Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'bedford'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • General Discussion & Forum information
    • Forum information
    • Just take a moment & say Hi
    • General Discussion
  • Exploration Forums
    • Military Sites
    • Industrial Locations
    • Hospitals & Asylums
    • Public buildings, Education & Leisure
    • Underground Explores
    • High Places
    • Manors, Mansions & Residential
    • Religious Sites
    • Anything Else
  • Other Forums
    • Video Reports
    • Short Reports
    • Themed Threads

Categories

  • About the Forum
  • Urban Exploring information
  • Photography and camera advice
  • Technical Help

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website URL


Location


Interests

Found 16 results

  1. RAE Bedford Aerodynamics Research Facility Thanks for looking
  2. RAE Bedford 8x8, 3x3 Windtunnels and RAF Thurleigh Tower - Apr/Dec 15 The Explores The first visit was intended to be a quick recce as there had been nothing from the place for a few years, so naturally assumed it was sealed tight... but bloody hell are we glad we checked the place out! Explored with @Session9 and @The Lone Shadow over 2 days last April and accessed the 8x8 tunnel building and the ATC tower at Thurleigh the next day. The 8x8 building complex itself it situated within a live industrial area complete with active security driving/walking around and people/cars generally coming and going constantly. Even the main test area had live offices at one end with PIR’s covering that part stopping me from getting to the bottom of the massive ladders that led to the roof. I found out months later that these were inactive, twat. Various companies have warehouses or office space pretty much encircling the target building so access was lets just say a little tricky! At one point we squeezed and shuffled through pigeon shit and wheelie bins only to find it eventually led back outside again much to our amusement. A bit of perseverance and we were in. The History The origins of RAE Bedford date back to 1944, and Aeronautical Research Committee Report No. ARC 7500 which recommended the setting up of a National Establishment for aeronautical research and development. The Government, in accepting the report, decided to set up the Establishment at Bedford. The NAE became the Royal Aircraft Establishment (RAE) Bedford in 1955 1. Authority to proceed with the construction of the 8x8 Tunnel was given in 1949 and it achieved its first run in 1955. Capable of operation at subsonic speeds and at supersonic speeds from a Mach number of 1.3 to 2.5, the air was driven by a 12-foot diameter, ten-stage axial compressor powered from an 80,000hp [60 Megawatts] electrical source. The advanced aerodynamic capability and quality of the tunnel was such that it was extensively used over a period of forty-six years and served many overseas customers, both military and civil, as well as meeting the British need. Finally surplus to requirements in 2002, its 10,000 tons of steel have hopefully been usefully recycled. All that remains today is he empty infrastructure that contained the tunnel and compressor.... Aerial stock image of the now 'Twinwoods' site.. 2. 3. The first control room we were excited to stumble across, a series of blinded viewing windows allowed personnel to monitor the main compressor hall. Hadn't a wide angle lens then so only a couple of iPhone pano's really and i wish i'd spent a bit more time photographing this bit.. 4. 5. 6. So, i took a wander down the hallway and came across a load of empty bland offices on the left and some interesting bits on the right.. 7. Supply area.. 8. 9. Further down the corridor (which myself and @Urbexbandoned found sealed on a visit months later) I got excited when i read this sign.. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. Moving on from the main site lies the old RAF Thurleigh ATC tower. The Airfield is now packed full of vehicles, new and old, some of the older ones victims of the scrappage scheme but i wasn't hugely interested in these and we headed towards the tower itself via a few other barrack shaped buildings and a wooden radar pylon... 15. These didn't look worth the effort... 16. The tower... Jumping back to Apr 15…we decided to take a look at the ATC tower which was basically situated on the same site but on the other side of the massive multi-runway airfield. A long walk past some smelly sheep and a few dives into the bushes thanks to some farmer spreading equally smelly shit around the neighbouring field, eventually we were at the tower. On first inspection the place looked like it had been recently sealed with nice fresh looking boards all around but with a bit of head/ball scratching and a leap of faith from The Lone Shadow, myself and Session9 were in… We didn’t bother with zillion cars parked on the runways as there were transporters and humans in hi-viz kicking around most of the time.. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. Fast forward to November 2015, Myself and @Urbexbandoned returned once again to check out the 3x3 Tunnel building.. 23. 24. 25/26. 27. 28. 29. 30. The 3x3' Control Room.. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. As always thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated : )
