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Found 12 results

  1. Hi all! Another from us, this time an abandoned Nightclub which has huge bank vaults in the 2 separate basements! Enjoy HISTORY: So the building itself was built around 1940 and was designed for the bank of England. The site itself is built with 2 separate basements with one of them being a gold vault containing, you got it, gold. In 1994 it became the 'The Walkabout' however after this didn't go to plan it was then brought out and became Wahoo (Which the signs are still up on the outside of it). It is due to be converted into student accommodation.
  2. And old 18 century house with had a bank function.The building is stripped of all furniture an will probably be renovated in some future. Needed to be a little bit inventive to gain access to this one. But later I was all alone, with the only sound coming from the people in front of the building. 1 IMG_1541 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 2 IMG_1534-bewerkt by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 3 IMG_1519-bewerkt by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 4 IMG_1488 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 5 IMG_1453 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 6 IMG_1441-bewerkt by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 7 IMG_1450-bewerkt by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
  3. The Visit This was unfortunately one of them explores that has lots of potential but somehow just doesn't live up to expectations. See what you guys think anyway The History This old school building was designed by the architects Innocent and Brown and opened in 1875. In 2003 the school was moved to a new, purpose-built building on Andover Street, built on the former St Catherine's RC Primary School site. The original school building is now Grade II listed. It stands in a prominent position on the hillside with great views across the city with plans to convert it into apartments.
  4. Explored with Raz, FatPanda & Jord - Pic Heavy A Brief History of Bakewell Chert Mine Holme Bank was the last of two operational chert mines in Derbyshire the other being the Pretoria Mine, both at Bakewell. Access was from adits in a quarry at Bank Top and the steep workings extended beneath the road to connect with the earlier Greenfield shaft. The chert bed lies on a 1 in 3.7 gradient and the mine was subject to flooding in severe winters. Illumination was by mains electricity in addition to carbide lamps carried by the miners. Chert is a form of fine-grained, flinty silica most commonly found in veins in the uppermost beds of a limestone sequence. Chert was worked into tools in prehistoric times, easily shaped by chipping off flakes to produce sharp edges.The most useful role for chert was recognised about two centuries ago for the grinding of calcined flint, used as a whitening agent in earthenware manufacture. In 1772 the potter Josiah Wedgwood recommended Derbyshire chert as a major improvement over granite millstones, which left annoying black specks in the pure white flint. The chert bed was on average 9 ft (2.7 m) thick, though up to 18 ft (5.5 m) in places. It was extracted by removing the underlying limestone so that the chert fell under its own weight. A hoist powered by compressed air loaded it onto flat wagons, drawn to the surface by compressed air winches along a 1 ft 6 in (46 cm) gauge railway. The ‘waste’ limestone was built up into substantial roof supports. Early 19th-century extraction at Holme Bank was from quarries but commercial mining was in place by 1867, when the site was known as Bakewell Chert Mine. Later it was also referred to as Smith's Mine, after the owner. The workings consisted of an extensive system of passages with eight entrances. In 1925, 41 men were employed but 20 years later only 21 were at work. Approximately half worked underground. Between the two World Wars, mining broke out on the surface, enabling the chert to be quarried alongside limestone. In its later years Holme Bank met a considerable demand for poultry grit. The mine closed between 1959 and 1961 but a block-making plant, trading as Smith’s Runners, remained in operation, using existing supplies of chert. In recent years the few underground visitors to Holme Bank Mine have included cave divers, using the clear subterranean waters for training purposes. Almost 10 years ago the Peak Park Planning Board granted permission for the mine to be opened up to visitors but this plan has so far not been implemented. Heres a Video link to some guys diving in the mine; The Explore; So after an early start and a long trip to Birmingham of which i remember only about 15 mins due to being in the land of nod, we had already explored Birmingham Central Library and tried 2 other places, so on our way home Mr i love mines & cranes Raz suggested a mine! With low batteries and low energy we were rather unprepared but still we ventured on, arriving at the entrance (which you can't miss due to the tempreture drop of freezing air flowing up from the pit bottom) and doing a little sqeezing and we were in! We quickly realised that the roof was in a dire state and in some places it was actually being held up by rotten wood and stones stacked on top of each other. This made me very very uneasy and we came to the decision not to go too far in without any disagreement. Heres a few more of our adventures underground; Thanks for looking
