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  1. History Kelenföld Power Plant is located in Budapest and was originally established in 1914, in conjunction with Hungary's electrification program. It was known as one of the most sophisticated and technologically advanced throughout Europe and supplied electricity to the entire capital. The site itself featured the first boiler house as an electrical supply building in the city. Between 1922 and 1943 the plant underwent two extension phases which introduced 19 modernised steam boilers and 8 turbines. These were operated at 38 bar steam pressure and transferred the increasing demand for electricity through 30 kV direct consumer cables. The equipment used was considered state of the art at the current time and was all produced by Hungarian manufacturers. By the 1930s the facility contributed to 60% of Budapest's heating and hot water which made up 4% of the country's overall energy supply. The infamous Art Deco control room, also known as 'Special K' was completed in 1927, after two years of construction. Designed by notable architects Kálmán Reichl and Virgil Borbíro, because of this, it's listed as a protected site under Hungarian law and cannot be restored or destroyed. The Kelenföld control room is widely acclaimed as one of the most stunning monuments of industrial art. It uniquely explores the boundaries between functionality and grandeur, featuring a decorative oval skylight alongside the retro style green panels, hosting a range of buttons, dials, and gauges. Once the Second World War had begun, a small concrete shelter was added for the employees. This was due to the ornate glass ceiling, as it was considered to be a target during the bombing raids in the city. By 1962 the plant was modernised again with accordance to the heat supply demands of the capital. The existing condensing technology was replaced with back pressure heating turbines and hot water boilers. This increased reliability, as coal was steadily becoming more outdated and inefficient. In 1972 gas turbines with a capacity of 32 MWe were integrated into the plant and were the first to be put into operation throughout Hungary. In 1995 another redevelopment phase was initiated which provided the power station with a heat recovery steam generator and later on in 2007 a water treatment plant was established. The control room itself was closed in 2005, since then it has been featured in a few well-known films such as the Chernobyl Diaries and World War Z. Other areas of the site remain active through private ownership, with buildings still providing power to Budapest. Our Visit We arrived in Budapest feeling cautiously optimistic, we had other locations on our agenda for the weekend but Kelenföld was a significant reason for our visit. It's something I've wanted to see since I started exploring a couple of years ago and failure was not an option for us. We had 3 days and therefore 3 attempts (at the minimum) to access it. Fortunately for us, we managed to get in the first time around and we couldn't have really asked for a better way to kick off the trip. Once we made it inside the plant we found ourselves lost in a maze of locked doors and sealed off sections. Understandably they wanted to make it as difficult to get into the control room as possible. Whilst searching we heard the familiar sound of nearby footsteps and radio so we quickly found a decent spot to hide. "We have to keep moving, if we stay here we'll get busted," I said to my exploring partner, after a handful of excruciating minutes, listening to them steadily get closer and so we pressed on. Without giving too much away we managed to find our way to the main spectacle and were instantly blown away by it's immense beauty. So without further ado, onto the photos! Unfortunately, with the security guard on the hunt for us we decided to bounce before getting caught ((more so my other half than myself.) As much as I would have loved to stay, I didn't argue. Means we have an excuse to go back! As always if you've got this far, hope you enjoyed reading my report
  2. We are Forgotten Productions, Urban Explorers from Toronto,Canada. We are looking forward to sharing our adventures with you all through photos and video footage. We try and bring a little bit of fun to exploring while still showing you everything that has been left behind in its current beauty. Please show us your support by Subscribing to our YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNp-X7HUAx9iVMn1unDv1JA Or following us on Instagram @forgotten_productions_416 For more updates on what we are up to find us on Facebook and Twitter Love you guy's thanks for your support 👊
