Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'city'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • General Discussion & Forum information
    • Forum information
    • Just take a moment & say Hi
    • General Discussion
  • Exploration Forums
    • Military Sites
    • Industrial Locations
    • Hospitals & Asylums
    • Public buildings, Education & Leisure
    • Underground Explores
    • High Places
    • Manors, Mansions & Residential
    • Religious Sites
    • Anything Else
  • Other Forums
    • Video Reports
    • Short Reports
    • Themed Threads

Categories

  • About the Forum
  • Urban Exploring information
  • Photography and camera advice
  • Technical Help

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website URL


Location


Interests

Found 19 results

  1. A stunning grade two listed gem decaying right on the high street. Featuring the stunning architecture of Alfred Waterhouse who also designed Strangeways prison the Manchester town hall. The main building has been used for many different purposes over the years as well as Prudential themselves. And the basement club was once a Berni inns restaurant (Cafe Monico) a chain that served a post-war British public such delight's as sherry schooners steak and chips and black forest gateau as well as becoming a dance club in the 90's. We had a wonderful two hours in this grade two listed time capsule. Hope you guys enjoy the pics as much as we enjoyed the explore. Thanks for any feedback The Urban Collective We Film It...
  2. following the decline of industries Sheffield offers plenty interns of urban exploring... from abandoned breweries, redundant steel works and leisure sites. It's difficult to experience all this in a single outing therefore I have compiled this into three years of exploring the city. Having started out at relatively low level explores and advancing this further to more harder to reach buildings here are some of the most important abandoned buildings Sheffield offers. If not for the buildings themselves Sheffield's street art is an important part of the explore. Often explorers take to photography for the art which is of a high standard coming from a far to experience this. Historically the buildings offer more than the art its self... the buildings often dating back to the victorian era give great scope to capture real history of the city. Often buildings have either been destroyed or are in the process of this. Been able to capture the buildings in their original state albeit a derelict one captures the cities past... and more importantly the history of British industry. END
  3. After a work conference, I decided a trip to the rather nice Belfast Mortuary was in order to help cure the immense hangover I had from drinking many pints and many whiskies the night before. Closed for a while, and slowly disintegrating from the local delinquents attention. Clear and Concise DSC06568 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Fridges DSC06599 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Fridge Close Up DSC06602 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Main Entrance DSC06606 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Scales DSC06566 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Stainless Slab DSC06584 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Another View DSC06586 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr# The other slab DSC06572 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr Drain DSC06578 by Dale Hamilton, on Flickr
  4. Hey All, I recently took a trip to the middle of the California desert to see an old abandoned movie set. While I was there I shot a video of the things that transpired. Be sure to check it out. A link with more information on the site is in the description of the video. I hope you enjoy, Anthony
  5. One more little surprise post from America! I was going to include this in my miscellaneous round-up thread but I liked the photos too much to shove in there amongst others. I first visited this place near as makes no difference a year ago to the day I visited it this time through a weird coincidence, and during that year it appeared that almost nothing has changed inside other than a litle bit more graffiti. I covered the site in greater detail last year so this time I broke out my 30mm Sigma prime lens for some arty goodness. This power plant was at one point part of a large carpet mill, and has been left abandoned for many years. In the early 2000s the chimney was demolished and the remains of the base can still be seen inside. The decay, the colours and the lighting in here are amazing, ridiculously photogenic. It is one of my favourite locations in the whole world to shoot in and I just wish it wasn't so far away. Thanks for looking, and this really is the end of my American posts...for now.
  6. Hi! A year ago I was in Czech republic and visited Milovice. Why do we know this town? At first, here parts of popular films "Hostel" and "Eurotour" were shot. And at second, what's more important, Milovice was a place where Soviet military base was situated. After the Second World War the place was used like a military tank base. They built a massive airport and accommodation for about 100,000 Soviet soldiers and their relatives. Soviet army was where till 1991. After 1996 the town is under reconstruction. But still... You can hear the echo of the war here. When you enter it, it's impossible to mix up soviet style of military architecture. It's empty in here. The Czechs are trying to demolish the reminiscence of the base but it's too hard, they need enough money... and you know they need to destroy their history. We were here without a map and didn't find the base and airport itself. But in the city center we found remains of a military village where Russian officers lived. Only in two steps from here there are mordern houses of Milovice. Sounds, laugh and life. And here is the abandoned hospital. Here was a monument to Antonin Sohkor, the commander of tommy-gunners' company in the Second World War, the Hero of the Soviet Union. Now it's demolished and forgotten. Here was the main square, you can still find hints at benches and street lamps. Like a small Pripyat. A gloomy ghost town full of history. I must say it's the most atmospheric place I've ever been.
