of the arches, which used over 18 million bricks, the station was built above, on the surface level. However, despite the completion of something that was indeed awe-inspiring, especially since nothing on this scale had ever been accomplished in this area before, the Chief constable of Leeds at the time, writing in 1892, filed a report requesting an urgent expansion of the police force because the Dark Arches attracted many sorts of idlers, criminals and loose women. Since the arches were constructed with walkways and passages, and a number of small businesses and workshops, not just the waterway, people were able to walk freely beneath the city of Leeds. It was well-known though that people should avoid these areas if they did not want to be beaten or robbed. By the 1990s, the entire development had been cleared of most of its former problems and it was considered and advertised as being Leeds’ ‘best kept secret’. The Granary Wharf shopping centre is located within and around the arches and several other small businesses and restaurants were located there, although a number of these have closed and been redeveloped into car parking spaces. While the Granary Wharf area was in financial decline for a number of years throughout the early 2000s, since 2009 the Wharf has been improved considerably. Our Version of Events It has been a wee while since all of us went off on an exploring trip together, so we decided to pile into a couple of cars and see where the road took us. The first point of call thereafter was Leeds, to visit the Dark Arches we’ve heard so much about. Unfortunately for us, it had been raining a lot in the days leading up to our visit, so when we first arrived to access the underground passages the water depth had surged quite considerably and the flow of the water was pretty dangerous to say the least. We did, however, manage to find a way inside the ‘non-public’ part of the Dark Arches and they were very different to how we first imagined they would be. They were, as we’d been told, ‘awe-inspiring’ and had to some extent a pleasant piratey underworld feel to them, but they were much shorter than we’d anticipated. On a more personal level, I was a little disappointed that we weren’t able to get the waders on to have a deeper gander inside the arches, but, in hindsight, if we had done that I think we would have been swept away by the torrent of water. Although we had considered getting the dinghy out, to raft our way down the river, we decided against it since we didn’t fancy getting caught paddling the open river in broad daylight on our first explore of the trip. Perhaps when winter comes though, a little revisit might be on the cards. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Meek-Kune-Do, Rizla Rider and Husky. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12:
  14. For around a year id been saying to myself i must do Masticator and Megatron but id never gotten around to it. However last month i got them both done with a little help from Raz, Jord & ACID- REFLUX. So we shall start in date order, with the Masticator. Bit of History; The Meanwood Beck (Masticator) is a stream in West Yorkshire, England, which flows through Adel, Meanwood and Sheepscar into the River Aire in central Leeds. The same watercourse has been referred to as Addle Beck, Carr Beck, Lady Beck, Mabgate Beck, Sheepscar Beck, Timble Beck or Wortley Beck. The beck was previously a source of water for the village of Headingley and two of its earliest bridges led straight to it. The beck carries a much reduced volume of water over recent years as water is collected instead into the many drains in the centre of one of Britain's largest cities. Meanwood Beck runs through Meanwood Park and Woodhouse Ridge. It provides water and drainage for Meanwood Valley Urban Farm. In the 16th to 18th centuries it provided power for corn mills. In the 19th century it supplied water for a chemical works and tanneries, one of which, Sugarwell Court, is now a university hall of residence. The Beck suffered a serious pollution incident on 29 March 1999 when an oil tank at the University of Leeds' Bodington Hall was overfilled and 10,000 litres of oil flowed into the beck. It is also a habitat for the indigenous European crayfish, which is currently threatened in the UK by a plague carried by the Signal crayfish introduced from America. As well as the crayfish there is also bull head fish present which can be found easily with a net and a pair of waders; they generally are located on the stream bed in the mud and silt. The Meanwood Valley Trail footpath follows the line of the beck for much of its course however once it flows underground things get very interesting. And on to the Megatron. Another lil bit of hist; “Deep underneath Sheffield City Centre – below Park Hill, the train station and Ponds Forge – three rivers meet in a Victorian-engineered subterranean cathedral, built to protect the city from devastating floods”. Megatron, as most people now know is a large underground storm drain, which was constructed in the mid-1800s. The land on which Sheffield Midland Station was built in 