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Found 18 results

  1. Nice to go through my old files and which would fit in here This one don't need any introduction I guess...
  2. A site that needs little introduction Battersea A Power Station was built in the 1930s, with Battersea B Power Station to the east in the 1950s. The two stations were built to an identical design, providing the long-recognized four-chimney layout. The station ceased generating electricity in 1983, but over the past 50 years it has become one of the best known landmarks in London and is Grade II listed. I never saw myself coming back here but when a couple of friends travelling from afar got in contact I decided I wouldn't mind checking out the current state of play, @extreme_ironing and @shaddam came along for the ride too. We got around the whole site and didn't see a soul all night, security here seems to be on the ball one minute and completely useless the next. After recent events with another group getting caught and finding themselves in a shitty situation I would recommend using caution here though. They seem to treat this site like it's on holy ground when they catch people but the truth of the matter is it's no different to being on any other site legally. It's just that security are bigger assholes than usual and I have a message for them. Fuck you asshole security, I've been on your site four times now you dumb twats and I intend to come back for more 1. Control Room A 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Maze of scaffolding 7. Switch Room B 8. 9. An area that was previously unaccessible before the scaffolding went up. 10. This allowed us to access Control Room B, completely empty now but this was once full of dials and switches with a control panel 11. It faced towards the turbine hall in this direction 12. Some old pipes tucked away on B side 13. An old painting still preserved in the turbine hall 14. Fake security on the roof 15. Looking down from the base of one of the chimneys 16. Morning mist blowing past as we bid farewell Thanks for looking
  3. Went with SK, Miss_anthrope and one non member Everyone knows the history but a quick copy and paste from Battersea.org The proposal to site a large power station on the south bank of the River Thames at Battersea in 1927 caused a storm of protest that raged for years. Questions were raised in Parliament about pollution which might harm the paintings in the nearby Tate Gallery and the parks and "noble buildings of London". Now Battersea Power Station is one of the best loved landmarks after serving London with electricity for 50 years. In the UK during the 1920s electricity was supplied by numerous private companies who built small power stations for individual industries with some of the surplus power generated going to the public supply. There was a bewildering variety of incompatible systems, high cost and jealous competition between the numerous companies. This chaotic situation caused Parliament to decree that electricity generation should be a single unified system under public ownership.It was to be another 30 years before the electricity supply was nationalised. In the interim the formation of the London Power Company was a response by private owners to delay the imposition of public ownership. Set up in 1925 it took up Parliaments recommendation that electricity generation should be in fewer, larger power stations. This led directly to the building of the first super station, to produce 400,000 kilowatts, in Battersea. Sir Giles Gilbert Scott was commissioned to design the building. His other buildings include Liverpool Cathedral, Bankside Power Station, Waterloo Bridge and the classic red telephone box. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Just a mess around photo to see what it looks like and if people like it!!!!!! 10. 11. 12. thanks for looking guys hope you enjoy it
  4. Dropped by recently with The_Raw, Mr Grant, DazzaBabes and Bohemian Lad. Haven't been on-site properly since last Christmas when 28dl user Sentinel took on the wharf with his forehead and lost, lots has changed with the new chimney being 90% done and the interior being heavily scaffed up, providing new access routes to places recently less accessible. This scaff is on B side to give an idea, it was possible to clamber over any part of it including the flat level on top which was somewhat unnerving. First of all we headed into Control Room A via a new route and took a few snaps with my new lenses. And then over to B, on the way I noticed a windowed balcony similar to how Control Room A looks out onto the turbine hall, I realised I'd actually managed to get onto the door on the other side of it once before but it was locked then and now that staircase was full of asbestos sheeting and equipment, so we didn't go that route. In the meantime we headed on over to B side switch room. Back on the turbine hall floor we realised there was access to some portals underneath the room I noticed earlier and scaff up to the side of it, found a large discarded statue in some of the rooms below but I didn't snap it (not sure if anyone else did(?)), headed up the scaff beside the room and luckily the whole wall had gone missing. Not much left in the room unfortunately. Flooring and wall tiles along with the windows points towards something being here once, I thought maybe crane controls for the turbine hall. Turns out this was actually the Control Room for B side. ... or something similar to that, I'm a little confused now. After this we headed over to the new chimney to see if there was a way to access what we hoped might be a staircase on the inside, after a lot of crawling about the base of the structure managed to find an entry point to the interior. No easy way up unfortunately from within but was still a novelty, the echo in here is amazing. Was good to go back to Battersea, didn't expect to see anything new so was a nice surprise. Cheers Rawski for inviting us over. EI
  5. Had the chance to revisit everyone's favourite power station a few months ago. Yep, still doable! It was good to get in and grab some shots with the lights on. Nothing you haven't seen before, with the possible exception of some original Control Room Feeder Log Sheets we found in there - Dated November 1977 1. The huge control room 2. Control panels 3. Central command desks 4. Control desk 5. Control desks 6. Control desk 7. Central command desk 8. Mission control! 9. Comms system and papers 10. Papers on the desk 11. Feeder Log Sheets 12. Original paperwork from 1977 13. Synchroscope 14. Amp meter detail 15. Power Factor Meter 16. Back of control panels And in case you are wondering what the rest of the place looks like now - here's a crappy phone shot showing the scaffolding. The entire centre area was crammed full with more scaff than you possibly imagine! 17. Scaffolding inside turbine hall
