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Found 7 results

  1. https://imgur.com/gallery/iy0gFth Figured I'd just link the album here since it's eaisier, not used since the 70s
  2. Wasn't sure whether to post a report from here or not. My photos aren't all that, but it was a pretty fun night so here's my take on it. All these are hand held shots, I may go back and take some proper ones at some point, but for me it was more about seeing the place than photographing it nicely this time round. Myself, Elliot5200 and The_Raw had driven up from London and met Merryprankster somewhere near Lincoln earlier that day. We'd scarcely had more than a few hours sleep, having done another 3 places in the previous 24 hours. Well you've got to make the best of these weekends, petrol is expensive! We eventually arrive here at some ridiculous hour of the morning, several hours later than planned due to overstaying at our previous place. We waste no time in heading for our access point, all as keen as each other to do what they whole point of the trip was in the first place - climb the blast furnace. We had a rough idea where to go, with a little bit of help from someone, but as ever with a place like this it all looks very different at ground level to google maps. Also despite the fact the blast furnace is pretty damn big, you couldn't actually see it from the side of the site we were on somehow. Anyway after a little bit of "I think it's that way" and "I'm sure that bit is this bit on the map" and "is that a car? yes that's a car" we found ourselves on the site, pretty glad to have made it this far without being detected, but mindful that we still had a way to go. There's a lot more on this site than the blast furnace itself and it was difficult not to get distracted and climb some of the other structures. We were on limited time however so keeping our eyes peeled for the slightest sign of activity, we cautiously made our way further into the site, past the massive MAN gas holder and into pipe city edging towards our goal. This was our first proper glimpse of the structure as we rounded a corner. Getting closer Quick dash across no mans land We discuss different possibilities for actually climbing the thing, but in the end decide to just go for broke and head up the stairs. Cheeky buggers however have cut off some of the staircases, but not all of them. The furnace is basically one gigantic climbing frame once you're on it, so moving around once you've gone up a few floors isn't a problem. Saying that we did have to get a bit creative at one or two points to get to where we wanted to, it just made the whole thing more fun. It's only when you actually get close to these things that you realise how fooking massive they really are and the scale of the industry becomes apparent. Up we go A maze of walkways In the middle of the beast Passed by the very heart of the machine on the way up, we would return here later, but for now heading up was the priority. As we climbed higher and started to become a bit more relaxed in our surroundings, it allowed time for a little contemplation of where we actually were. It was strange to think that just over 2 months ago this impressive piece of engineering was churning out metal at a rate of many hundreds of tons per day, manned by a team of highly skilled and experienced engineers who more than likely took pride in their jobs and in their place of work. All that was gone in an instant. What was also quite sad is they're not wasting any time in dismantling the place, that is quite evident. This really is the end of steel making here, they'll never build any new ones of these and there's not many left in the UK. I mistakenly thought this was the only one left in the UK, turns out there are others - however this is the biggest. I do wonder what the future holds for the area as steel making has been a cornerstone in this part of the UK for generations. GAS! Crane Looking down Massive conveyor that would have fed the raw materials to the furnace. Pipetastic. I didn't realise until I got home and read about blast furnaces a bit that one of the most important aspects of a successful furnace is actually cooling it effectively. All this massive maze of pipework is in fact the cooling system. For those that are interested, there's a schematic on the wall of the office next door. The 'Brain' as the_raw likes to call it. I think it's very apt. Workshop This is the area where the pig iron would have been drained out of the furnace into whatever recepticle it was to go into. From Redcar, a lot of it was transported by rail to the works up the road where it was manufactured into steel. In control.This was where the extraction of the iron was controled from. There's two sets of controls, one for the "Taphole drill" which really does what it says and drills a tap into the furnace and the other for the "Clay gun" which seals up the taphole after the extraction of the iron is complete. I think there were 4 extraction points on the furnace, I'm guessing there were 2 this side and 2 the other as this has controls for numbers 1 and 4 in it. And that's pretty much it. Mission accomplished. Exit is reverse of entry, but somehow always a lot faster. Back to the car to the nearest McDonalds for breakfast, then a few hours kip in the nearest layby before heading home. It was an awesome weekend, but I get the feeling we're not finished with this place yet as there's a lot more that I want to see here before it all disappears for good. Thanks for looking! Maniac.