  3. Royal Aircraft Establishment Windtunnels The Explore This was intended to be a quick recce as there has been nothing from this place for a few years now, so naturally assumed it was sealed tight... but bloody hell are we glad we checked the place out! Explored with Session9 and The Lone Shadow. The building complex itself it situated within a very live industrial area complete with active security driving/walking around and people/cars generally coming and going constantly. Even the main test area had live offices at one end with PIR’s covering that part stopping me from getting to the bottom of the massive ladders that led to the roof. Various companies have warehouses or office space pretty much encirlcing the target building so access was lets just say a little tricky! At one point we squeezed and shuffled through pigeon shit only to find it eventually led back outside again much to our amusement. A bit of perseverance and we were in…. The History (Worth a read this one) Construction of RAE Bedford began in 1947, first with new roads, then the first wind tunnels on the “Twinwoods†site and finally the airfield at Thurleigh. Major building work continued to at least 1957. While a considerable expansion of the UK aircraft industry had begun in the mid to late 1930s, it was the demands of World War II, in the early 1940s, which led to its huge growth in capability and size. As the tide of war began to turn in favour of the Allies, thought was given to the nation’s post-war prosperity and because of its technically advanced state, the aircraft sector was singled out as a primary industry for exploitation. However, it was realised that large and expensive research facilities would be required for such exploitation to succeed and as this would be in pursuance of national objectives, the provision of such facilities would have to come from central government sources. Accordingly it was decided to create an entirely new organisation to provide this necessary research capability. To be called the “National Experimental Establishmentâ€, it was initially proposed that it should be sited at Farnborough and embrace the already-existing Royal Aircraft Establishment but ended up here. The wind tunnel provision consisted essentially of four large high-quality research facilities, which would allow the testing of aircraft configurations and components at speeds from around eighty miles per hour up to a Mach number of 5, or five times the speed of sound. These were (in order of completion) the 3x3 supersonic tunnel, the 13x9 low speed tunnel, the 8x8 supersonic tunnel, and the 3x4 high supersonic speed tunnel (HSST). The numerals identify the working section dimensions in feet, width by height. The 8x8 and the 3x4 were the largest tunnels in their Mach number range in Western Europe. A low speed tunnel was also provided specifically to study the spinning characteristics of aircraft, which was a little understood phenomenon at the time. This Vertical Spinning Tunnel (VST) and the 13x9 low speed tunnel are still in use, the VST for skydiving and the 13x9 for the development of racing cars by Red Bull. A number of small tunnels were also built to provide for aerodynamic studies of a more fundamental nature. This place is steeped in history, including the development of the Harrier STOVL aircraft, far too much topmost on here but take a look if you get a chance. We visited the site of the 8x8 Tunnel Buildings.. The Pictures 1. I couldn't stop taking pictures of that fan blade... 2. 3. 4. Under the Plinth looking up... 5. We then decided to have a wander around the other parts chatting that all the equipment that used to be here must've been controlled from somewhere and then this happened...... I pissed a little in my pants and Geoff's jaw hit the floor... 6. Supersonic Wind Tunnel Control Room... 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Spares Supply Area... 13. 14. 15. A random little room... 16. As we mooched around still amazed by that control room I remember joking to Session9 that "imagine that was only a Sub-Control Room and there was another main one somewhere".... then we noticed this sign.... 17. Central Control Room which monitored the power generation side of things... 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. I found this location pretty special, so if you visit please respect it, and switch the lights off when you leave As always thanks for looking and feedback always appreciated Session9’s report here - http://www.oblivionstate.com/forum/showthread.php/8644-RAE-Bedford-April-2015