  6. The Explore It doesn't get much more iconic than Battersea Power station. I visited twice with Sentinel, we had a feeling this would be a tricky place to conquer and we weren't wrong. On our first visit we encountered various obstacles and at points we nearly gave up on both control rooms but with a bit of perseverance we managed to access both and escape unseen. Control room A had possibly the biggest wow factor of anywhere I've been so far and immediately made all our efforts worthwhile. Control room B was pretty spectacular in it's own right as well although the more riskier of the two to access. Our second visit was a much slicker operation than the first and allowed us to take a little more time with our photography. The site is constantly evolving through different stages of construction so access points change overnight. Even in three days one door had been sealed and a huge new fence had appeared, perhaps signs that this place won't be accessible for too much longer. Needless to say we were pretty proud of ourselves for making it in and out without being caught and there was much punching of the air as we disappeared from the site, especially for Sentinel who also got away with wearing a mankini in Control room A at one point.....those pictures may one day surface but for now I can't bring myself to look! The History Battersea Power Station is a decommissioned coal-fired power station located on the south bank of the River Thames in Battersea, South West London. It comprises two individual power stations, built in two stages in the form of a single building. Battersea A Power Station was built in the 1930s and first operated in 1933, with Battersea B Power Station to its east in the 1950s operating first in 1953. Both stations were built to an identical design, providing the well known four-chimney layout. The station ceased generating electricity in 1983, but over the past 50 years it has become one of the best known landmarks in London and is Grade II listed. It is the largest brick building in Europe and is notable for its original, lavish Art Deco interior fittings and decor. However, the building's condition has been described as "very bad" by English Heritage and is included in it's Heritage at Risk Register. Since the station's closure the site has remained largely unused, with numerous failed redevelopment plans from successive site owners. In July 2012, the power station was sold to a consortium led by Malaysia’s SP Setia for £400 million. In January 2013 the first residential apartments went on sale. Construction on Phase 1 began in 2013, with completion due in 2016/17. The Pics 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. Thanks for looking
  7. What went down There is currently an event taking place for the duration of the summer called the 'Power of Summer' directly in front of Battersea Power station. It includes an open-air cinema, street food stalls and bars. I went along with Sentinel and extreme_ironing for a couple of beers and food and it wasn't long before we were looking up towards the chimneys wishing we were up there. This wasn't the plan by the way but we got excited at being so close and figured it would be rude not to at least have a go. We literally went to find the toilet and at some point must have taken a wrong turn because the next thing we knew we were inside Control Room A We just did control room A and had a mooch around on the roof as getting to B seems to be impossible now. It was an eventful evening capped with a great escape of epic proportions, this is definitely the explore that just keeps on giving....and this night goes up there as one of my most memorable ones Some history.... Battersea Power Station is a decommissioned coal-fired power station located on the south bank of the River Thames in Battersea, South West London. It comprises two individual power stations, built in two stages in the form of a single building. Battersea A Power Station was built in the 1930s and first operated in 1933, with Battersea B Power Station to its east in the 1950s operating first in 1953. Both stations were built to an identical design, providing the well known four-chimney layout. The station ceased generating electricity in 1983, but over the past 50 years it has become one of the best known landmarks in London and is Grade II listed. It is the largest brick building in Europe and is notable for its original, lavish Art Deco interior fittings and decor. However, the building's condition has been described as "very bad" by English Heritage and is included in it's Heritage at Risk Register. Since the station's closure the site has remained largely unused, with numerous failed redevelopment plans from successive site owners. In July 2012, the power station was sold to a consortium led by Malaysia's SP Setia for £400 million. In January 2013 the first residential apartments went on sale. Construction on Phase 1 began in 2013, with completion due in 2016/17. My piccie wiccies: I concentrated specifically on photographing the finer details on this visit so hopefully that will make this report a bit different..... The cinema - "you know what they call a Quarter Pounder with cheese in Paris?" The old cranes, this event is a good opportunity to get up close.... Control Room A Thanks for looking
  8. History Battersea Power Station is a decommissioned coal-fired power station located on the south bank of the River Thames. The station ceased generating electricity in 1983, but over the past 50 years it has become one of the best known landmarks in London. On 7 June 2012 it was sold to SP Setia and Sime Darby. In January 2013 the first residential apartments went on sale. Construction on Phase 1 is due to commence in 2013, with completion due in 2016/17. Visit Myself and The_Raw had been looking at doing this for a few weeks, A daytime visit a week before showed the way The night came for us to go in, Text came in saying forget about it, the access is locked down. Myself and The_Raw were not prepared to be outdone and thinking of another possible route, headed for that option. Once onto the site it was a fun time trying to read the maps kindly given to us, but since we had been up all day on another explore we were a bit brain dead, but after a while we sorted our heads out and got sorted with the access points into both Control Room A & B A second visit was needed as we wasted a lot of time the first time around, which provided a less stressful scenario and gave me an opportunity to act up a little bit to make The_Raw feel a little uncomfortable (not for the first time) Things are moving fast, even after a few days the ground floor route to Control Room B had changed.