  5. The former London headquarters of Midland Bank, a Grade I-listed property designed by Edwin Lutyens and John Alfred Gotch and built in 1925, is soon to be turned into a boutique hotel. The imposing building, in the heart of the Square Mile, was vacated six years ago by HSBC, which bought Midland in 1992. It has since operated as a branch of NatWest and as a filming location for Channel 4's game show The Bank Job. It's vaults also appeared in the 1964 James Bond film Goldfinger. The sequence in which it appeared sees the Bond villain Oddjob meet his demise. The main hall was at one time the largest bank hall in Europe. The new hotel will be part of the Soho House group, which owns a string of private members' clubs (some with accommodation), restaurants and stand-alone boutique hotels. The large building will feature 255 rooms, as well as restaurants, bars, spa and gym facilities and a swimming pool. Work is now well under way so I was really lucky to see this when I did, I saw an opportunity and I seized it. I hope you enjoy the pics, they were all taken handheld in the space of about 5 minutes. Thanks for looking
  6. Visited with Paul Powers and 2nd explore of my second day up there at his place!Doing a report on this one first though mainly for the reason i like these pictures enough to want to share on here,and there on my pc ready to go Brief and i mean brief exerct of history taken from tut net Holme Bank was the last of two operational chert mines in Derbyshire the other being the Pretoria Mine, both at Bakewell. Access was from adits in a quarry at Bank Top and the steep workings extended beneath the road to connect with the earlier Greenfield shaft. The chert bed lies on a 1 in 3.7 gradient and the mine was subject to flooding in severe winters. Illumination was by mains electricity in addition to carbide lamps carried by the miners. Pranged my head pretty hard in here by being a twat who wasn't really looking where i was going pics.. Thanks for looking and i must say it's a bloody lovely mine,we by no means covered the lot but there was some fairly fresh looking roof falls and i had other places to go.
  7. ...GT MANOR... ...OXFORDSHIRE... ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Visited this grand 'ole girl last year, but wasn't at all happy with the pictures. So with the spate of recent activity and being at a loose end I thought I'd nip back for a 'remooch'. Rather glad I did!! Here's me pix, ENJOY!!! ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ​ ​ ​ Thanks for looking...
  8. The West Park 'Brain Bank'... 2nd stop off on a 'daaan saaaf' road trip. 'The Underwater Ballroom', 'The Acid House' and this little oddity! Visited with NK, Alt and Shhh! Strange atmosphere in here and SOOOO cold! But a REALLY good little splore! No picures of the fridges I'm afraid, they turned out a bit crap... Ta for lookin'
  9. After seeing Paul's report I knew it was about time I got back under ground. He made the place look pretty special, after all. With that in mind I got in contact with the land owner and arranged a visit at Holme Bank. He's a really top bloke, provided a great survey of the mine and also agreed to be the emergency contact in case we didn't get out on schedule. Couldn't have asked for more really. Since it was a permission visit I turned up with the wife, who has accompanied me into Box Quarry a couple of times in the past as well. After a [what must be] record amount of rainfall recently water was dripping into the mine from above more or less throughout - I was so very glad I brought a hat - but at least underground the weather doesn't affect you much unless you're draining. After locking the gate behind us I immediately headed down to one of the flooded sections of the mine that run along the whole Eastern length of the underground. I was surprised to find a large number of pipes, both large and small, running along of many of the passageways, and wading into the water slightly I spied what I imagine was the top of a fairly deep shaft with some heavy duty pipes popping up nearby. I can only assume all this was to help pump water out from the workings while they were still in use. I've since been told the pipes were most likely used for compressed air to run the mining tools. Always learning. 