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Found 59 results

  1. Visited during a trip to Wales in May with @The_Raw When we arrived, an elderly man was sitting in front of the former church, which is on a private property. I spoke to him and he referred to the owner, who lives in a house behind the chapel. She gladly allowed us to enter the building and take pictures inside. While she got the key, we played with her dog, who was enthusiastic about our occupation with him ... Siloam Methodist Chapel was built in 1833, rebuilt in 1866 and modified in 1878. The 1886 chapel was built in the Sub-Classical style of the gable-entry type. Siloam closed in 1993 and has since been converted for secular use. The current owner bought the church a few years ago and uses it today as a storage area. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  2. This church was the reason why I wanted to go to Wales during my last trip to the UK. Thanks @The_Raw and @Miss.Anthrope for visiting this place with me. History (taken from The_Raw) Engedi Welsh Calvinistic Methodist Chapel built was built in 1842, rebuilt in 1867 and modified in 1890. The present chapel, dated 1867, is built in the Classical style of the gable entry type, to the design of architect Richard Owen of Liverpool by Evan Jones of Dolyd and cost £4579. The Classical front is of granite masonry with Penmon stone dressings and a portico. The chapel is now Grade II listed. The interior contains an octagonal pulpit and an ornate organ with classical detailing including Corinthian pilasters and swags. The raked galley is on three sides and is supported by cast iron columns with brackets and foliate capitals. The ceiling consists of 15 square panels, again very heavily decorated with classical mouldings and with ornate roses to the centre of each providing ventilation and fittings for lights. The basement has a ministers room, offices and a schoolroom. The chapel was sold at auction in April 2014 for £45,000 after having been disused for a number of years. At this time it remains disused and in a state of disrepair. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
  3. Only a few quick shots, taken without a tripod. I don't know when the chapel (called "Capel Zinc") was built, it was a subsidiary tabernacle for the now Holy Trinity Church in Corris. Chairs has been removed and apparently the property is now used by a flower grower. Visited with @The_Raw and @Miss.Anthrope. 1 2 3 4
  4. Engedi Welsh Calvinistic Methodist Chapel built was built in 1842, rebuilt in 1867 and modified in 1890. The present chapel, dated 1867, is built in the Classical style of the gable entry type, to the design of architect Richard Owen of Liverpool by Evan Jones of Dolyd and cost £4579. The Classical front is of granite masonry with Penmon stone dressings and a portico. The chapel is now Grade II listed. The interior contains an octagonal pulpit and an ornate organ with classical detailing including Corinthian pilasters and swags. The raked galley is on three sides and is supported by cast iron columns with brackets and foliate capitals. The ceiling consists of 15 square panels, again very heavily decorated with classical mouldings and with ornate roses to the centre of each providing ventilation and fittings for lights. The basement has a ministers room, offices and a schoolroom. The chapel was sold at auction in April 2014 for £45,000 after having been disused for a number of years. At this time it remains disused and in a state of disrepair. One thing Wales has in abundance is abandoned chapels. They're not my kind of thing especially but as chapels go this is a pretty decent one. Andy K found this a couple of years ago and amazingly it hasn't changed a lot bar some extra pigeons and their wicked ways. Visited again with @Andy & @Miss.Anthrope. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Diolch am edrych eto
  5. Colonia IL / Mono Orphanage History The orphanage was built on the border of Switzerland and Italy. Sadly there doesn't seem to be a lot of information out there regarding this location. From what I've gathered it originally served as an orphanage and at some point in time, it was also used as a summer camp. Despite being closed during the 1970's, it has remained in pretty good condition with minimal graffiti and vandalism. Visit Visited again with @darbians and @vampiricsquid. Unfortunately when we visited the beds had been removed but lucky there was still a lot left to photograph. The chapel was absolutely stunning and it was nice to see that some furniture, including the desks from the classrooms were still there. All in all an excellent location to finish off our Italian adventure.