  9. Evening all, I'm sure that its OK to post in here now considering the amount of people that are doing it lately? If not, please move and accept my apologies. I'll try not to bog down the post with too many photos, as I have a lot more to go and a lot on Flickr. Lots of detail shots in with these. I decided that I needed to do this, apart from a handful in the UK, I've not done much in this country this year. After help from some fellow explorers (you know who you are) I decided that a day off work was in order and a drive from sunny South Wales to London in the early evening was on the cards. In the meantime, I arranged to meet with Dursty, a fellow member of the OS forum and community who kindly took me to B and we did the roof together. On arriving and making it to the site and negotiating my way to control room A, I spent some time in here and worked pretty quickly for me, swopping between lenses and making the most out of the early part of the explore. Once Dursty arrived, we did Control Room B and climbed up to the base of the chimneys to get that awesome skyline. Some history Battersea Power Station is a decommissioned coal-fired power station located on the south bank of the River Thames, in Battersea, an inner-city district of South West London. It comprises two individual power stations, built in two stages in the form of a single building. Battersea A Power Station was built in the 1930s, with Battersea B Power Station to its east in the 1950s. The two stations were built to an identical design, providing the well known four-chimney layout. The station ceased generating electricity in 1983, but over the past 50 years it has become one of the best known landmarks in London and is Grade II* listed. The station's celebrity owes much to numerous cultural appearances, which include a shot in The Beatles' 1965 movie Help!, appearing in the video for the 1982 hit single "Another Thing Comin´" by heavy metal band Judas Priest and being used in the cover art of Pink Floyd's 1977 album Animals, as well as a cameo appearance in Take That's music video "The Flood." In addition, a photograph of the plant's control room was used as cover art on Hawkwind's 1977 album Quark, Strangeness and Charm. The station is the largest brick building in Europe and is notable for its original, lavish Art Deco interior fittings and decor. However, the building's condition has been described as "very bad" by English Heritage and is included in its Buildings at Risk Register. In 2004, while the redevelopment project was stalled, and the building remained derelict, the site was listed on the 2004 World Monuments Watch by the World Monuments Fund. The combination of an existing debt burden of some £750 million, the need to make a £200 million contribution to a proposed extension to the London Underground, requirements to fund conservation of the derelict power station shell and the presence of a waste transfer station and cement plant on the river frontage make a commercial development of the site a significant challenge. In December 2011, the latest plans to develop the site collapsed with the debt called in by the creditors. In February 2012, the site was placed on sale on the open property market through commercial estate agent Knight Frank. It has received interest from a variety of overseas consortia, most seeking to demolish or part-demolish the structure. Built in the early 1930s, this iconic structure, with its four distinctive chimneys, was created to meet the energy demands of the new age. Sir Giles Gilbert Scott – the man who also designed what is now Tate Modern and brought the red telephone box to London – was hired by the London Power Company to create this first of a new generation of ‘superstations’, with the building beginning to produce power for the capital in 1933. With dimensions of 160 m x 170 m, the roof of the boiler house 50 m tall, and its four 103 m tall, tapering chimneys, it is a truly massive structure. The building in fact comprised two stations – Battersea ‘A’ and Battersea ‘B’, which were conjoined when the identical B section was completed in the 1950s, and it was the world’s most thermally efficient building when it opened. But Battersea Power Station was – and is – so much more besides. Gilbert Scott lifted it from the prosaic into the sublime by incorporating lavish touches such as the building’s majestic bronze doors and impressive wrought-iron staircase leading to the art deco control room. Here, amongst the controls which are still in situ today, those in charge of London’s electricity supply could enjoy the marble-lined walls and polished parquet flooring. Down in the turbine hall below, meanwhile, the station’s giant walls of polished marble would later prompt observers to liken the building to a Greek temple devoted to energy. Over the course of its life, Battersea Power Station has been instilled in the public consciousness, not least when Pink Floyd famously adopted it for its Animals album cover and launch in 1977. As a result of its popularity, a great deal of energy has been expended in protecting this landmark. Following the decommissioning of the ‘A’ station in 1975, the whole structure was listed at Grade II in 1980 before, in 1983, the B station was also closed. Since that time, and following the listing being upgraded to a Grade II* status in 2007, Battersea Power Station has become almost as famous for plans heralding its future as for its past. Until now, that is. The transformation of Battersea Power Station – this familiar and much-loved silhouette on the London skyline – is set to arrive, along with the regeneration and revitalisation of this forgotten corner of central London. History is about to be made once more. Getting out in the early hours after a good 5 hours in here and then driving home. Glad I made it to this place to see for myself. On with some photos. A side B side External Thanks for looking in. Tim