  7. During a visit to London it would be rude not to hit up a few of the capital's rooftops! We visited a couple of them with great views. The first was a building site near Tower Bridge, offering great views of the bridge and along the Thames. It was a shame a crane was slightly obscuring the view from the tallest building, but it was still a great vantage point. A painful cloning job and the crane was gone! The second rooftop was on another building site where a 26 story skyscraper is being constructed. Set a small distance away from the city centre, the tower offers great views of the city skyline with some nice buildings in the foreground. I headed down south with Proj3ct M4yh3m and Spider Monkey, then met up with Peter, MrDan, and Dirty Jigsaw. Cheers guys Thanks for looking
  8. History In 1963, a man in the Nevşehir Province of Turkey knocked down a wall of his home. Behind it, he discovered a mysterious room. The man continued digging and soon discovered an intricate tunnel system with additional cave-like rooms. What he had discovered was the ancient Derinkuyu underground city, part of the Cappadocia region in central Anatolia, Turkey. The elaborate subterranean network included discrete entrances, ventilation shafts, wells, and connecting passageways. It was one of dozens of underground cities carved from the rock in Cappadocia thousands of years ago. Hidden for centuries, Derinkuyu‘s underground city is the deepest. Archaeologists believe the underground cities of Cappadocia could number in the hundreds. To date, just six have been excavated. The underground city at Derinkuyu is neither the largest nor oldest, but it fascinates as it is the deepest of the underground cities and was only recently discovered in 1963. (The largest, Kaymakli, has been inhabited continuously since first constructed). While there is no consensus for who is responsible for building Derinkuyu, many groups have occupied the underground city over the centuries. Derinkuyu is the deepest of the discovered underground cities with eight floors – reaching depths of 280 feet (85m) – currently open to the public. Excavation is incomplete but archaeologists estimate Derinkuyu could contain up to 18 subterranean levels. Miles of tunnels are blackened from centuries of burning torches. They were strategically carved narrow to force would-be invaders to crawl single-file. Eventually the tunnels reach hundreds of caves large enough to shelter tens of thousands of people. The build-out of Derinkuyu accommodated for churches, food stores, livestock stalls, wine cellars, and schools. Temporary graveyards were constructed to hold the dead; an ironic twist, bodies were stored underground until it was safe to return them the surface. Over one hundred unique entrances to Derinkuyu are hidden behind bushes, walls, and courtyards of surface dwellings. Access points were blocked by large circular stone doors, up to 5 feet (1.5m) in diameter and weighing up to 1,100 lbs (500 kilos). The stone doors protected the underground city from surface threats, and were installed so each level could be sealed individually. The tunneling architects included thousands of ventilation shafts varying in size up to 100 feet deep (30m). An underground river filled wells while a rudimentary irrigation system transported drinking water. Pics Thanks for looking
  9. As my stay in America rolled into October I headed out of Chicago and Eastwards on an overnight train towards Buffalo, intending on spending the day with a few contacts I had made before I flew across to the States and exploring what the upstate NY city had to offer. Well at least that was the plan. I always knew the train from Chicago to Buffalo was going to be a long one, I planned to do the trip between the two cities overnight arriving in Buffalo at around 8.30am. The train left Chicago nearly an hour late, and slowly rumbled it's way onwards. That should have set alarm bells ringing because, as the train was on a major freight route, the freight trains have priority. And because we left late, everything went out of sync. I tried to get some sleep, and eventually awoke at 6.30am. The chipper train announcer came over the tannoy and happily announced we were running four and a half hours late, as if it was perfectly normal. Which, to be honest, in America probably is. Eventually, I stumbled off the train in a soaking wet Buffalo six and a half hours after we were supposed to turn up - a train journey that was timetabled to take 10 hours had actually taken 16 and a half. I could have flown from Heathrow to New York and back again in the time it took for me to get from Chicago to Buffalo. Anyway, first port of call after I fell off the train was food, I devoured some pizza slices and soon we were on our way in the relentless rain - if you aren't familiar with 'lake effect' weather look it up because thats what we were exploring in! Basically it occurs when a large body of water acts like a weather machine independant of the wider climate which is capable of producing periods of localised torrential rain, hail or snow for minutes or hours at a time and that weekend Buffalo was right in the middle of a severe bout of it. After we re-organised our plans first port