  6. This is my first Urbex adventure. I recently moved to West Sussex and though I'd have a look around at some popular and easily accessible sites to explore. I stumbled upon Bedham Chapel and after some quick research, I found the location and travelled there. We drove down a single track road until spotted it in the woodland below us. We parked a few hundred metres further down the road and set out on foot to get there. This is my video report that I captured and I apologise for the clickbaity title of the video and the fact that it's so weird it looks staged. But it really isn't! My girlfriends reaction to this is real and we were definitely creeped out by our find. If anyone has any idea of what this ceremony was about, please let me know! Video Link
  7. Been visiting this place for many years apart from the old Workhouse buildings which have almost disappeared, today we visited the chapel. Here are a few pics Added an update of the workhouse conditions too.
  8. A seminary in France that was later used as a medical centre and with a beautiful chapel! I think it closed within the past decade. Thanks for looking!
  9. The small chapel is idyllically situated on the hillside. Standing at the foot of the hill, the building is almost invisble. Thanks to the season, the knowing eye is able to spot the chapel between the sparse vegetation. Following up the slope for few minutes, a small weather-beaten wall appears. Climibing up the wall, there´s a small, overgrown path to follow. Inside the chapel it´s silent. Peaceful. The roof is full of holes - traces of the ravages of time. Ivy climbs steadily through the biggest of them. There´s still a large crucifix on the wall. The detailed depiction of Jesus is still in an unbelievable excellent condition. While Jesus looks as good as new, everything around him is decaying relentlessly. Unfortunately, I hardly have any information about the chapel. Old commemorative plaques testify that the chapel was probably errected by a local noble family. The building should be far more than 100 years old by now.
  10. Just a small chapel on the roadside. I don't know anything about the history. Visited with @The_Raw. 1 2 3 4 5 6
  11. This was the first stop on our weekend tour. It was a long arse drive from the tunnel to say the least! Cost a small fortune in tolls! A beautiful building inside! History: The construction of the chapel began mid 1800, This chapel is decorated in triforium (the openings of the galleries, above the aisles of a church, overlooking the nave), which is rare, for it is devoid of side aisles. Thanks for looking!
  12. A nice find by @SpiderMonkey while perusing the many chapels of Wales, this proved to be a surprisingly pleasing bonus for our Weekend... Capel Salem is an abandoned chapel in Pwllheli, North Wales. Built in 1862, the building was remodelled and enlarged in 1893 and is now Grade II listed. Along with the chapel, there are a couple of vestry rooms and a school room. The chapel was closed for around two years from 1913 and required extensive renovation following a fire. The fire was started by a local man who had tried to steal money from the chapel. He was unable to find any money so started the blaze instead.
  13. The first of a couple of chapels in Wales I visited with @SpiderMonkey last month... Engedi Chapel was established in 1842 and built as we see it today in 1867. The chapel's most impressive feature is its grand classical entrance, designed by architect Richard Owen of Liverpool. Its organ, pulpit and pews also remain intact.
  14. The Visit Managed to get into here a few week before it got burnt down and I am glad I did, was a enjoyable explore for a first outing even though it was trashed inside. History Loxley Chapel was built in 1787 by the Rev Benjamin Greaves who was the curate of Bradfield, along with a few friends. The chapel closed in 1993 after the parish had dwindled to an unsustainable amount. When the construction of the chapel had been completed, consecration was to be refused because the builders declined to put in an east window for unknown reasons. It was later sold at auction for approximately £315 and thus became an independent chapel. According to a religious census of 1851, an average congregation at an afternoon service was 200 and it had started performing baptisms in 1799. The first officer onboard the Titanic, Henry Tingle Wilde was reportidly christened here In its later life, the chapel became known as the Loxley United Reformed / Independent Church. It is a grade 2 listed building and has been on English Heritage at risk register since August 1985 Pics:
  15. One of my favourites during our trip through Italy. A beautiful chapel and when the sun shines you see the beautiful colors inside, it makes you speechless... #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9
  16. How to post a report using Flickr Flickr seems to change every time the wind changes direction so here's a quick guide on how to use it to post a report... Step 1 - Explore and take pictures Step 2 - Upload your chosen pictures to Flickr like this.. Step 3 - Once your images are successfully uploaded to flickr choose a category for the location that you have visited... Step 4 - Then "Start New Topic".. You will then see this screen... Step 5 - Now you are ready to add the image "links", known as "BBcodes", which allow your images to display correctly on forums.. Step 6 - Then click "select" followed by "view on photo page".. Now select "Share" shown below.. Step 7-13 - You will then see this screen... Just repeat those steps for each image until you're happy with your report and click "submit topic"! You can edit your report for 24 hours after posting to correct errors. If you notice a mistake outside of this window contact a moderator and they will happily rectify the problem for you