  10. Yes, it's another Battersea report! Well it had to be done really, I've put it off long enough, what with stories of ruthless security and a guaranteed night in the cells if you got caught, the place being like a maze if you didn't know it well, the chances of actually getting across no-mans-land unseen being slim and finding yourself in the control rooms even slimmer, it just never seemed worth it. Now with development starting, it seems security have got rather lax and Battersea has opened its doors to practically any explorer who can be bothered to climb over the fence. I'd be gutted if I never saw it, so it had to be done. See frosty's report for a more detailed write up of our evenings trip, he's pretty much nailed it. It was tons of fun, and we spent waaaay longer in there than we expected to, so much so that we had to postpone something else we were going to do that night until another day. Please Note, due to large volumes of people, it was tricky to get any shots without people in them. Also please note the gift shop is out of "I've been to battersea" car stickers such is the volume of traffic through here lately Visited with so many people I can't remember, but among them was Frosty and SirJohnnyP who deserves a shout as despite the fact he was a little worse for wear not to mention a bit lost at times, he did guide us mostly round the place and it would have been a lot harder without him. Also shouts to another member who has been more than generous with sharing information on the place, you know who you are. So without further delay I present to you "YABR" (Yet another Battersea Report) starting, as always, with control room 'A' We did a brief visit to the 'white room' a curious mock up of a hotel room in the middle of the place, quite surreal. I didn't bother with any pics, but we chilled there for about half hour, had a fag and watched and episode of danger mouse on youtube. Then control room 'B' this wasn't as big as I expected it to be, but it's still impressive none the less. Yeah it HAD to be done, I know it's not original but I don't care. And after that and much farting around getting back down, we decided the night wouldn't be complete without climbing up to the base of at least one of the stacks, so we picked the North tower of 'A' side and went for it. Unfortunitely it was very windy and spitting with rain so I didn't really get any good pics, I wasn't really that bothered, I just wanted to get up close to one of the famous white chimneys. And that was that, mission accomplished. It's only taken me 6 years to get round to it. Now, anyone else thinking of going just go get it done, it IS worth it despite the millions of reports, you'll regret it if you don't make the effort! Thanks for looking Maniac.
  11. Well here we go, I’ve wanted to crack this for a few years but never got round to it, and once again Northern_Ninja came to my aid. So to help my continuing depression and sadness, I decided a trip here was on the cards. We planned to go the following evening, but with meal plans disrupted we decided to make it into a last minute road trip. I arrived at the Ninjas HQ at about 7:30pm and off to London we went in my small run around Punto armed with a stove, frying pan and sleeping bags. After a short drive we were finally there. We did the run across no mans land, through all the mud and crap and straight into A-side. For me; it did not disappoint. So many photographic wonders right in the centre of London. We spent a good few hours inside A-side before heading for the roof and getting some shots of the chimneys (it would be rude not to!), where I kindly received some help taking night time shots. After that we went straight up the scaffold on one of the chimneys. It was wet, cold, and quite scary, but totally wonderful at the top. I went about shooting my pictures of London and Battersea from the base of a chimney, which I shamelessly hugged for about 30 seconds. For me, Battersea was a bit of a milestone! After this, we headed down back into A-side and made the quick dash to B-side, where we spent the best part of an hour. It wasn’t as good in here, but still amazing nonetheless. Remember, here it is about the history of the place, and the purpose it served. From here, we went across onto the pier and checked out the cranes. The pigeons inside the internal ladder behind the operators cab thwarted our progress, but we admired the views from halfway up nonetheless. After Battersea we enjoyed sausage and bacon baps, cooked by Northern_Ninja under a railway bridge at 2:30am. We drove through Central London to West Silvertown where we slept uncomfortably in the back of the car, with only the view of Millennium Mills to keep us company. Busted within five minutes sadly in MM, but a good night before made up for that. P.S. I am a big Pink Floyd fan! Taken from SirJonnyPs report, probably harvested off Wiki! First of all, sorry about the amount of piccies!
