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Found 4 results

  1. How to post a report using Flickr Flickr seems to change every time the wind changes direction so here's a quick guide on how to use it to post a report... Step 1 - Explore and take pictures Step 2 - Upload your chosen pictures to Flickr like this.. Step 3 - Once your images are successfully uploaded to flickr choose a category for the location that you have visited... Step 4 - Then "Start New Topic".. You will then see this screen... Step 5 - Now you are ready to add the image "links", known as "BBcodes", which allow your images to display correctly on forums.. Step 6 - Then click "select" followed by "view on photo page".. Now select "Share" shown below.. Step 7-13 - You will then see this screen... Just repeat those steps for each image until you're happy with your report and click "submit topic"! You can edit your report for 24 hours after posting to correct errors. If you notice a mistake outside of this window contact a moderator and they will happily rectify the problem for you
  2. History Thurleigh was built for RAF Bomber Command in 1941 by W & C French Ltd in 1941. On 7th September 1942 the 306th Group started to arrive; with some of their B17s flying in the following week. From October 1942, the 306th Group mounted a long and arduous offensive suffering many losses. The Group finally completed their long war on 19th April 1945 which was their 342nd mission; the second highest for any B17 Group. During its time at Thurleigh over 9,600 sorties had been flown with the loss of 171 aircraft in action and over 22,500 tons of bombs were dropped. In 1946 construction work began on the airfield to turn the site into what became known as the Royal Aeronautical Establishment, Bedford. The airfield was finally closed in 1997. (History borrowed from Nelly) The Explore Explored with Session9 and Hamtagger, this was the second site of the day. A long walk into the middle of nowhere - A load of sheep, a farmer cutting grass or crops and a large car graveyard was ahead of us before approaching the control tower area. I recently acquired a pair of mint condition WW2 binoculars and was dying to use them. This was their first explore, and funny enough they came in very handy for checking out the tower for entry points from miles away as well as potential onlookers, security patrols, etc. Upon arrival, it was sealed pretty tight and entry seemed unlikely at first. After a bit of rummaging around amongst a load of unrelated rubbish outside, we used something makeshift along with a leap of faith to shoehorn ourselves inside. Looks like this place has been kept relatively free from youth vandalism, many windows and doors were still intact and the place lacked usual tagging normally found more inner city. Most of the rooms have weathered well over the past 18 years, with algae and moss growing on various parts of the walls. The contrast of green growth, yellow backdrop and a browning rusty texture make well for a point and shoot let alone a crisp DSLR set. Top floor contained all the telecommunications equipment along with remnants of signal flares. 2nd floor from top contained the wall board with all the flight information and included various documents and information, other floors contained geological information and weather reports. Overall, a great and interesting explore. It is very rare to see somewhere that has deteriorated largely through weather and time rather than some little shit throwing bricks through the windows and wrecking the place. Pictures Thanks for viewing The Lone Shadow
  3. RAF Thurleigh Air Traffic Control Tower The Explore After a double visit to the RAE Bedford Windtunnel testing site, we decided to take a look at the ATC tower which was basically situated on the same site but on the other side of the massive multi-runway airfield. A long walk past some smelly sheep and a few dives into the bushes thanks to some farmer spreading equally smelly shit around the neighbouring field, eventually we were at the tower. On first inspection the place looked like it had been recently “sealed†with nice fresh looking boards all around but with a bit of head/ball scratching and a leap of faith from The Lone Shadow, myself and Session9 were in Didn’t bother with zillion cars parked on the runways as there were transporters and humans in hi-viz kicking around most of the time.. The History Thurleigh was built for RAF Bomber Command in 1940 by W & C French Ltd. Its first use was by NO.160 SQN RAF, forming on 16 January 1942. Thurleigh was one of 28 fields listed for use by the U.S. Eighth Air Force on 4 June 1942, tentatively designated station B-4, and was allocated on 10 August 1942. With the essential construction completed, the 306th Bombardment Group deployed to Thurleigh on 7 September 1942. The group flew the Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress aircraft, and remained at Thurleigh until 1 December 1945. That was the longest tenure of any U.S. air group at a UK base. Starting in 1946, construction work began on the airfield to turn the site into what became known as the Royal Aeronautical Establishment, Bedford. The runway was extended in the post-war period to accommodate the Bristol Brabazon aircraft (which required a very long runway) that ultimately never went into production. One local road was dropped into a cutting so that it would not sit above the level of the runway. All this airfield activity justified a Control Tower of this size… The Pictures Taken in 1957 (not really, was a few weeks ago ) 2/3. On the long walk to the tower we went past this rickety wooden construction with the bottom of the ladder entwined with thick thorny shit.. 4. Also this collection of buildings which didn't look worth the effort accessing.. 5/6. On to the ATC Tower itself.. 7. Main Tower Control.. 8. 9. 10. 11/12.. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19/20. 21. Central Stairwell 22/23. Lurking in the ladies.. 24. As always, thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated
  4. Thurleigh was built for RAF Bomber Command in 1941 by W & C French Ltd in 1941. On 7th September 1942 the 306th Group started to arrive; with some of their B17s flying in the following week. From October 1942, the 306th Group mounted a long and arduous offensive suffering many losses. The Group finally completed their long war on 19th April 1945 which was their 342nd mission; the second highest for any B17 Group. During its time at Thurleigh over 9,600 sorties had been flown with the loss of 171 aircraft in action and over 22,500 tons of bombs were dropped. In 1946 construction work began on the airfield to turn the site into what became know as the Royal Aeronautical Establishment, Bedford. The airfield was finally closed in 1997. This is the control tower
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