  4. History In 1946 Thurleigh became the site for the second Royal Aircraft Establishment site. Two new runways were built in the post-war period to accommodate the Bristol Brabazon aircraft (which required a very long runway) that ultimately never went into production. One local road was dropped into a cutting so that it would not sit above the level of the runway. The site had several reasonably large wind tunnels, one supersonic and one large subsonic. It also had a 'drop tower', the drop tower is now used as a skydiving training venue. It was often touted as a possible site for the third London Airport (long before Stansted Airport took on that role). The local community was strongly opposed and many rural buildings were adorned with slogans such as "Thurleigh -NO!", "No! No! No!" and "Maplin Now". The supersonic tunnel was dismantled by 2005 and the building which held the fans and driving motors is now used as the set for the BBC popular science programme, "Bang Goes The Theory". The RAE was deeply involved in the development of Concorde and was also a centre for the development of the Instrument Landing System. Local villages were being circled by airliners in the middle of the night, with planes testing the ILS; the planes would take off, circle, and re-land continually. On 13 March 1961, a Hawker P.1127 (XP831), the prototype of what would become the Hawker Siddeley Harrier, took its first regular flight at RAE Bedford. Also in March 1967 the U-2 flew out of RAE Bedford. During the 1970s RAE Bedford became home to numerous flight simulators, originally using model belts and camera technology, but later utilising computers. In the early 1980s the Advanced Flight Simulator was constructed, allowing pilots to be immersed in a fully three-dimensional moving simulation. Also in the early eighties, RAE Bedford oversaw the development of the Short Take Off & Landing STOL system for the Sea Harrier (the most visible part of which are the up-curved ramps (ski-jumps) on the decks of Royal Navy aircraft carriers). This brought hundreds more takeoffs and landings that circled overhead which was ironic considering that Thurleigh has one of the longest runways in Europe and was previously one of the Avro Vulcan Bomber dispersal bases. In recent years, engine housings and wings were developed/tested for the Airbus. In April 1991 the Royal Aerospace Establishment (as the Royal Aircraft Establishment had been renamed) which operated the airfield at Bedford, was merged with other agencies to become the Defence Research Agency (DRA). The DRA would later become the Defence Evaluation and Research Agency. In February 1994 the airfield was decommissioned after a lengthy study determined that flight operations should be centralised at Boscombe Down in Wiltshire. (Borrowed from Session9) The Explore Visited with Session9 and Hamtagger; loved this explore, entrance was easy as we tried not to look too conspicuous, a strategic maneuver from Hamtagger guaranteed an uninterrupted explore at a nice at a leisurely pace. We went straight to the machine hall and had a nice wander all around some of the walkways and through some of the corridors of the lower level avoiding the PIRS as we went. We spent several minutes shooting up the main fan and admiring its grandeur. Then we headed up to the generating stations and snapped up the control rooms which are in absolute mint condition – Some of the most unique pieces of machinery I have ever come across exploring. Spent many hours wandering around the control rooms whilst trying to figure out what each switch and lever does – good times. Pictures Thanks for viewing everybody The Lone Shadow
  5. History from Ojay's report: In 1946 Thurleigh became the site for the second Royal Aircraft Establishment site Two new runways were built in the post-war period to accommodate the Bristol Brabazon aircraft (which required a very long runway) that ultimately never went into production The site had several reasonably large windtunnels, one supersonic and one large subsonic It also had a 'drop tower', the drop tower is now used as a skydiving training venue The supersonic tunnel was dismantled by 2005 and the building which held the fans and driving motors is now used as the set for the BBC popular science programme, "Bang Goes The Theory" The RAE was deeply involved in the development of Concorde and was also a centre for the development of the Instrument Landing System. Thank You!