1870, alongside various cutlers and silversmiths, was originally marshy and insalubrious, owing to the Porter Brook and the River Sheaf which run through that part of the city, and for this reason it was prone to regular flooding. To create solid foundations both rivers were partially covered; these drains would then frequently flood after heavy rains, protecting the rest of the growing industrial city of Sheffield. The manipulation of the rivers also served to benefit various mills and steel factories which required large quantities of water to function. The tunnel system remained a hidden secret for many years; a mysterious rumour amongst the general public since only a few Yorkshire Water engineers ever went down there. In an effort to keep the rest of society out of the system the rumour was reportedly extended, to convince everyone that full respiratory equipment was required if anyone ever desired to enter into the depths. (History shamelessly stolen from Wildboyz - Hope you dont mind matey ) Explore; A very good weekend this was, Myself and Raz mooched down to Sheffield to meet a well known explorer and the king of sarcasm ACID- REFLUX. i must say after seeing him shoot down so many people in such epic ways over on 28DL i was very apprehensive about this meet but as it turns out there was nothing to be worried about in fact i can now actually use my camera so cheers for the help mate Spent a few hours down here whilst waiting for Wildboyz to finish work and then off to a pub in the Derbyshire Dales to meet the rest of the gang Heres some more from Le Megatron... ACID- REFLUX in action So this is normally where i put thanks for looking, feel free to like/comment, look at my page ect blah blah blah but today ill leave you with this; "Is the river really beautiful or is it just the gradient of the land?"
  15. -First Report- One of my latest explores from June. There's not a lot of information about this place that i could find. However on with the explore; Explored with a non-member, After talking to some people about access and details we were prepared and ready. Only to get there and be greeted with security on the gates. So after getting some food and a walk we came back to find the security had gone but only to find the access point mentioned had been blocked off. However, I don't give up that easy, so after some head scratching, grazes and climbing later, we were in. And it was worth the effort and time! Definitely need a re-visit to this place due to not getting round it all. But here's some of the shots that I did get. 1. The Blue Corridor. 2. The Show Must Not Go On. 3. Going Up. 4. 'Watch Your Step.' 5. 10 Flights Up. 6. To Smoke To Ashes. 7. Fire Bell. 8. Lunch Is Over. 9. Boiler Room. 10. Number 6. 11. To Higher Ground. 12. Going Higher? 13. The Skies The Limit 14. Cityscape. 15. Explore Done-Time To Take A Seat. If you've got this far, thanks for reading.
  16. So as you all now know, Network Rail were kind enough to give us a tour of the lower levels of the Train Station as we had failed numerous times to reach these areas via stealth. Explored with Raz & Jord Bit of History; Leeds railway station (also known as Leeds City railway station) is the mainline railway station serving the city centre of Leeds in West Yorkshire, England. It is the second busiest railway station in England outside of London. It is located on New Station Street to the south of City Square, at the bottom of Park Row, behind the landmark Queens Hotel; it is one of 19 stations managed by Network Rail. God knows what that is in the corner of this photo... Leeds is an important hub on the British rail network. The station is the terminus of the Leeds branch of the East Coast Main Line which provides high speed inter-city services to London and is an important stop on the CrossCountry network between Scotland, the Midlands and South West England connecting to major cities such as Birmingham, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Derby, Nottingham, Reading, Bristol, Exeter, Plymouth and Penzance. There are also regular inter-city services to major destinations throughout Northern England including Manchester, Liverpool, Newcastle and Sheffield. It is also the terminus for trains running on the scenic Settle to Carlisle line. Leeds is a major hub for local and regional destinations across Yorkshire such as to York, Scarborough, Hull, Doncaster and Sheffield. The station lies at the heart of the Metro commuter network for West Yorkshire providing services to Bradford, Wakefield, Dewsbury, Huddersfield and Halifax. With nearly 28 million passenger entries and exits between April 2013 and March 2014, Leeds is the busiest railway station in the North of England and the second-busiest railway station in the United Kingdom outside London, after Birmingham New Street. The Tour; Jordan had arranged the trip underneath the station with a contact of his in the weeks beforehand, and they had agreed to show us the old offices and workings under the station, and we hoped that the rumours of the old ststion beneath the current one were true. Here are a few pics of where we were taken. We went