  3. I don't really understand how stuff like this works but I think it just gets really hot and then farts big turds of metal out of it's arse. I CAN tell you one thing though, it's fucking huge and it's fucking epic running around it with your mates in the middle of the night! Founded by Dorman Long in 1917, the steel produced here was used to build structures including the Sydney Harbour Bridge, Tyne Bridge and the Auckland Harbour Bridge. Under the socialist plans of the post-Second World War Labour Party, in 1967 Dorman Long was absorbed into the newly created nationalised company, British Steel Corporation. After privatisation under Margaret Thatcher's Conservative Party in 1988 to form British Steel plc, in 1999 the company merged with Netherlands-based steel maker Koninklijke Hoogovens to form Corus Group. Corus utilised the site for basic oxygen steelmaking, using iron produced at the company's Redcar blast furnace. In 2007, Corus was bought by Tata Steel. Tata stopped production in 2009 and 1,700 jobs were lost at the plant. On 24 February 2011, the steelworks was purchased by Thai-based Sahaviriya Steel Industries (SSI). On 15 April 2012 the plant was officially reopened. On 18 September 2015, production was paused due to the decline in steel prices. On 28 September 2015, the plant was "mothballed" amid poor steel trading conditions across the world and a drop in steel prices. On 2 October, the owner of the site, SSI UK, entered liquidation. On 12 October 2015 the receiver announced there was no realistic prospect of finding a buyer and the coke ovens would be extinguished. 1. I didn't get any usable externals so nicked this from google 2. After a Speedy entrance we found ourselves making our way up through the bowels of the furnace 3. 4. 5. 6. Quite fancy popping down to the bottom of here next time (look out for Part 2 of 36 coming soon ) 7. 8. It's difficult to capture the sheer size of this thing 9. 10. 11. This is my favourite shot from the evening's proceedings. 12. 13. You could still feel hot air coming from the top of these chimneys 14. Heading back down we had a nose around in this large area around the 'Brain' as I like to call it. 15. 16. This workshop was close by and a few other little rooms 17. Worker's coat 18. 19. Control Room 20. 21. 22. The Brain 23. Nothing I've seen in Belgium compared to the size of this, both sides looked like this.... We only scratched the surface of this huge site on this occasion but in Parts 2-36 I hope to cover everything from the kitchen toaster to the men's urinals. No stone will be left unturned I assure you of that. Thanks to @Maniac, @Merryprankster and Elliot5200 for a great night, it was a blast
  4. Bit of history; Founded by Dorman Long in 1917, the steel produced was used to build structures including the Sydney Harbour Bridge, Tyne Bridge and the Auckland Harbour Bridge. Under the socialist plans of the post-Second World War Labour Party, in 1967 Dorman Long was absorbed into the newly created nationalised company, British Steel Corporation. After privatisation under Margaret Thatcher's Conservative Party in 1988 to form British Steel plc, in 1999 the company merged with Netherlands-based steel maker Koninklijke Hoogovens to form Corus Group. Corus utilised the site for basic oxygen steelmaking, using iron produced at the company's Redcar blast furnace. In 2007, Corus was bought by Tata Steel. SSI: 2012–present In light of the termination of a large contract in 2009, Tata stopped production and 1,700 jobs were lost at the plant. On 24 February 2011, the steelworks was purchased by Thai-based SSI. On 15 April 2012 the plant was officially reopened. On 18 September 2015, production was paused due to the decline in steel prices. On 28 September 2015, the plant was "mothballed" amid poor steel trading conditions across the world and a drop in steel prices. On 2 October, the owner of the site, SSI UK, entered liquidation. On 12 October 2015 the receiver announced there was no realistic prospect of finding a buyer and the coke ovens would be extinguished. The explore; So on what I am pretty sure was the grimmest night of 2015 with the wind approaching 60mph myself and Raz made the trip to Redcar. At first we had only planned to recce the site in order to return for another night... but after walking for 3 hours amongst the sand dunes we silently decided we had come too far not to succeed. It took a lot of waiting, crawling and sprinting between cover and at one point laying on our backs with the security truck headlights pointing straight at us from about 10ft away to get close, and one final scramble up a very loose rock face and we were in. It took us just over 4 hours to get in from leaving the car, bur being stood under that brain in the centre, made the bruises, the aches, and the coke in our hair and eyes so worth it. Getting out was a rushed job, neither of us wishing to stay any longer as we were both exhausted by his point and somehow, we pulled it off. Massive confidence boost for us and this place is honestly the first place I've been truly proud of pulling off. Waiting for the next patrol to pass... Thanks for looking
  5. For as long as I can remember being interested in this hobby, one site had always been at the top spot of, or hovering just below the top spot of my 'to do list', and that location was the HF6 Blast Furnace in Belgium. For ages I would sit admiring photos of it's enormous rusting beauty, never having got there myself. Well that has finally changed! It did take me four attempts however - my first visit we were spotted by pesky nosey neighbours so scarpered, the second visit we ran into contractors entering the site just as we were about to, and the third attempt would have gone off perfectly if a blizzard hadn't decided to happen the day we had planned to do it...but was it worth the wait? Oh god yes, a million times over. By far and away my favourite location I have done to date out of all the 200+ I have explored. This time we parked up and proceeded to spy a dishevelled-looking hobo wandering up and down the street outside our access point, we didn't take much notice but as we walked along he saw us with our gear and asked us what we were doing, I mimed a photo taking acion and he piped up in near perfect English 'oh you want to take photos in there?' and then proceeded to tell us exactly how to go about getting into the place! Best hobo ever! Once in the site it took us a good 45 minutes to work out the way over the internal razor wire fence (nasty stuff!) but by a stroke of luck when we were on the verge of packing it in we worked it out, and the rest is history. Filthy dirty, oily, coal dust-covered and a very sweaty couple of hours later we were back outside the site badly in need of breakfast, all of which means I'll be going back to finish the rest of the enormous site off at some stage I took a lot of photos so here is a fair few of them. Sadly my photos aren't the best they could be, I mostly stuck to handheld stuff as my jaw was too busy being on the floor for the most part - and as you'll see the lighting wasn't the best either... More here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157646063466173/