  12. Hello, I have had this on my list for a long time and after a few messages we arranged a meet. Access was piss easy and we didn't see anyone or security. got lost loads of times inside and found the famous white room show flat but couldn't find access to the other control room. A revisit is on the cards i think. On our exit we found our original entry point had been sealed! Must be a magician Secca! Battersea Power Station is a decommissioned coal-fired power station located on the south bank of the River Thames. The station ceased generating electricity in 1983, but over the past 50 years it has become one of the best known landmarks in London. On 7 June 2012 it was sold to SP Setia and Sime Darby. In January 2013 the first residential apartments went on sale. Construction on Phase 1 is due to commence in 2013, with completion due in 2016/17.
  13. ...Battersea Power Station... Spent an evening lurking around this beast in the company of Mr and Mrs SK and Starlight aswell and about 15 other splorers whose names escape me!! Was a rather splendid way to spend an evening thats for sure!! Have wanted this one under the belt for some time now, the control rooms in particular as they really are summat else! They did not disappoint!! Thanks for lookin...
  14. The Icon of Power Battersea Power Station As the iconic four chimneys and the shell of Battersea Power Station begin a phase of redevelopment we decided it was time to get down to London and take a look around the place. Everyone will instantly recognise the exterior, but few have seen the Art Deco 'Control room A', or the later stainless steel 'Control Room B'. Even fewer get to see the Directors Entrance, we were unlucky enough to have that pleasure - read on... History Battersea Power Station is a decommissioned coal-fired power station located on the south bank of the River Thames, in Battersea, an inner-city district of South West London. It comprises two individual power stations, built in two stages in the form of a single building. Battersea A Power Station was built in the 1930s, with Battersea B Power Station to its east in the 1950s. The two stations were built to an identical design, providing the well known four-chimney layout. The station ceased generating electricity in 1983, but over the past 50 years it has become one of the best known landmarks in London and is Grade II* listed. Read the rest of the Wikipedia description if you want to know more. 1. External - on the roof Our Visits I have had two visits to Battersea, the first with Kriegaffe 9, Mars Lander, Sshhhh..., and our guides Dan and Andy. After a lengthy drive down to London the excitement started to build as we weaved between the buildings of the capital and the four chimneys eventually came into sight, looming over us looking as imposing and impenetrable as ever. Nerves starting to build as we notice the lights shining inside the huge shell of the building. 20 minutes later and we're looking up at those huge chimneys from the base of the immense brick façade. We make our way towards Control Room A and realise that entry into the Art Deco heart of the building isn't going to be an easy affair. Knowing what awaits us we push onwards and upwards, only hoping that dicing with death is worth it... It was! 2. View from the roof Unfortunately we didn't manage to get into Control Room B on the first visit due to pesky workmen deciding they wanted to work around there. How dare they! A revisit was required! Visit two, in the company of Proj3ctM4yh3m, Mr T, Magpie Tommie, Darbians and Zee Ze, we start off with some shots across the city and head inside to hit up Control Room B. The stainless steel heaven glistens under the workmens lights, and we finally head back to A side for some more shots of the darker of the tw control rooms. Once the buffet had been devoured we crack on with some shots. The lights come on! WTF!! We all glance a each other, knowing what's about to happen. The shadow moving across the back wall is followed by a cheery secuirty guard who is as surprised to find us in there as we were to see him! The 'official' way out is much easier! Mr secca allows us to get some shots of the Directors Entreance on the way down, and kindly let us grab some externals while we await the arrival of the police On with the pics... 3. Conrol Room A 4. Mission Control 5. Wall of Control 6. The Directors Doors 7. Directors Lift 8. Control Room B 9. Control Desk 10. Control Panel 11. Control Panel Detail 12. Synchroscope 13. The Jacuzzi 14. Us "leaving"... Oops! Thanks for reading my first report. I've only ever posted individual shots before, so you may recognise some from the Facebook group.