through restricted areas such as the building works for the new south side entrace, through the British Transport Police car park, and of course through the warren of tunnels and corridoors which make up the bowels of this impressive termini. At one point our guide led us through a series of doors and down a shady elevator into the car park of the Queens Hotel... a very familar smell of the Dark Arches reached out nostrils and we soon found ourselves under the arches which we had already explored many times; http://www.oblivionstate.com/forum/showthread.php/9335-Dark-Arches-Revisit-July-15-(More-Photos) At this point we were all looking at each other with a slight smirk and sort of acting all like "Yeah this is cool, never seen this before... oh wow i bet its impossible to get down here" - AWKWARD!!!! And on the way out we nipped through the British Transport Police offices and as it turnes out they have a very pleasing staircase! Throughout this entire trip even though i knew i had permission to be there, i was shatting myself everytime a member of Network Rail staff came across us after a couple of years of avoiding security forces and workers!! Old habits die hard! So i leave you with this question, there is a massive amount of evidence to suggest the existance of a railway station beneath the current known working station, and we were given full access to the lower levels but we were not shown this... Is there more? Thanks for looking
  17. Having stumbled across a report from a couple years back and after a little bit of research later that evening me and Matt had a short drive over to Leeds to check out the "LOL drain" It's not that long but does have some nice bits and having only been in meanwood beck and the tunnels under roundhay park it was nice to see a place where you could admire the brickwork without scraping your head along the roof! Looking towards the River Aire Once you reach the end of the first tunnel you are greeted by this junction This bit did split off into a few separate smaller parts but after matt had a look in one and came back out feeling light-headed and feeling sick we quickly got out of that part Under the black gate things at the junction it opens up for a short while then back into a nice curved part Couple from the walk back out Cheers for looking
  18. Hope this was noone we know trying the Dark Arches http://www.yorkshireeveningpost.co.uk/news/latest-news/top-stories/body-pulled-from-river-aire-in-leeds-city-centre-1-7375676
  19. Went back for another look and heres what i got!!
  20. So by now most of you have seen Raz's report, here my version of events Quick drive not so far from us and a walk through what i can only describe as a Jurrasic like British "rain forrest" by the side of the river Aire led us to a nice looking drain, it stank like hell and for a while im pretty much certain i was stood in raw sewage... great stuff Heres some photos; And to finish; a little light painting Cheers for looking
  21. Myself and Raz went down a cool drain in Leeds last night, read Raz's report here; http://www.oblivionstate.com/forum/showthread.php/9536-Knostrop-treatment-works-outlet-Leeds-July-2015?p=79018#post79018 Press HD - Little walk about Video doesnt do the smell justice I have enough photos for a report but ill save them for the near future Nice little mooch about and thanks for looking
  22. Explored with Raz & a non - member Bit of history to start; In 1864 it was proposed to build "New Station" in Leeds. Construction began in 1866 and the station was completed in 1869. The new station was built on arches which span the River Aire, Neville Street and Swinegate. The building of the station led to the creation of the 'Dark Arches' over Neville Street. Over 18 million bricks were used during their construction, breaking records at the time. Although the arches appear to be part of one single structure, closer inspection reveals that it is a series of independent viaducts two or four tracks wide. The Explore; After generally treking around Leeds looking for more rooftops we decided to have a walk down the Dark Arches and see what we could find, not expecting to be very successful how ever we were in luck! we found an access point, a quick look around and a short climb later we were in a drain Pretty cool explore really and i hope to return soon with waders so we can explore more. i doubt we even scratched the surface! Few more photos If you got this far, thanks for reading
  23. Hello all, Few pics from above leeds on roof tops/car parks Train leaving Leeds Station Cheers for looking
  24. Hello all, Leeds from above in various locations, styles and quality thanks to Facebook Enjoy!! Thanks for looking
  25. General Background; Ranking in as the third tallest building in Leeds at 25 floors tall or 269ft above Leeds city center. Situated above the Leeds First Direct Arena this building dominates the sky line. Completed in 2007 it now plays host to some 500 plus students studying at Leeds Uni. Photos; -Raz- photo Low quality phone image; If you made it this far, thanks for looking
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