  17. The chapel, with ten-part rose windows, was intended simply as a funerary chapel, not a place of worship, and intended to be non-denominational. The floor plan is in the shape of a cross and the main entrance was covered for access by horse-drawn funeral carriages. Winding wooden staircases in the twin turrets gave access to the public gallery above. The octagonal steeple stands at 120 feet (36,5 meters) and was the tallest in the district when it was built in 1840. The architect was William Hosking, better known as a civil engineer; this (and the main cemetery entrance) remain the only surviving examples of his architectural work. The chapel is also the oldest surviving non-denominational funerary chapel in Europe. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
  18. The Blue Chapel forms part of a monastery in Italy. The area above the altar is painted blue and the high level windows flood the space with light and create an amazing blue glow behind a suspended figure of Jesus on a cross. The chapel is beautiful. It is a large space with ornate decorations, and all the seats are still in place. Alcoves at either side contain figures of people in glass boxes. The rest of the monastery is quite stripped and decaying. There are a large number of rooms in the building which would have mainly been used as living quarters. Visited with @SpiderMonkey, @PROJ3CTM4YH3M and Kriegaffe9
  19. The Explore A nice local one for this... nothing out of the ordinary on this explore really.. most of the building has been gutted but the dome alone made it worth the visit The History Sanofi's operations in the UK are aligned with the priorities of the NHS, and have for over 40 years been integral to our global success. Although the global headquarters are in Paris, in the UK they employ over 2,000 across the Group. With major products for diabetes, oncology, cardiovascular diseases, thrombosis and central nervous system disorders, providing effective healthcare solutions for patients all over the world. In August 2011, Bluemantle gained permission to transform the 30-acre former site of pharmaceutical firm Sanofi Aventis into a retail and leisure complex, which included the plans for the homes. The massive plans also include a convenience store, pub, restaurant, 40-bed hotel, offices, a medical facility, care home and childrens day centre. A housing developer has bought the land on the former Fisons site in Holmes Chapel in a £13 million deal. The deal for the 20-acre residential site on London Road, which will see the creation of 231 homes in the village. Bellway will build the homes on the site and has submitted a reserved matters application. Building work is due to start later this year, while Bluemantle has retained ownership of the remaining 10 acres.
  20. Recently I went further north than I ever have before, on an explore/fun times roadtrip to Scotland and the far north of England. Whilst it wasn't the most fruitful in terms of epic explores it was great to be out in some truly beautiful areas of the country seeing some new stuff. Garthland House Chapel was once part of a large estate turned nursing home, which now sits in a semi-demolished and perilous state. Luckily the chapel is still relatively intact and very pretty, but the rest of the place is really nothing more than a dangerous ruin with water pouring through it from the day's rain so we focused our efforts on the chapel itself. Thanks to Baron for the heads up on this one Thanks for looking
  21. Welcome to a place that has been a thorn in my side for the better part of a year and a half. Over repeated trips to Sheffield or up north I would stop by here, and every time I did, it would be sealed. Not so today, on my fourth attempt I finally got in. Whilst walking around the outside we heard voices from within and when entering discovered a group of about six girls and boys poking around the place, perfectly nice guys but my god they were noisy so any hint of subtlety was out the window. Sadly this place is quickly getting ruined by the local pondlife, so I'm glad I got to see it finally before it goes really downhill. Apart from nearly falling into the basement due to the hatch being open in a dark room it was fine, I do like a derelict church and after waiting so long to see this one it didn't disappoint. Thanks for looking more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/albums/72157659952221079
  22. This was our last spot on our day in Sheffield and for myself love places like this but wasnt that much in there History - Loxley Chapel was built in 1787 by the Rev Benjamin Greaves who was the curate of Bradfield, along with a few friends. The chapel closed in 1993 after the parish had dwindled to an unsustainable amount. When the construction of the chapel had been completed, consecration was to be refused because the builders declined to put in an east window for unknown reasons. It was later sold at auction for approximately £315 and thus became an independent chapel. According to a religious census of 1851, an average congregation at an afternoon service was 200 and it had started performing baptisms in 1799. The first officer onboard the Titanic, Henry Tingle Wilde was reportidly christened here Today the Graveyard and associated land is poorly maintained (it seems to be a theme in Sheffield graveyards).
