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Found 12 results

  1. Mineral Springs Bath House History The construction of the Mineral Springs Bath House began in 1907. This was in order to bring in more tourism and wealth into the area. The town it was built in was an excellent location to host a bath house, as it was well known for it's rich mineral water sources which was believed to have medicinal properties. During the start of the 20th century mineral baths were a very fashionable and popular leisure activity. It took 3 years to build, with the help of local residents and neighbouring villages. It was finally unveiled with a ceremony in 1911. The materials which were used for the interior were designed in Vienna, France and Belgium and it was the most expensive healing bath in Bulgaria at that current time. Typical to most bath houses, it was separated into two sections, one for the men and another for the women. Both areas accommodated for it's visitors with a large circular pool, changing rooms and 10 bathtubs. The baths also provided central heating facilities, the main parts of the building were kept consistently at 15°C, the changing rooms at 28°C and the baths themselves were 32°C. The bath house was also equip with a clinic, admin offices and a large laundry room. Sadly the Mineral Springs Baths eventually closed in 2001, due to the decline in interest and popularity along with the lack of investment by the local government. Visit As always, visited with @darbians on a long weekend trip to Bulgaria. We were both feeling pretty optimistic once we'd seen the grand looking exterior on arrival and fortunately the interior certainly lived up to our expectations. Externals Internals If you've got this far, thanks for reading
  2. This was a completely accidental find, but definitely one that impressed. We had stopped in a little village for a few beers late in the afternoon, and spotted it in the distance. We went to investigate, and after an hour of wondering round outside - trying every window, door and balcony we were about to give up until we found a way in. It seems someone has been keeping an eye on it - security signs everywhere, PIRs inside etc.. and after about 30 seconds of being inside we heard a dreaded alarm. Not wanting to get on the wrong side of the Bulgarian plod we made a quick escape, and after hiding nearby for over half an hour no one had come to check it, and the alarms had stopped. By this point we were losing the light, so a quick browse on Airbnb we'd sorted a room for the night, with the intension to come back the following morning. The following morning come, and we were back - wise and prepared. Someone had been there since we'd left, as there were tyre tracks and a multitude of footprints outside. We made our way in, careful to avoid the sensors and shot all we could without triggering them. It seems this place has been abandoned since 2007, but with way the furniture has been left, fully furnished rooms and running electricity/lights, you'd have thought it closed yesterday! The time come when there was no other way - the ringing of the alarm filled the air as we grabbed the last few shots of this beautifully furnished hotel, before a mad dash back to the car and a rather long drive back to the airport! As always, thanks for looking!
  3. Buzludzha is a historical peak in the Central Balkan Mountains, Bulgaria and is 1,432 metres (4,698 feet) high. In 1868 it was the place of the final battle between Bulgarian rebels led by Hadji Dimitar and Stefan Karadzha and the Ottoman Empire. The House-Monument of the Bulgarian Communist Party (or informally, the Buzludzha Monument) was built on the peak by the Bulgarian communist regime. It commemorated the events of 1891, when a group of socialists led by Dimitar Blagoev assembled secretly in the area to form an organised socialist movement that led to the founding of the Bulgarian Social Democratic Party, a forerunner of the Bulgarian Communist Party. Construction of the monument began on 23 January 1974, under architect Georgi Stoilov: a former mayor of Sofia and co-founder of the Union of Architects in Bulgaria. TNT was used to level the mountain peak into a stable foundation, reducing the mountain's height from 1,441 metres (4,728 feet) to 1,432 metres (4,698 feet). The monument was built at a cost of 14,186,000 leva, which by today's rates is roughly equivalent to $35 million. The monument was opened on 23 August 1981, and since 1989 hasn't been maintained by the Bulgarian Government. We arrived here about lunchtime on a Sunday, and navigating the mountain roads (most of which was spent going sideways round corners in a shitty Renault Clio) we made it and parked up. The trek up is monumental - the snow was several feet deep, and it seemed to go on forever. Eventually we made it, and i'd have done it a thousand times over for the view at the top. It was incredible. We didn't hang around making our way in - externals could be done later, but the main room was what I really wanted. We spent a couple of hours inside, enjoying the views and there was only one thing left - the tower. I done this part solo, and 31 rusty metal ladders later I made it to the top. The view was absolutely breathtaking. It was so peaceful, and after climbing onto a concrete pillar I just sat there for a while - taking in the view. I snapped a few pics and started the climb back down. By the time we made it outside there were some other explorers trying to get in, so after a brief hello and a few externals we started the journey back down. As always, thanks for looking!