  6. Heard about this place a little while ago after watching it on the news while visiting my mum in Bedfordshire. I spoke to her about it and she was telling me about when it was stopped being used and providing the residents of Bedford with water and has been like this ever since. I found this online, gotta be useful to you guys who like your underground stuff. Dont think it will be too long before this training centre takes hold though from how it reads. Looks to open in January 2017. http://m.bedfordtoday.co.uk/news/community-news/elite-police-training-centre-to-be-built-in-old-underground-bedford-reservoir-1-6953308
  7. This is the only history I could find which I can happily say I never stole from Session9 or Hamtagger The site had several reasonably large windtunnels, one supersonic and one large subsonic. It also had a 'drop tower'. The drop tower is now used as a skydiving training venue. The supersonic tunnel was dismantled by 2005 and the building which held the fans and driving motors is now used as the set for the BBC popular science programme, "Bang Goes The Theory". The subsonic tunnel is sometimes used for testing cars on a rolling road.In March 1967 the U-2 flew out of RAE Bedford. It was often touted as a possible site for the third London Airport (long before Stansted Airport took on that role). The local community was strongly opposed and many rural buildings were adorned with slogans such as "Thurleigh -NO!", "No! No! No!" and "Maplin Now". The Explore Well, I have to say thanks to Hamtagger first, if it wasn't for him I would have been wandering aimlessly like a raver in a trance! So cheers mate! After seeing the boys visited this a few weeks back I decided to go, I liked what I saw and I know the area well as I come from Bedfordshire. Access was interesting, I had 2 options, the first was a no go so on to the second, lets put it this way. I did struggle, the only way I can put it is that basically anyone with a large chest would struggle. But anyhow I got in, unscathed and everything intact! I was confronted by that fan, something I ended up with over 50 pics of haha. Got a bit snaphappy. There was lots to see here, lots of really loud noises too, birds which had nested and I kept thinking they were inside the building but no just the echo coming from outside. Found the first control room, door wouldn't open. Carried on, now I know that I probably just didn't push hard enough so a great excuse for a revist! Then after some exploring found the other, was quite nice, a LOT of dial/button/switch porn. I actually spent over an hour in here. After this I ventured back down to the main bit, found some old paperwork, some test tube thingymabobs which made a nice pic and then carried on snapping. All in all quite a relaxing explore. I loved it. I am really sorry if you get bored with the pics LOL! If your not asleep by this point, thanks for looking!
  8. RAE BEDFORD - APRIL 2015 History In 1946 Thurleigh became the site for the second Royal Aircraft Establishment site. Two new runways were built in the post-war period to accommodate the Bristol Brabazon aircraft (which required a very long runway) that ultimately never went into production. One local road was dropped into a cutting so that it would not sit above the level of the runway. The site had several reasonably large wind tunnels, one supersonic and one large subsonic. It also had a 'drop tower', the drop tower is now used as a skydiving training venue. It was often touted as a possible site for the third London Airport (long before Stansted Airport took on that role). The local community was strongly opposed and many rural buildings were adorned with slogans such as "Thurleigh -NO!", "No! No! No!" and "Maplin Now". The supersonic tunnel was dismantled by 2005 and the building which held the fans and driving motors is now used as the set for the BBC popular science programme, "Bang Goes The Theory". The RAE was deeply involved in the development of Concorde and was also a centre for the development of the Instrument Landing System. Local villages were being circled by airliners in the middle of the night, with planes testing the ILS; the planes would take off, circle, and re-land continually. On 13 March 1961, a Hawker P.1127 (XP831), the prototype of what would become the Hawker Siddeley Harrier, took its first regular flight at RAE Bedford. Also in March 1967 the U-2 flew out of RAE Bedford. During the 1970s RAE Bedford became home to numerous flight simulators, originally using model belts and camera technology, but later utilising computers. In the early 1980s the Advanced Flight Simulator was constructed, allowing pilots to be immersed in a fully three-dimensional moving simulation. Also in the early eighties, RAE Bedford oversaw the development of the Short Take Off & Landing STOL system for the Sea Harrier (the most visible part of which are the up-curved ramps (ski-jumps) on the decks of Royal Navy aircraft carriers). This brought hundreds more takeoffs and landings that circled overhead which was ironic considering that Thurleigh has one of the longest runways in Europe and was previously one of the Avro Vulcan Bomber dispersal bases. In recent years, engine housings and wings were developed/tested for the Airbus. In April 