of call was perhaps Buffalo's most famous abandoned spot, the so-called 'Silo City'. Silo City is the name given to a number of enormous grain silos in one area of Buffalo, we tried to talk our way into the main Silos as one of my companions knew the security guard but he wasn't playing ball - later it turned out there was a paid photography workshop tour going on in there that day. So we went further down the river a little bit and made tracks for the two standing alone - the Cargills Pool Elevator and the absolutely enormous Concrete Central Elevator which is just under half a mile in length and one of the biggest single buildings I've ever seen - even bigger than Grand Moulins de Paris in Lille. Sadly due to some absolute morons getting stuck in the higher levels of the silos a few years ago all the stairs were cut off, so unless you fancied some major spiderman climbing there is no way of getting on top any more. Had it been dry and warm I may have attempted it but it was blowing a gale and pouring with rain so I decided against it. Here are some photos from both Cargills and Concrete Central, both follow roughly the same design but Concrete Central is unbelievably massive. More from Cargills here It's quite hard to get the scale of this place from photos. It's enormous. Last shot, the angry sky over Cargills... More from Central here Thanks for looking
  10. Ahhhhh that's more like it, back to the sneaky sneaky proper non permission visits Late September brought around what was planned as an absolutely mental weekend of explores, which turned out to be a lot easier said than done as neither me nor my American contact factored in the 'awake for 60 hours' part...First stop was a meet-up in a small city in upstate New York, which was once the American home of Carpet weaving/manufacturing. Same old story, once all the mills shut down and the jobs moved abroad, all the money dried up and the city has never recovered. Most of the downtown area is full of empty shops and many many homes are vacant. As it turned out, when we arrived neither of us knew about the epic steep hill that needed to be climbed to get into the actual city as the Amtrak station was right at the bottom of the hill! And in 25+ degrees heat, carrying my life in a large purple bag on my back and my smaller rucksack with cameras etc, and a tripod, it became a real endurance test for me over the three days we travelled around. As is always the case we chose the most ridiculously difficult way into the place and found a hilariously easy way out the other side, but ever since I found this place and put it on my map I had wanted to see it, it's always good doing a power plant but to do one not even the majority of American explorers know about is even better - especially when it comes complete with a pair of late 19th-century turbines. The main mill building is long gone and the smoke stack was brought down in 2006 but the long-vacant power plant remains sat there slowly rusting away, encased by undergrowth. Thanks for looking, more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157648659792079/
  11. Beneath a large town in Belgium there is an underground graveyard. Back in the 1800's they realised there wasnt place left to bury the dead, so they went underground. Its been closed for many years now, because of the possibility of collapsing. They are started to renovate it by now, but there wont be any people left who actually knows any of the burried people. Excuse me for my bad grammar 1: 2: 3: 4: 5:
  12. So this had been on my radar for a while, I even visited here in January 2005 with my parents and some friends to buy some Chinese ingredients for a special meal that was being cooked for an occasion of which I can't remember. At 14 years old this place was really interesting, lots of interesting food and foreign ingredients. I remember getting a plate and having a little bit of everything from about 4 stalls, the food stalls were round in a square shape and the communal seating in the middle. They had all sorts, Chinese, Japanese, Malaysian, Singaporean, Korean etc. I remember seeing it reported on way back in 2011, but put it off due to rumours of heavy handed security. Me and Northern_Ninja visited early this year and couldn't even get into the site. We returned for another go and saw a small gap. It was a good day out and sort of cheered me up slightly following a personal grievance. The complex served a large Community in North London and people would travel a long way to browse its two stories of restaurants, bars, clubs, shops and supermarkets. It was originally a Yaohan Shopping Centre; but changed its name when the Yahoan Corp went bust in the 90s. There was a durian stall, a satay stall, a Karaoke bar called the "China City Karaoke Bar", Dim Sum restaurants and a Szechuan restaurant to name a few. The centre also included tableware and clothes shops. It had featured on the TV series "Luther" and on the movie Dredd, where the interior was modified to look more trashed sadly. It has also fallen victim to vandals. Onto the pics. Unfortunately I forgot the externals! Thanks as always More at: Oriental/China City - a set on Flickr
  13. Peterborough District Hospital Closed in closed in 2010 when the new city hospital took over. In some places there is already a high level of decay. It didn't have as many interesting features we were hoping for. Highlights include the autoclaves in the basement. Large water tank on the top floor. The huge pile of keys. The swimming pool and the gym. We wanted to check out the morgue but there was building work happening right outside.