  4. A Small home in Belgium, was really nice to found the leg
  5. How to post a report using Flickr Flickr seems to change every time the wind changes direction so here's a quick guide on how to use it to post a report... Step 1 - Explore and take pictures Step 2 - Upload your chosen pictures to Flickr like this.. Step 3 - Once your images are successfully uploaded to flickr choose a category for the location that you have visited... Step 4 - Then "Start New Topic".. You will then see this screen... Step 5 - Now you are ready to add the image "links", known as "BBcodes", which allow your images to display correctly on forums.. Step 6 - Then click "select" followed by "view on photo page".. Now select "Share" shown below.. Step 7-13 - You will then see this screen... Just repeat those steps for each image until you're happy with your report and click "submit topic"! You can edit your report for 24 hours after posting to correct errors. If you notice a mistake outside of this window contact a moderator and they will happily rectify the problem for you
  6. History The Buzludzha Monument aka The House of the Bulgarian Communist Party is a huge concrete circular structure that many say resembles an abandoned UFO. It sits derelict on top of the Buzludzha mountain slowly crumbling away as it deals with lack of maintenance and fierce winter conditions. The Monument opened in 1981 after being built at a cost of 14 186 000 leva (around 7 000 000 €) but after the fall of the Iron Curtain in 1989 only 8 years later the Communist Headquarters closed and began to fall into disrepair. The master builder was General Delcho Delchev who was in charge of the Stara Zagora civil engineering section. The lead architect of the project was Guéorguy Stoilov. Several famous painters and sculptors also contributed to the intricate decoration. Above the door in bold red paint is the harrowing message: ‘Never forget your past’ while alongside it is the more satirical: ‘Enjoy Communism’, in the style of the Coca-Cola logo clearly added by graffiti artists post closure. The building still holds a lot of significance to the communist party within Bulgaria and each year on the first Sunday in August around 30-40,000 people gather there as part of a socialist party meeting. Our Visit The House of the Bulgarian Communist Party also known as the Buzludzha Monument is one of those places that stands out as being something a bit special and was always a big location on the to-do list, but being so far away in Bulgaria it was just put off time and time again until finally we arranged a SOCC trip :). I’d seen hundreds of photos of this place from all seasons but I was really keeping my fingers crossed that we’d have some snow! Given our travel dates in March it was a long shot and as we travelled across a significant portion of Bulgaria the weather was pretty warm and sunny… Fortunately as we approached the Buzludzha mountain we could see that the peak had a nice dusting of the white stuff! So much so that we couldn’t even get our cars up to the hotel and our base camp for the next few days! After ditching the cars and walking the rest of the way to the hotel we ditched our bags and headed straight up to the monument to catch what was left of the daylight. The Buzludzha, given its location right on the top of the mountain, is very visible for quite some distance as you approach but the sheer size of the structure doesn’t set in until you walk up to the main building. The tower seems much larger than it appears from further away and even more so when you climb the ladders to the top! Once inside we made our way up the main set of stairs into the large circular auditorium which would have previously been filled with hundreds of communist party members. Undeniably the building is now in very poor condition with only the steel reinforced concrete structure remaining and a few original features from the mosaic pictures on the walls of the main room and the iconic emblem on the ceiling, still in the white cover of the snow this place was still very impressive. As it began to get dark I hunted around for access to the tower and made my way up to catch the sunset, I thought some of the other guys were following but I ended up up there alone for a good 45 minutes watching the sun go down over the surrounding mountain tops. Definitely one of those unforgettable moments in life! Shortly after it was back down, back to the hotel and time for cheap beer and local moonshine :D. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. Higher res copies of the photos and quite a few more over on my website: http://www.proj3ctm4yh3m.com/urbex/2015/11/28/urbex-buzludzha-communist-party-monument-bulgaria-march-2015/
  7. Resembling a UFO perched high on a peak of the Balkan Mountains, the House of the Bulgarian Communist Party was a built as a monument to commemorate the founding of the Bulgarian Social Democratic Party. After a quarter of a century of abandonment the monument has been stripped and looted. In 1891 the Turks were being expelled from Bulgaria marking the end of 500 years of Ottoman Rule in the country. A secret meeting took place on the peak of Buzludzha mountain led by Dimitar Blagoev. The meeting would ultimately lay down the foundations for what would become the Bulgarian Communist Party. 