  15. Control Room A Visited with member Chaos and a gentleman known as Evilgenius. Battersea had been in the back of our minds for some time with varying stories of success and epic fails with the over zealous secca. Just before the tourist boom we thought we'd have a crack. This time we had one location on our minds within the menacing confines of Battersea, Control Room A. Notoriously difficult to access we made it our mission of the afternoon to get in there and get it done. History Designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, Battersea Power Station was built in two stages. Battersea A was finished in1933, with Battersea B coming on line in 1953. The two stations were built to an identical / mirrored design, providing the well known four-chimney layout. At it’s peak in 1953 it produced around 509MW making it the third largest in the UK at the time. This was a fifth of London’s electricity, with 28 other London stations producing the rest. By the 1970s the station's output was falling. This, coupled with increased operating costs, such as flue gas cleaning, led to Battersea's demise. On 17 March 1975, the A Station was closed after being in operation for 42 years. By this time the A Station was co-firing oil and its generating capacity had reduced to 228 MW. Three years after the closure of the A Station, rumours began to circulate that the B Station would soon follow. A campaign was then launched to try to save the building as part of the national heritage. As a result the station was declared a heritage site in 1980, when the Secretary of State for the Environment, Michael Heseltine, awarded the building Grade II listed status. (This was upgraded to Grade II* listed in 2007.) On 31 October 1983 production of electricity at Station B also ended, after nearly 30 years of operation. By then the B Station's generating capacity had fallen to 146 MW. The closure of the two stations was put down largely to the generating equipment becoming out-dated, and the preferred choice of fuel for electricity generation shifting from coal toward oil, gas and nuclear power. Since the station's closure the site has remained largely unused, with numerous failed redevelopment plans from successive site owners. In July 2012, the power station was sold to a consortium led by Malaysia’s SP Setia for £400 million. In January 2013 the first residential apartments went on sale. (I’m told they have now all been sold “off planâ€Â) An initial £100 million will go towards rebuilding the four chimneys and repairs to the brick-work and windows. Buro Happold, which has extensive knowledge of the site, is to advise on structural repairs for the property development, which will be managed by Turner & Townsend. The Battersea Power Station Development Company will now finalise plans for the interior of the building, for which it has recruited Wilkinson Eyre. The Explore We decided on a date and time and set off for London, we arrived with the sun still shining and parked up and made our way to our entry point, after a bit of high jump and some CCTV dodging athletics across no mans land that Team GB would be proud of we made it to A side. After a few glugs of water and quick wipe of sweat we moved off deeper inside. There was a hi vis jacket milling about in the distance that stopped us in our tracks, we had eyes on and realised it wasn't a threat so cracked on, we had a good look around and with a bit of a ninja's wet dream we made it to the correct level. Another two high vis vests were spotted so we laid low observing until they moved away (not entirely sure who they were, didn't look like your average secca...maybe contractors). We had a mooch about slogging through a blanket of pigeon shit, dead pigeons, nests and eggs and found an opening. With a push and squeeze holding our breaths from the stench we made it through and found what we were looking for. The door to Control Room A was open and inviting us in, we walked in to the mammoth art deco style room, it was as if the 1920's had just stopped with everyone disappearing leaving only the the control room lost in time. We made good use of the time and nice bit of natural sunlight we had coming through the windows and waisted no time capturing this incredible location. The light was starting to waiver so we decided to exit before we ended up scaling down the building in the dark which wasn't favourable considering the route we took in. Lovely explore and nice to have experienced this bit of history. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Thanks for looking
  16. Bad news for us, restoration begins in October : http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-22715644 And also read yesterday day in a news paper the first 400 odd houses will begin construction this 'summer' Happy sploring ;]
  17. Battersea Power Station Ok loads of rumours going round that we paid £3000 for this shoot WE DIDNT !!!! But some one did ,to cut a long story short if went like this a friend of a friend is a big photographer in London and shoots for the big add houses his client booked Battersea for the day at a cost of £3000 for a fashion shoot ,we were going down to help him move his equipment and help him set up the shoot which meant we were free to shoot when we got the opportunity...... Now this is were things get interesting at the last minute his client cancelled the shoot but the money had already been paid to Battersea so the friend of a friend told us to go any way and have a good day and that he would claim the money back of his client Thanks to Host for sorting it out and for getting public liability insurance so we were legal .Visited with Host, Critical Mass and Camera Shy Battersea Power Station is a decommissioned coal-fired power station located on the south bank of the River Thames, in Battersea, an inner-city district of South West London. It comprises two individual power stations, built in two stages in the form of a single building. Battersea A Power Station was built in the 1930s, with Battersea B Power Station to its east in the 1950s. The two stations were built to an identical design, providing the well known four-chimney layout. The station ceased generating electricity in 1983, but over the past 50 years it has become one of the best known landmarks in London and is Grade II* listed. The station's celebrity owes much to numerous cultural appearances, which