  3. A night in the Paris Metro My first report for a while and I felt that my photos from each location wouldn't create a substantial enough report. Because of this I decided to compile them into a more lengthy post documenting the night in which we explored various sections of the Paris Metro. I hope you enjoy reading my story and seeing the images I managed to capture. After arriving in Paris with @Letchbo for a short weekend break, we decided to begin our night of exploring by hitting a classic metro spot. Once we'd safely entered the area we wanted to photograph, we hid in an alcove for a short period of time. Patiently waiting for the end of service with front row seats to watch the last remaining trains hurl past us. As soon the service concluded for the night, we eagerly got our cameras out and started shooting. Fortunately we managed to grab a couple of decent photos before we heard what we presumed were track workers approaching nearby. We quickly concluded it was best to abort mission and keep moving ahead. Photographing sections of track as we progressed down the line, until we reached the next station and swiftly departed unnoticed. By the time we were back out above ground the night was still young and we headed onto our next location. View of a train passing on Line 10 The double raccord We'd visited this spot earlier in the year along with @Conrad and @DirtyJigsaw after visiting another of Paris' famous ghost stations. But when we arrived at this one, we noticed a large number workers across the tracks and decided to give it a miss. Fast forward to October, we thought try our luck again. My partner made his way over the fence but as I was about to climb in and join him, someone abruptly stopped me in my tracks. "Bonsoir!" "Bonsoir?" The rather authoritative looking chap approached me and continued speaking to me in French (to which I didn't fully understand.) I politely explained we were English. He then proceeded to pull a badge out and clearly stated to me the word every urban explorer wants to hear on a night out exploring the metro. "Police." Oh fuck. That's when we thought the night had sadly come to a prompt conclusion. Fortunately for us after a brief discussion with us claiming to be photographing the canal, he decided to allow us to resume our business and once he was well out of sight we made our way straight in. Onto a bit of history, Arsenal station was officially opened in 1906 and is located in the 4th arrondissement of Paris. In addition to this, it is also situated on line 5 between the Bastille and Quai de la Rapée stations. After 33 years of operation, it was closed in 1939 at the start of the Second World War. This was due to French resistance members allocating the area as an ammunition depot. Once Paris had been liberated from German forces August of 1944, a battle more commonly known as Battle for Paris and Belgium. It was decided reopening Arsenal would be inefficient. This was on account of its close proximity to neighbouring stations which limited the flow of passengers. For 75 years the station has been largely abandoned aside from graffers, urban explorers, photographers and avid thrill seekers, such as ourselves. Once we'd grabbed a few shots of the abandoned Arsenal Station, we continued photographing another small section of track further down the line. It was quite photogenic and was a welcomed bonus to what had already been a predominately successful night for the both of us. Before long the morning was fast approaching, coinciding with the threat of the service resuming. We reluctantly called it a night, making our way out and back to our accommodation, covered in metro dust and feeling pretty relieved we managed to pull it all off after a few close encounters. As always if you got this far, thanks for reading
  4. New member here, but far from new to urbex. I have always had an interest in exploring and adventuring within abandoned locations. When I explore I take images and video and I upload to my YouTube channel. I notice that there appears to be a fairly sizable rift between Stills photographers and videographers (mainly YouTubers). As I said before I am a YouTuber but I don't beg for likes and subscriptions. I research locations, explore it and document it. None of this "smash the like button" or "nearly died" fakery that a lot of video people do simply to generate exposure. I think genuine urban explorers whether they are stills people or video people actually have more in common than they think and Perhaps we should be more worried about outright fakery that occurs on both sides of the spectrum. Within the YouTube urbex community, there is a genuine distaste for people who are creating fake content. The term that is widely used is "urbex theatre". It's a work of fiction, dressed up to be an explore. The same occurs within the photography sector where people are manipulating images to the extent they do not even resemble the original location. There are also situations where people rearrange locations to set up their shots (photo or video) and this really just takes away from the whole abandoned theme. Genuine explorers are genuine explorers regardless of the medium you choose to record your explores on, or the platform you choose to display your work. Would love to hear your thoughts on this...
  5. Fairly new to this site, but I have been urbexing for years. is anyone from the USA? That is where I am from and would love to talk to people about places
  6. I am looking for new places to urbex. I am from the northeast Ohio area near Akron. Feel free to email me if you have any places you are willing to share. I will exchange places. my email is [email protected] I attached some images from previous urbexes.