1991 the Royal Aerospace Establishment (as the Royal Aircraft Establishment had been renamed) which operated the airfield at Bedford, was merged with other agencies to become the Defence Research Agency (DRA). The DRA would later become the Defence Evaluation and Research Agency. In February 1994 the airfield was decommissioned after a lengthy study determined that flight operations should be centralised at Boscombe Down in Wiltshire. The airfield has since been divided into two parts; The southern part is now known as Thurleigh Business Park, and includes the runway, which is currently used for the mass storage of new cars. The northern part is now Bedford Autodrome which also houses Thurleigh Museum. The explore It was about time that this local beauty spot was given a re-visit, so off we went to soak up some derp. Enjoyed this one, lots to look at in un-chaved condition. Explored with Hamtagger and a non member. 1. The wind tunnels can be seen in the centre of this picture. These were dismantled shortly after the main tunnel closed and can be seen their scale is breathtaking - nearly three stories high in some places. 2. The 'machine hall'. The propeller shape is a prop. 3. A photograph from the early 1960's showing the main drive compressor. The walk way marked 'x' is shown for comparison in the next photo. 4. The 'x' marks the high level walkway shown in the previous picture and together with yours truly who stands at 6' 4" plus, the scale of the tunnel can only be appreciated. 5. 6. Some props left over from tv/film sets. 7. 8. The other larger (13 feet i believe) wind tunnel exit. The plugs or bungs in their place are made from wood. 9. 10. 11. Some good reading here. 12. 13. 14. Towers of the generating plant. Interesting space behind these towers, as we found out! 15. Control room for the generating station. 16. One of my favorites of the day. 17. Across the airfield (not literally!) we went for a peep at RAE Bedford's new Control Tower which had just opened in this picture of 1957. 18. 19. 20. 21. See of cars instead of planes. 22. Nature now in control. 23. Thanks for looking folks !
  9. Just a quick hello to one and all! With the advent of a new year, i thought it was time to try a new site. And what a great site this is! I have been mooching for a good while now and its always a pleasure to meet up with familiar faces and meet new people in this game. Wishing you all, a brilliant and safe MOOCHTASTIC year! Geoff
  10. this has to be near the top of my explores this place was amazing amazing day out! full set :http://www.flickr.com/photos/samcain/sets/72157631525817953/ abit of history from the good old wiki http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAE_Bedford i know my school moto is "Aim Higher" but this is pushing it for me chairs the runway/carpark i think this was part of a laser guided landing system for airports (testing) they had a artist!!!! one of the best views love the design of this nice spot to sleep (the the radar tower) RIP mini i think this was a ford focus ??? the sea of cars had to wait out the rain in a 2001 merc #RollingInStyle star trek style respect to the person who made this my mates amazing idea was to kick this to see if it would open, i dont think you will be surprised with the outcome coolest hand dryer i have ever seen
  11. i dont know much about this place but there are local 2 stories about this place 1 is that it was linked to the mafia and the owner of the house went to prison for life and his wife couldnt handle it and ran away and just left the house open 2 is that it had chinese writing in the walls and couldnt be knocked down i have know idea if any of there are true but if one of there are it would make in a hell of a explore *(if there's any spelling/grammar mistakes sorry about that but my dyslexic )* full set :http://www.flickr.com/photos/samcain/sets/72157631517771142/ some one spent alot of money on this house really wanted to explore in there but it had completely collapsed and there were to many bushes in the way but there seemed to be some cool stuff in there nice try fence nice brick work done in the basement is that some chinese writing never forget some cottages we stumbled across as we were leaving no roof very different very 70's handy another birds skull love find burnt/damaged gas cylinders
  12. Not a lot of history to be found on this one, the theatre was named in honour of Mrs Patricia Bowen-West OBE Doctor of Education at the De Montfort University, Bedford Visited with Skeleton Key and Tstranger Thanks for looking
  13. De Montfort University is named after Simon de Montfort, a 13th century Earl of Leicester credited with establishing the first parliament in 1265 The De Montfort University Bedford was the sister university to De Montfort University Leicester, and together they made up one of the largest universities in the UK. Over 3,000 undergraduate and postgraduate students studied at Bedford, along with another 20,000 or so at the Leicester centre. In 2006 there was an educational merger with the Bedford campus of DeMontfort University its name was changed to The University of Bedfordshire and relocated to a central site leaving this behind. My Daughter nearly soiled herself when she walked around the corner and saw this.