include a shot in The Beatles' 1965 movie Help!, appearing in the video for the 1982 hit single "Another Thing Comin´" by heavy metal band Judas Priest and being used in the cover art of Pink Floyd's 1977 album Animals, as well as a cameo appearance inTake That's music video "The Flood." In addition, a photograph of the plant's control room was used as cover art on Hawkwind's 1977 album Quark, Strangeness and Charm. Since the station's closure the site has remained largely unused, with numerous failed redevelopment plans from successive site owners. The site was owned by the administrators of Irish company Real Estate Opportunities (REO), who bought it for £400 million in November 2006. In November 2010, REO was granted permission to refurbish the station for public use and build 3,400 homes across the site. However, this plan fell through due to REO's debt being called in by its creditors, the state-owned banks in the UK and Ireland. In July 2012, the power station was sold to a consortium led by Malaysia’s SP Setia for £400 million. The station is the largest brick building in Europe and is notable for its original, lavish Art Deco interior fittings and decor. However, the building's condition has been described as "very bad" by English Heritage and is included in its Buildings at Risk Register. In 2004, while the redevelopment project was stalled, and the building remained derelict, the site was listed on the 2004 World Monuments Watch by the World Monuments Fund. The combination of an existing debt burden of some £750 million, the need to make a £200 million contribution to a proposed extension to the London Underground, requirements to fund conservation of the derelict power station shell and the presence of a waste transfer station and cement plant on the river frontage make a commercial development of the site a significant challenge. In December 2011, the latest plans to develop the site collapsed with the debt called in by the creditors. In February 2012, the site was placed on sale on the open property market through commercial estate agent Knight Frank. It has received interest from a variety of overseas consortia, most seeking to demolish or part-demolish the structure. On 7 June 2012, it was officially announced by Knight Frank] that administrators Ernst & Young had entered into an exclusivity agreement with SP Setia and Sime Darby and are working towards a timely exchange and completion of the site and associated land. Completion of the sale took place in September 2012, and the redevelopment intends to implement the Rafael Vinoly design which had gained planning consent from Wandsworth Council in 2011. In January 2013 the first residential apartments went on sale. Construction on Phase 1 is due to commence in 2013, with completion due in 2016/17. 1. 2. 3. 4. History Until the late 1930s electricity was supplied by municipal undertakings. These were small power companies that built power stations dedicated to a single industry or group of factories, and sold any excess electricity to the public. These companies used widely differing standards of voltage and frequency. In 1925 Parliament decided that the power grid should be a single system with uniform standards and under public ownership. Several of the private power companies reacted to the proposal by forming the London Power Company. They planned to heed parliament's recommendations and build a small number of very large stations. The London Power Company's first of these super power stations was planned for the Battersea area, on the south bank of the River Thames in London. The proposal was made in 1927, for a station built in two stages and capable of generating 400 megawatts (MW) of electricity when complete.[5] The site chosen was a 15-acre (61,000 m2) plot of land which had been the site of the reservoirs for the former Southwark and Vauxhall Waterworks Company. The site was chosen for its close proximity to the River Thames for cooling water and coal delivery, and because it was in the heart of London, the station's immediate supply area. The proposal sparked protests from those who felt that the building would be too large and would be an eyesore, as well as worries about the pollution damaging local buildings, parks and even paintings in the nearby Tate Gallery. The company addressed the former concern by hiring Sir Giles Gilbert Scott to design the building's exterior. He was a noted architect and industrial designer, famous for his design of the red telephone box, and of Liverpool Anglican Cathedral. He would go on to design another London power station, Bankside, which now houses Tate Modern art gallery. The pollution issue was resolved by granting permission for the station on the condition that its emissions were to be treated, to ensure they were cleaner and contained less smoke. Construction of the first phase, the A Station, began in March 1929. The main building work was carried out by John Mowlem & Co, and the structural steelwork erection carried out by Sir William Arrol & Co. Other contractors were employed for specialist tasks.] Most of the electrical equipment, including the steam turbine turbo generators, was produced by Metropolitan Vickers in Trafford Park, Manchester. The building of the steel frame began in October 1930. Once completed, the construction of the brick cladding began, in March 1931. Until the construction of the B Station, the eastern wall of the boiler house was clad in corrugated metal sheeting as a temporary enclosure. The A Station first generated electricity in 1933, but was not completed until 1935. The total cost of its construction was £2,141,550. Between construction beginning in 1929 and 1933, there were six fatal and 121 non-fatal accidents on the site. A short number of months after the end of Second World War, construction began on the second phase, the B Station. The station came into operation gradually between 1953 and 1955. It was identical to the A Station from the outside and was constructed directly to its east as a mirror to it, which gave the power station its now familiar four-chimney layout. The construction of the B Station brought the site's generating capacity up to 509 megawatts (MW), making it the third largest generating site in the UK at the time, providing a fifth of London's electricity needs. It was also the most thermally efficient power station in the world when it opened. The A Station had been operated by the London Power Company, but by the time the B Station was completed, the UK's electric supply industry had been nationalised, and ownership of the two stations had passed into the hands of the British Electricity Authority in 1948. In 1955, this became the Central Electricity Authority, which in turn became the Central Electricity Generating Board in 1957. On 20 April 1964, the power station was the site of a fire that caused power failures throughout London, including at the BBC Television Centre, which was due to launch BBC Two that night. The launch was delayed until the following day at 11 am. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Design and specification Battersea power station was built in two phases. This is the power station in 1934, with the first phase operational Battersea power station was designed in the brick cathedral style. It is now the only existing example in England of this once common design style. Both of the stations were designed by a team of architects and engineers. The team was headed by Dr. Leonard Pearce, the chief engineer of the London Power Company, but a number of other notable engineers were also involved, including Henry Newmarch Allott, and T. P. O'Sullivan who was later responsible for the Assembly Hall at Filton. Theo J. Halliday was employed as architect, with Halliday & Agate Co. employed as a sub-consultant. Halliday was responsible for the supervision and execution of the appearance of the exterior and interior of the building. Architect Sir Giles Gilbert Scott was involved in the project much later on, consulted to appease public reaction, and referred to in the press as "architect of the exterior". The station was designed in the brick-cathedral style of power station design, which was popular at the time. Battersea is one of a very small number of examples of this style of power station design still in existence in the UK, others being Uskmouth and Bankside. The station's design proved popular straightaway, and was described as a "temple of power", which ranked equal with St Paul's Cathedral as a London landmark. In a 1939 survey by The Architectural Review a panel of celebrities ranked it as their second favourite modern building. The A Station's control room was given many Art Deco fittings by architect Halliday. Italian marble was used in the turbine hall, and polished parquet floors and wrought-iron staircases were used throughout. Owing to a lack of available money following the Second World War, the interior of the B Station was not given the same treatment, and instead the fittings were made from stainless steel. Each of the two connected stations consists of a long boiler house with a chimney at each end and an adjacent turbine hall. This makes a single main building which is of steel frame construction with brick cladding, similar to the skyscrapers built in the United States around the same time. The station is the largest brick structure in Europe. The building's gross dimensions measure 160 metres (520 ft) by 170 metres (560 ft), with the roof of the boiler house standing at over 50 metres (160 ft). Each of the four chimneys is made from concrete and stands 103 metres (338 ft) tall with a base diameter of 28 ft tapering to 22 ft at the top. The station also had jetty facilities for unloading coal, a coal sorting and storage area, control rooms and an administration block. The A Station generated electricity using three turbo alternators; two 69 megawatt (MW) Metropolitan Vickers British Thomson-Houston sets, and one 105 MW Metropolitan Vickers set, totalling 243 MW. At the time of its commissioning, the 105 MW generating set was the largest in Europe. The B Station also had three turbo alternators, all made by Metropolitan-Vickers. This consisted of two units which used 16 MW high pressure units exhausting to a 78 MW and associated with a 6 MW house alternator, giving these units a total rating of 100 MW. The third unit consisted of a 66 MW machine associated with a 6 MW house alternator, giving the unit a rating of 72 MW. Combined, these gave the B station a generating capacity of 260 MW, making the site's generating capacity 503 MW. All of the station's boilers were made by Babcock & Wilcox, fuelled by pulverised coal from pulverisers also built by Babcock & Wilcox. There were nine boilers in the A station and six in the B station. The B station's boilers were the largest ever built in the UK at that time. The B station also had the highest thermal efficiency of any power station in the country for the first twelve years of its operation. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Operations Coal transportation Coal was usually brought to the station by collier ships, and unloaded by cranes, which are still intact on the station's riverfront. The station had an annual coal consumption of over 1,000,000 tonnes. The majority of this coal was delivered to the station from coal ports in South Wales and North East England by coastal collier ships. The ships were "flat-irons"[30] with a low-profile superstructure, fold-down funnel and masts to fit under bridges over the Thames above the Pool of London. The LPC and its nationalised successors owned and operated several of its own "flat-irons" for this service. The jetty facilities used two cranes to offload coal, with the capacity of unloading two ships at one time, at a rate of 480 tonnes an hour. Coal was also delivered by rail to the east of the station using the Brighton Main Line which passes near the site. Coal was usually delivered to the jetty, rather than by rail. A conveyor belt system was then used to take coal to the coal storage area or directly to the station's boiler rooms. The conveyor belt system consisted of a series of bridges connected by towers. The coal storage area was a large concrete box capable of holding 75,000 tonnes of coal. This had an overhead gantry with a conveyor belt attached to the conveyor belt system, for taking coal from the coal store to the boiler rooms. 21. 22. Thanks for looking battersea part 2 next .................Oldskool
  18. Found Landrover setting up their DAF XF mobile test hill in the middle of Battersea powerstation to test / showcase the new freelanders stop / start system. Setting up the course. On the way up. At the top. That's all I've got. lol.
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