  6. Scattergun and myself took on this beast of an explore with the goal of climbing the huge tower that dominates the landscape of the city. Baron & Lost decided bumbling around in a basement would be more fun. Arriving at our drop off point on the hottest day of the trip, around 42 degrees, around 100 degree in the car with the blowers stuck on full heat, we attempted to make quick entry. I was half way over a wall when the local tut tut mechanic was shouting at us, luckily Baron used his charm and multi lingual techniques to convey to the nut job we were only there to take pictures, he trundled off round the corner happily enough. SG and myself soon found ourselves in what seemed to be the dumping ground for the blast furnace with many old diggers, bulldozers and lorries just left to rot away. Deciding to check out a couple of the buildings before heading for the beast, and cause it was in the shade we ventured into what appeared to be a working blacksmiths / repair shop for large vehicles. It was time to head for the main goal, whilst wandering around the previous buildings / sheds we kept on hearing sirens and horns, we were concerned the site was still partially in use. Not to be perturbed we ventured onwards, navigating serious amounts of fences lined with hefty amounts of razor wire. We were within the main yard. Trundling along in the blistering heat we headed down some rail way tracks, but to realise we were getting closer to the sirens, a quick double back and went for another route. Through another building and we had the monsterous tower in site, but also noticing a lot of lights on, shit there was on site security. Fuck it was the joint decision, we ain't heading back now, so headed in. We couldn't seem to find the actual base of the furnace, so we decided to head for the top. It was high, very high, I can definitely say this is the highest I have ever climbed, and it wasn't for the faint hearted, open mesh grating all the way, it took us around a hour to climb up, but it was well worth it. We had to stop at the top of the Cowper Stoves where the stairs finally stopped, we took a rest and took some quick pics. Onward we went crossing the gantry with nothing but mesh grating between us and probably 150ft to the ground (probably the worst part for me). The stairs to the top went on and on, seemingly never ending. But finally we made it, and it was fucking high. At an estimate I would say around 400ft + off the ground we reached the top. It was now clear to see that the sirens were actually coming from the neighbouring site. But still unsure if there was security there, we still hadn't seen anyone. A quick check of the phone to see Baron badgering us too see how long we would be, we headed back down. But not before walking across one more gantry and into what many come to see. Heading for the exit, we came to the conclusion there was no security as many power displays and lights were still on. But nonetheless it was a great explore. Thanks for taking the time to look.
  7. Evening folks, Just finished processing and editing another set from our mad trip across Lux, France and Belgium. Part of our road trip across Luxembourg and France with some brief time in Belgium was a few nice locations in France. We had a big list of locations in the sat nav and while checking out a decommissioned power station and running into security dogs and finding cameras everywhere, we spotted this impressive structure on the other side of the motorway. Tracing our steps back and following the structure in the distance, we navigated to the vicinity of the place and managed to arrive on the site to find people everywhere and a barbecue happening. Apparently, it is not only a park for the public but a tourist place where they light the insides of the structure up and hold concerts and events. After a brief chat with the greeters on the desk, we were informed that the site was open at certain times and we were welcome to come back another day. Noting that the opening times was at 2pm on a Sunday afternoon and today was Saturday, we aimed to come back and access through an earlier spotted hole in the fence at the back of the site in the morning. After visiting and photographing another location, we found a hotel and had food for the night with the intention to visit in the morning. It was apparently a working blast furnace and after being decommissioned was tidied up and used as a tourist attraction. We arrived and accessed the site, my one friend opting to stay outside and photograph the exterior while myself and one other decided to climb in and attempt something within the structure (within reason). I say in reason as all the workways were cut off, hence we had to climb some areas but avoided going too far as it was quite rusty further up. In the meantime while we were exploring this, one of the crew on his first trip fell over and put a rock right through his main camera. Two days before coming home meant that any further shots would be taken with his newer compact type camera and by sense using a camera that still working but was damaged and had no viewfinder or display. After an hour or so in the warm sunshine, we retraced our steps out and made our way back to the car. Not before having a brief jog back to the fence as we thought we were spotted. I still have no idea what it is called to this day. Some of the photos are below. Thanks for looking in.
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