90 years later the BCP built their headquarters as a monument at that very location. Sunrise at Buzludzha Mountain Taking seven years to construct, and costing over 16 million Bulgarian Levs (almost £7 million), mainly collected from the Bulgarian people by the state, the monument stands at 107-metres-high and features a huge flying-saucer shaped auditorium. The building itself was designed by Georgi Stoilov and more than 60 artists worked on the designs for extensive tiled murals that adorn the interior. The giant tower features a red Soviet star on each side – three times larger than the Soviet star at the Kremlin. The front of the building was inscribed with verses from “The International†and “The Worker’s March†– political songs that were meaningful in the communist era. Inside featured many marble surfaces, and the staircases were decorated with red cathedral glass. The 15-metre-high main hall was decorated with a 500 sq. metre mosaic featuring portraits of prominent communist figures Marx, Engels, Lenin and the Bulgarian communist leader Todor Zhivkov. The dome ceiling was covered with thirty tones of copper. The centrepiece of the ceiling features a hammer and sickle. The words surrounding the image read “The proletariats of every country join togetherâ€. Many other phrases are written around the building, some original and many more added post abandonment. Many years ago the slogan “forget your past†was painted in graffiti above the front doors. The word “never†has recently been added preceding the original words. The site was widely regarded as one of the greatest icons of the communist world at the time. The end of the communist era in Bulgaria in 1989 saw a change in attitudes towards the many monuments throughout the land, and ownership of the monument at Buzludzha was transferred to the state from the Bulgarian Communist Party in 1991. The state promptly closed the building, just 10 years after its construction and the site has been abandoned ever since. 24 years on, the building has been stripped bare and looters have taken everything of value. In the wintertime the whole structure fills with snow and takes on a post-apocalyptic appearance. But despite this the monument remains as a prominent landmark, a testament to the 6,000 workers who constructed it. Whether the Bulgarians like it or not, this communist-era legacy stands proud. Verses from political songs on the front of the building All the walls were covered with murals, but most were hidden by snow View from the 107m high tower Inside the star on the tower Star trail Capturing the movement of the stars in the background over a 1 hour period
  8. Havent posted for what seems an eternity ! So this was a trip to Bulgaria that 7 of us went on in March. Wont go into the history as its out there Small copy and paste from wiki Buzludzha is a historical peak in the Central Balkan Mountains, Bulgaria and is 1441 metres high (4728 ft). In 1868 it was the place of the final battle between Bulgarian rebels led by Hadji Dimitar and Stefan Karadzha and the Ottoman Empire. The Buzludzha Monument on the peak was built by the Bulgarian communist regime to commemorate the events in 1891 when the socialists led by Dimitar Blagoev assembled secretly in the area to form an organised socialist movement with the founding of the Bulgarian Social Democratic Party, a fore-runner of the Bulgarian Communist Party. The Monument was opened in 1981.No longer maintained by the Bulgarian government, it has fallen into disuse. The monument was built at a cost of 14 186 000 leva. Buzludzha can be reached by two side roads from the Shipka Pass either a 16 km (10 mi) road from Kazanlak or a 12 km (7 mi) road coming north from Gabrovo. Now the monument is abandoned and vandalised. As the roof of the building is heavily damaged, the main entrance of the building has been closed for the public. (cough cough) So as said 7 of us went, 2 traveled from Glasgow (got knows why Nikon came up here to fly down to Stansted lol) met another 4 in Stansted then our final party member met us in Plovdiv after travelling from Belgium. So many laughs had on this trip, ranging from 1 party member going missing at night, after getting bladdered and trying 4x4`s in the pitch black, to absolute nonsense conversations after too much cheap booze. For me it was what a trip is all about, fun fun fun and seeing and shooting a pretty cool place. We spent 3 days/2 nights at the base of the monument, personally only went up twice, but I know others done it many times at all times of the day and night. Anyways, mixed bag, in the order they were shot Not happy up here !!! 200ft pitch black climb then 100ft on see-thru ladders, anyone who knows me knows I dont do heights !! Pretty chuffed I got to the top tbh, but bob hope I was going out on the ledge !! cheers The Baron
  9. I think almost everyone knows it now. The monument on the 1441 m high mountain was opened in 1981 to the 1300 anniversary of the founding of the state of Bulgaria by the Communist Party (Socialist Workers Party). It's the largest ideologically motivated building in the country. After a 2.5 hour flight to Bucharest / Romania end of December 2013, I needed for the nearly 300 km drive (partly in fog and on icy mountain roads) another six hours, until I had finally arrived ... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
  10. Evening all, On our run of countries visited this year, one of our trips on the way to see Budzludzha saw us visiting a few other locations. Pretty much in the same condition as the mig school but the sheep were using the ground floor. Not much left and had to be really creative with what was left. Thanks for looking in.
  11. Hey all, Another location finished albeit a small one. What was quite a hot morning after an epic 5 hours in Buzludzha, we hit this school which had a MIG in the grounds. The school itself was a bit of a mess and didn't hold for much epicness so we took little photos and had a rest outside on a rickety old bench in the sun before heading back to the hotel for the final evening before home. On with the photos. Thanks for looking in.
  12. Evening all, Part of our trip in August to Bulgaria to visit Buzludzha, we visited this old theatre. No history found but a nice explore while waiting for the coach parties to leave the mountain and the roadblocks to be lifted. Thanks for looking in.
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