  14. The Cardington aircraft hangers (or more correctly termed as ‘sheds’) dominate the surrounding countryside landscape of Bedfordshire for miles where they can be spotted looming out from the horizon. Shed no.1 was constructed in 1917 and no2 was completed a few years later in 1928, both hangers contain their own micro-climates and if you are lucky enough to find yourself inside one of these on a dry day out you may find it raining on the inside. The front sliding doors weigh over 80 tonnes of metal each and the hangers in length extend to over 247m and rise to just over 59 metres, both sheds still remain the largest in Western Europe and could house 2 Wembley Stadiums with leftover space for a hooligan bar. These sheds which were designed and built by hand required vast space to house an aircraft significantly large enough to compete with the monstrous Zepplins, so steel portal frames were used with pin joints to hold up the crown and all side walls of the structure. The death count during their assembly remains vague however inevitably dozens did fall to their deaths during the construction period. Hanger no.1 was home to the famous R101 which crashed on its maiden voyage in Beauvais, north of France killing hundreds of passengers flying over to India. You can just see my 15 year old daughter standing to the left of the gap in the doors. This gives you some idea of the scale of the place Yeah right!!! My mate P7 can be seen down on the floor These are the blocks that the Airships were tethered to. This is the outside of the doors. The door operator sits in the shed and operates the motors, the cog wheels pull the doors along the giant "bike chain" that lays on the ground.
  15. Starting in 1946, construction work began on the airfield to turn the site into what became known as the Royal Aeronautical Establishment, Bedford. The runway was extended in the post-war period to accommodate the Bristol Brabazon aircraft (which required a very long runway) that ultimately never went into production. One local road was dropped into a cutting so that it would not sit above the level of the runway. It was the site of experimental aircraft development and was once described as “the finest research and development establishment outside the U.S.A." This building is a "Kinetheodolite tower" (Cine Camera Tower) there was a further tower located elsewhere on the field. Two beams were projected up onto a taking off aircraft which would then lock the camera's on and follow it around ( hence the observatory dome)while trials were carried out over the field! the data being fed to computers for trajectory analysis A trip down memory lane here. There was and old rover abandoned near one of the buildings with these inside, I remember it being my job to lick and stick these when my Mum had been shopping
  16. Thurleigh was built for RAF Bomber Command in 1941 by W & C French Ltd in 1941. On 7th September 1942 the 306th Group started to arrive; with some of their B17s flying in the following week. From October 1942, the 306th Group mounted a long and arduous offensive suffering many losses. The Group finally completed their long war on 19th April 1945 which was their 342nd mission; the second highest for any B17 Group. During its time at Thurleigh over 9,600 sorties had been flown with the loss of 171 aircraft in action and over 22,500 tons of bombs were dropped. In 1946 construction work began on the airfield to turn the site into what became know as the Royal Aeronautical Establishment, Bedford. The airfield was finally closed in 1997. This is the control tower
×