  14. I visited this place last year when I was trying to see as many asylums as possible before they were knocked down or converted. I must have got to this one just in time, as last time I visited there were people living in it. It was nice to see the building being put to good use and the development company did a lovely job of the conversion with minimal demolition. History: Stone House Hospital, formerly the City of London Lunatic Asylum, was a hospital and former mental illness treatment facility in Stone, near Dartford, Kent, in the United Kingdom. As of November 2007, the hospital has been closed, and its has been redeveloped into luxury flats. Stone House was originally constructed between 1862 and 1866 at the behest of the London Commissioners in Lunacy to provide for pauper lunatics from the London area at a cost of £65,000. The buildings were designed in a Tudor Revival architecture style by James Bunstone Bunning, and the facility accommodated 220 patients. The asylum grounds, at first 33 acres (130,000 m2) and later expanded to 140 acres (0.57 km2), included a working farm. Additions to the original buildings were made in 1874, 1878, and 1885, including an expanded female wing and a separate hospital building for patients with infectious diseases. After 1892, the asylum was able to take "private" patients (patients whose fees were paid by their families, or from pensions). The influx of private patients resulted in a budget surplus, and enabled expansion and improvements of the asylum's facilities. In 1924 the facility was renamed the City of London Mental Hospital, and in 1948 it was taken over by the new National Health Service and became known as Stone House Hospital. A 1998 assessment by Thames Healthcare suggested that the hospital was not suited for modern healthcare; plans for the hospital's closure were initiated in 2003 by West Kent NHS.
  15. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.
  16. Oriental City was a shopping centre in Colindale, London specialising in various oriental foods and items. It is located on Edgware Road The centre contained a large oriental supermarket, and a food court with a range of foods from different areas of South-East Asia; stalls offered Malaysian, Thai, Vietnamese, Chinese, Korean and Japanese. The food court was immensely popular with surrounding office workers and the North London community; and often became very crowded at weekends Aside from the food outlets, the centre also previously housed an import game shop, a Sanrio store, and one of the largest oriental bookshops in Europe, called Asahiya Shoten. In the period shortly before the centre closed down, shoppers could find a tailor's shop, a jeweller, a hairdresser, a beauty shop, Chinese medicine shops, a martial arts store, and a large furniture store. Oriental City was also host to a Sega Dome arcade Planning application was submitted on the 8th June 2010 to demolish the shopping centre, here are some snippets from the proposal... 1. Redevelopment for mixed-use purposes,with a replacement Oriental City to include a Sui Generis amusement arcade and separately a new B & Q and bulky goods store and a health & fitness studio which together should provide 500 jobs 2. 520 residential units (comprising 1-, 2- and 3-bedroom flats, 4% being affordable) located in eight blocks rising to 3, 6, 9 and 18 storeys 3. A nursery and primary school for 480 children 4. 1,098 car-parking spaces The Oriental City in its hey day Right, on with the photos..... The menu at The Hunan Restaurant. I'll have the number 24 with a number 53 on the side, Fried Frog with Pig Ear in Special Sauce!!! Nom Nom!!! Visited with, wait for it... Skeleton Key, Priority 7, Trog, Wevsky, Silver Rainbow, Space Invader, Obscurity and a non member called Ben. Yup 9 of us mooching around the shopping centre, it was like it was open again
  17. Good little explore this one, all was going well till secca appeared with dogs and got us escorted off site by police Visited with Nelly, Skeleton Key, Msaunder1972, Non Member Ben, Troglodyte, Priority Seven, Wevsky, SpaceInvader and Obscurity. Nelly has more than covered the History on this one so straight on with the Pics Thanks to Nelly and the guys for pointing this one out
  18. Apologies to the guys due to me and explore beer Right troglodyte pointed this one out and after a security fail at st Josephs we headed here!was a very pleasant explore till the man the alsatian and the baseball bat came into play,we pointed out we where leaving at this point he said no you are not !Could Not re iterate further the point ..look mate we are going..9 of us on this explore which tbh was a tad crazy but we had no intention of antagonising said man and dog but he wouldnt leave us alone in the end as we where talking to the police out side he chased a few of the guys out to fence still waving baseball bat..so names taken etc and we where allowed to go..a few pics from this part of the day Bowling alley win Troglodyte Just a few pics from a very eventfull day..visited with space invader obscurity silver rainbow nelly ,troglodyte and way to many people
  19. After driving for 2 hours and arriving at our location, we found a long line of workers waiting for the site to open so the can begin there work for the day. Cop cars where parked all over the place and the police where standing on the road like they where doing crowd control for a angry mob. So we deicied to take a few pictures from the parking lot. Then we started to move closer and see if anyone was paying attention to us and they where not. So down the train tracks we went. The first place I was told to enter at had a truck parked right by it and workers all over the place. So we moved on to the second entrance, where once again we came across people working. We had to settle for exterior shots only. I will be go back one day and get what I went for. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.
×