  7. I found this house totally abandoned with everything left including the car! Theres so much stuff inside I could literally barely walk around. Be sure to check out my other videos. Thanks a lot. My Channel link: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7PBeCakMSXGSD0yHuCXIcQ
  8. Hi fellas, I explore a mining colony, looking for these graffiti freaks, in the video section, I've shared the video of this place. I hope to enjoy NOFILTER NOEDITION
  9. part 5 of the germany tour great video part 5
  10. hi all just in new pictures from part 5 germany
  11. This place was a restaurant, incredible restaurant!!
  12. https://www.instagram.com/laiko_pamirsti/
  13. Hey guys! I'm going on a trip to Montenegro next week, and while I was there I wanted to visit some abandoned places. Can anyone give me some advice? (to urbex spots in Montenegro or in the near countries like Albania). I can trade with a bunch of spots in Italy if you want. Thank you! ?
  14. Falcon house. It's been in Swindon since the early days of this towns birth and has been sat empty and abandoned for 16 years. It was said to be the very first headquarters for the well known company zurich, an insurance company, but was promptly moved to a more practical and efficient property. The old office block is situated in Swindon town centre on top of a car park right near the entrance to town, which is an eye sore to some but a worthy explore for us. There was nothing much left, only old phones and some really old school computer stuff. It was the view at the end of the video that made it all worth it, being the second highest point in the town aside from the john murray building. What a view! So please enjoy this video by my good friend and make sure to check out the channel! Have fun out there, C
  15. Hi mates, I want to share with you the exploration of an abandoned mansion in Spain witha a 360º camera. Move your mouse to see whatever you want in the vid!
  16. An abandoned beacon in the baltic sea. There are two of it. One 1000m and the other one in 4000m distance from the runway. Ther were used to enlarge the range of the runway ...so the pilots could navigate easier to the short runway. Build and used by the NVA. The army of the former GDR... (DDR).
  17. After hearing about the permanent closure of this well known super store giant, we felt like a part of our childhood was gone forever. In the store we visited, we found the names of those loyal workers written on the wall with one of those people having worked there for 20 years, but unfortunately we couldn't go back and get a photo due to my camera running out of juice. But all is not lost as there is a full video on my friend's youtube channel so check it out! Here are the best photos we managed to get, thanks for looking. C
  18. What's left of the south marston hotel, remains an empty, scorched shell. Not much to see on this one, and I am way to late but hey, it still provides an eerie vibe. And the photos came out pretty good too. Thanks, C
  19. Chateau Marianne / Chateau Alchimiste History Not much history on this location but it was rumoured to be have been once occupied by a former professor. The chateau is located in a small, rural town in France. The town's residents have halved in the last 40 years and it was beginning to look quite run down. I can imagine the nickname 'Alchimiste' (which means Alchemist in French) came from all the chemistry equipment left behind such as: test tubes, syringes, bottles, cylinders and beakers. It seems the previous inhabitant was also a bit of an artist, we found many paintings scattered around the house and a large collection in the attic, as well as a small studio in an upstairs room. Visit I visited this beautiful chateau on a euro trip with @PROJ3CTM4YH3M. We went the previous night to check to see if it was accessible and boy we were in for a shock! Neither of us realised how much stuff had been left and how interesting the contents were. We both particularly liked the framed butterfly collection which was hung up in one of the living rooms, as it reminded us of the film 'Silence of the Lambs.' After a short investigation we decided to return the following day and booked a hotel in a nearby town. Arriving the next morning once sun had risen, the place was really brought into it's element. So, as always, hope you enjoy my photos! If you've got this far, thanks for reading
  20. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. A former ballhaus somewhere in the eastern of Germany. At the moment they are renovating the building and for a small amount of money you can get acces for taking photographs.