1. A passageway heading down into the flood, flanked by packed stone walls After returning to the main passage we headed down the rail tracks to a junction with a winch and a nice cart still in situ. I don't know if the graffiti is original but it certainly matches the paint found elsewhere in the mine. 2. Winched by jamescharlick, on Flickr Down by the cart, notice the pipes running along the ceiling, and on the right branch the tracks have been pulled up as the tunnel falls into another flooded section. 3. Tunnel Vision by jamescharlick, on Flickr At the edge of the water, again with the tunnel roof gradually lowering into the water, you can see a fall in the foreground. Made up of deads - small blocks of debris left when useful stone is removed from the mine, they are piled to form the packwalls of the tunnels and run through the majority of the mine. Because of the age of the mine, in several areas the packwalls have collapsed back into the passageways as the mine settles. 4. End Of The Road by jamescharlick, on Flickr At this point we realised that I'd taken up a whole lot of time shooting the very first part of the mine. At this rate we'd never see the rest, so we pushed on to the far end before stopping for lunch. Dry stone pillars as roof supports are a common feature of this mine, usually of single blocks piled in order of size. Eventually had mining continued I believe the gaps would have been filled, adding extra support and making the wide space into narrow pack walled tunnels to match what we had seen elsewhere in the mine. On the left you can see the furthest end face of the mine. Because this wall is not packed with deads you can clearly see the streaks of chert running through the rock. 5. A Maze Of Stone And Shadows by jamescharlick, on Flickr After refueling we headed into the Western side of the mine, which was mostly similar to what we had already seen but with fewer features save for chains dangling from the ceiling in various places! We headed to the North West gate to take a quick look at the external quarry before heading back down and around the South. 6. More examples of the dry stone roof supports At this point it was time to head back outside, have a quick look at the external workings above ground, and call to let people know we were out safely. And after suffering 4 hours of underground exploring it was the wife's turn for a little payback - time for some wool shopping! At that moment I was so glad we made it out in plenty of time to get to the shops. You bet I was.
  10. Moving on from my previous post here's another school Following the 1870 Education Act, the newly elected Sheffield School Board constructed 39 new schools in the city. Pye Bank School being one of them, designed by the architects Innocent and Brown and constructed in the 'English domestic gothic' style it was opened in 1875 and closed in 2003.
  11. Info The last two operational chert mines in Derbyshire were the Pretoria Mine and Holme Bank Mine, both at Bakewell. Pretoria opened in 1902. Access was from adits in a quarry at Bank Top and the steep workings extended beneath the road to connect with the earlier Greenfield shaft. The chert bed lies on a 1 in 3.7 gradient and the mine was subject to flooding in severe winters. Illumination was by mains electricity in addition to carbide lamps carried by the miners. The chert bed was on average 9 ft (2.7 m) thick, though up to 18 ft (5.5 m) in places. It was extracted by removing the underlying limestone so that the chert fell under its own weight. A hoist powered by compressed air loaded it onto flat wagons, drawn to the surface by compressed air winches along a 1 ft 6 in (46 cm) gauge railway. The ‘waste’ limestone was built up into substantial roof supports. Between the wars the number of employees, which in 1905 totalled 38, fell to about a dozen and by 1964 was reduced to four, only two of whom worked underground. Commercial output from Pretoria ended in 1968/9 In view of the flourishing state of the industry, the reporter was highly critical of the 17 or 18 shillings (85-90p) a week paid to the hard-working miners. Some had 25 years’ experience and all worked long hours underground. In recent years the few underground visitors to Holme Bank Mine have included cave divers, using the clear subterranean waters for training purposes. Almost 10 years ago the Peak Park Planning Board granted permission for the mine to be opened up to visitors but this plan has so far not materialised. Visited with lio112, diehardlove and J4M35_UK Sorry for so few shots of outside, it was hammering it down and I desprate to get down the mine U74A Splitting! kinda unnerving Stanton 1946 View the rest here; http://s68.photobucket.com/albums/i18/Zoot337/Urbex/Derby%20Mine/
  12. heres a report on this place from what i can understand it was a derpartment store like alders. ot closed and was used by the theatre supposidly. explored with solarpower if anyone noes anything about the history let me no! exterior interior
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