  23. History Bethel Methodist Chapel was the third Calvinist chapel to be built in Newtown, the largest town in the county of Powys, Wales. It was originally constructed in 1810, and was later replaced in 1820. The present chapel was constructed on the site between 1875 and 1876. The Gothic style building, with its gable entry plan and flanking turrets, was designed by Richard Owens of Liverpool who was a distinguished architect at that time. The entire construction cost just over £2,300; most of this went towards the front elevation which is squared in masonry and sandstone dressings, the two buttresses to the main gable which at one time featured two individual spirelets, a large central wooden door and the slate roof tiles. The remainder of the building was constructed out of an inexpensive yellow brick. It is estimated that the former chapel once seated approximately 450 people. Although the former chapel was sold back in 2008/2009, it has since fallen into a bad state of repair. Initial plans expected to redevelop the site into residential accommodation or offices, but no such work was ever initiated. Internal water damage has caused a number of the wooden floorboards to disintegrate throughout the building, and a section of the upper balcony has collapsed under its own weight since a number of slates have fallen off the roof causing the roof above to decay rapidly. Our Version of Events With the Newport Transporter conquered, it was time to move on. However, owing to various people’s work commitments and other things, rather than heading further south we decided to head up through Wales instead. It had been a while since we’d all been there and there was plenty of cracking scenery to take in, so it seemed like a good idea. With plenty of driving to do before we reached the north east once again though, we decided to take a pit stop in the small town of Newtown because we’d heard that there was a pleasant little abandoned chapel there. As it turned out, there was indeed an abandoned chapel there. Access was pretty straightforward, which was a little disappointing after the challenge we had earlier the previous evening to get on the bridge, but we carried on and decided to take a look anyway. The chapel was smaller inside than it looks from the outside, and aside from the main navel there are only a couple of other empty rooms. The main body of the chapel itself still retains most of the classic features; namely its pews, the stained glass windows, an altar and the upper balcony, so they certainly made up for the disappointing overall size. We spent around twenty minutes there before we decided to crack on and make a move. Onwards and upwards was our main intention that day. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Meek-Kune-Do, The Hurricane, Box and Husky. 1: Bethel Chapel 2: Stained Glass up the Staircase 3: The Upper Balcony 4: Looking Down at Bethel Chapel's Navel 5: Trying to get the Roof in too 6: Intact Stained Glass 7: Heading Downstairs 8: The Backrooms 9: The Kitchen 10: Even More Stained Glass 11: Standing at the Altar 12: Rotten Floorboards 13: Rows of Pews 14: Front Entrance Window 15: The Old Wooden Door 16: Bethel Chapel External Shot
  24. Be rude not to have a look at this place, I was passing. The main entrance was blocked by RTC and police so a good old rough rear entry was in order. Bet this was stunning in its day. Loxley Chapel was built in 1787 by the Rev Benjamin Greaves who was the curate of Bradfield, along with a few friends. The chapel closed in 1993 after the parish had dwindled to an unsustainable amount. When the construction of the chapel had been completed, consecration was to be refused because the builders declined to put in an east window for unknown reasons. It was later sold at auction for approximately £315 and thus became an independent chapel. According to a religious census of 1851, an average congregation at an afternoon service was 200 and it had started performing baptisms in 1799. The first officer onboard the Titanic, Henry Tingle Wilde was reportidly christened here. The accompanying graveyard has also been abandoned, though wondering through you can clearly see well walked paths to some clean/not so forgotten loved ones graves. In its later life, the chapel became known as the Loxley United Reformed / Independent Church. It is a grade 2 listed building and has been on English Heritage at risk register since August 1985. Thanks for looking guys and gals
  25. More Italian goodness from our recent 'Tour di Bastardi' A lovely chapel with a blue hue, hence the name, tucked away in a ridiculously beautiful part of the world!! Attached to what I presume was maybe a seminary? Heres some pics... Thanks for lookin' in...
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