  21. Campina Youth House Haven't seen this one posted anywhere so I decided to chuck a quick report up on it. I would say this particular location could be described as disused rather than abandoned, as it looked like there was redevelopment work going on when we arrived. Hence why it is so nice and pristine. Anyway, onto a little bit of history I found.. History The Youth House was orginally built as a leisure centre in Campina. A city situated roughly around the South East of Romania. It was constructed by local authorites in order to create a space for young people to participate in a range of sporting activities such as: aerobics, matrial arts and boxing. It was also established in order to promote culture and education and the house provided various facilities for the arts. The Youth House hosted a large auditorium to showcase fairs, exhibitions, conventions, concerts and festivals. Visit Visited with @darbians and @Gigi on a long weekend trip to Romania. We were driving past and saw what we orginally thought was a hotel and decided to check it out. Finding this place was defintely an unsuspected susprise and I'm very glad we decided to pull over. I really enjoyed photographing this one and I espiecally liked the mosiacs which reminded me of the ones at Buzludzha I had seen the previous year. I hope you enjoy my report! When you find a window open on the top floor, gotta get a few photos from the roof Thanks for reading!
  22. Villa Scorpio History Unfortunately I couldn't find a great deal of history surrounding this location but from what I have gathered it was built at some point during the late 19th century. The former occupier owned a large cement factory in the same town. I would imagine the family were quite well off, as it was very grand and exquisite building. The design of the villa shared various similarities with the Art Nouveau style of architecture. Featuring a stunning staircase, a beautiful skylight and an decorative greenhouse. Our visit Visited with @darbians and @vampiricsquid on our tour of Italy last summer. As soon as we arrived outside, we knew it was going to be a good explore. Hope you enjoy my photos! Externals Internals
  23. Mineral Springs Bath House The construction of the Mineral Springs Bath House began in 1907. This was in order to bring in more tourism and wealth into the area. The town it was built in was an excellent location to host a bath house, as it was well known for it's rich mineral water sources which was believed to have medicinal properties. During the start of the 20th century mineral baths were a very fashionable and popular leisure activity. It took 3 years to build, with the help of local residents and neighbouring villages. It was finally unveiled with a ceremony in 1911. The materials which were used for the interior were designed in Vienna, France and Belgium and it was the most expensive healing bath in Bulgaria at that current time. Typical to most bath houses, it was separated into two sections, one for the men and another for the women. Both areas accommodated for it's visitors with a large circular pool, changing rooms and 10 bathtubs. The baths also provided central heating facilities, the main parts of the building were kept consistently at 15°C, the changing rooms at 28°C and the baths themselves were 32°C. The bath house was also equip with a clinic, admin offices and a large laundry room. Sadly the Mineral Springs Baths eventually closed in 2001, due to the decline in interest and popularity along with the lack of investment by the local government. Externals Internals If you've got this far, thanks for reading
  24. Did you ever went to an Island full of creepy dolls??? NO??? Let me take you with you! On my holiday in December 2017 to Mexico I heard about this place so I had to go. There is no holiday without finding some decayed stuff! The story goes as followed: The guy who lives on this Island found a girl who was drowned around the island. He also found a doll floating nearby and, assuming it belonged to the deceased girl so he hung it on a tree as a sign of respect. After he did that he heard whispers and foodsteps around his hut where he lived. He started to collect and hang more and more old dolls to calm down the spirit of the drowned girl. In 2001 the owner of the Island died and was found on the same spot where the girl was found. When I wanted to go to this place I had to find someone who wanted to bring me there because it was hard to reach according to people around there because of latest hurricanes and earthquakes . After a lot of negotiations I found someone with a little boat to go there and to be honest it was worth the whole trip!! I hope you liked it! Let me know what you think! Marco Bontenbal https://pixanpictures.com
  25. Hey, guys, we are the Urban Collective and we don't want you to think we're here for views or to sell teeshirts like most of the tripe you see on YouTube (No disrespect intended)... We actually have a genuine new found passion for #UrbanExploration and have been constantly uploading Photographic and video reports to @obliviontate recently and will continue to do so. We'd just like take a moment to share our new trailer for the channel for a bit of feedback and just to let you guys know we exist. We're always paying attention to what others do, and give good positive feedback on posts across the forum and the web. We adhere to the rules Urban Exploring and would just like to continue to share our experiences photos videos etc with like minded people within an awesome community. We are just that face in the crowd watching as the high streets dwindle and the corporations take over. We are The Urban Collective We Film It... By the way guys, i hope I posted this in the right place? Sorry if I didn't I didn't want to post it in the videos bit because it is not a report cheers guy's.
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