Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'austria'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • General Discussion & Forum information
    • Forum information
    • Just take a moment & say Hi
    • General Discussion
  • Exploration Forums
    • Military Sites
    • Industrial Locations
    • Hospitals & Asylums
    • Public buildings, Education & Leisure
    • Underground Explores
    • High Places
    • Manors, Mansions & Residential
    • Religious Sites
    • Anything Else
  • Other Forums
    • Video Reports
    • Short Reports
    • Themed Threads

Categories

  • About the Forum
  • Urban Exploring information
  • Photography and camera advice
  • Technical Help

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website URL


Location


Interests

Found 7 results

  1. Disclaimer: Some of the images displayed in my album contain anti semitic graffiti. I'm not promoting anti semitism here but am only showcasing what's inside this bunker. Today's post is about the exploration of a World War II bunker, that has been abandoned since approximately 1955, when Austria signed the Declaration of Neutrality. Construction began during the war but because of the siege of the Red Army, the bunker was never finished. Nowadays, most of the former exits have been walled off with only one proper entry and exit remaining. Rescuing people trapped in certain areas of the facility would be close to impossible, due to some entrances being filled with stones and mud. You imagine bunkers like concrete mazes and even though it looked like one, it was hard to get lost. It was very easy to navigate around even though the tunnels measure about 700m (0.45 miles) in total. Initially, there were around 5 to 7 entrances throughout the whole structure which made it impossible to get lost. DSC_5054 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_5080 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_5085 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_5090 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_5124 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6339 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6351 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6353 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6357 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6369 by anthrax, auf Flickr If anyone is interested in more, the full album of photos can be found here and my post about the structure here.
  2. Visited this one with @AndyK! and @darbians as the first real stop on a big week-long derp bonanza of some sort, after two fails the day before this (after a 12+ hour drive). We had checked it out the night before, without much luck, so as it was getting late, and we were all suffering massive sleep deprivation, we decided to turn in for the night. But before leaving town in the morning for the next few stops, we decided to have another try with the help of daylight, and it sure paid off. I can't find a lot of history on this place, it seems to be quite the 'ghost' online, but it does boast some pretty epic vintage machines. What's interesting here is that it is all preserved so well, yet there are no signs of potential conversion into event space or something similar, which is something that happens a lot with these kinds of places. Photos - Cheers ­čśÄ
  3. This is inside of a factory that was once used for producing the somewhat famous Pandur-Tanks. This area of the factory closed sometime in 2015/16, with first signs showing as early as 2010. At first the company decided to restructure by stopping production and only using the plant at this location for tank maintenance, service and repair. When this decision was finalized about 60% of employees were dismissed. Reasoning - there wasn't enough demand for new vehicles. In late 2016 the police was called to a so called "illegal rave" that was held in one of the former production halls. Tens of thousands of euros in equipment were left behind. full story 50+ pics DSC_5646 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6939 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_5665 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_5724 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_5739 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6707 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6743_1 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6812 by anthrax, auf Flickr
  4. Hello folks! I recently visited an abandoned military barrack which was used by Pioneers for almost a hundred years. The area is abandoned for a few years now, 2015 the buildings were used for accommodation for refugees. Since somewhere around then, the place sits empty. There are already plans on how the area is going to be used once they tore down the remains of the barracks. A new district housing around 2500 people, a school campus and a kindergarten amongst other things will be built here. All that a car-free zone. Can't say I'm too bummed about that, sounds like it could be a sick project! DSC_6434 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6453 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6463 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6478 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6486 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6494 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6512 by anthrax, auf Flickr DSC_6544 by anthrax, auf Flickr If I could excite you for more, check out the full album here or my post about it here.
  5. Founded in early 1800's the complex was initially used as a hand weaving mill. Following 30 years of manual work the means of production changed when the small mill was bought by a young interpreneur who changed the concept to include hydropower. A few years after that, the mill changed owners again when it was decided to enlargen the mill and convert it into a fully functional factory, instead of a small hydropower driven mill. Successively more and more looms and heavy machinery were added when a textile producer outsourced his production because of monetary advantages. During WW2 the production was stopped and the factory used for producing telecommunication materials for the military. Because of the decline of the texile industry in Europe and outdated machinery the factory had to close for good in the 2000's. Now it's slowly consumed by nature and open for urban explorers like me. Full Album: (70+ photographs) https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157669234673708/with/42217673072/ Full Blog Post: http://inwordsandpictures.net/textilefactory DSC_7178 by anthrax, auf Flickr 1 DSC_7224 by anthrax, auf Flickr 2 DSC_7237 by anthrax, auf Flickr 3 DSC_7241_1 by anthrax, auf Flickr 4 DSC_7252 by anthrax, auf Flickr 5 DSC_7259 by anthrax, auf Flickr 6 DSC_7272 by anthrax, auf Flickr 7 DSC_7302 by anthrax, auf Flickr 8 DSC_7308 by anthrax, auf Flickr 9 DSC_7336 by anthrax, auf Flickr 10 DSC_7350 by anthrax, auf Flickr 11 DSC_7382 by anthrax, auf Flickr 12 DSC_7394 by anthrax, auf Flickr 13 DSC_7414 by anthrax, auf Flickr 14 DSC_7425 by anthrax, auf Flickr 15 DSC_7431 by anthrax, auf Flickr 16
  6. Today I visit some kind of factory buildings near a train station. I'm unsure if this was part of some other factory or if those were standalone buildings. One from the two had a cafeteria, so it appears plausible that this was a seperate firm. I'm saying that because the buildings are located on a industrial area where many companies, warehouses and such are located. Enjoy! Full: https://flic.kr/s/aHsmcr8Da
  7. I totally forgot to edit these photos of a recent exploration tour. A friend informed me of an abandoned sawmill by the lake so I had to check it out. On location are many different buildings, one where a family once lived in which is not accessible for the behaved urbexer like me, as no windows were broken into or any locks were picked (or rather, doors knocked down). The sawmill wasn't locked off, so I took my chance there. The main floor was used for wood-working while it looks like the other floor helped power the machines for the main floor by hydropower. I even found remains of a saturday night party of a few friends and a shoe on a table! Full: https://flic.kr/s/aHsmcrd3PL
×