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  1. Day two of @Mookster and my first Northern Explore of the year; and in true Mookster style; we get up from our cosy beds and leave the sleepy world of The Premier Inn before breakfast is even a thing in these hotels; a point that hurts me to the core as the Designated Driver, but clearly pays off once the wall of fatigue is overcome. We leave the hotel and take a drive to Bee Hive; this weekend has been a little hit and miss so far; so we have high hopes of this as it had been the Tour Bus stop off of the month; and after parking up and spending much time trying to get inside having been spotted by the sleepy street waking up numerous times; we set about a great explore. This site is very stripped out inside; but the lighting is just divine; the paintwork, features and the things that are left behind are just lovely. We both REALLY enjoyed this one; despite the bareness, it had a really nice feeling about it. - The first of the two mills on this site, was built in 1895, with the second larger mill following soon after, in 1902. The complex was constructed in a rather lovely Italianate style, with staircases disguised as campaniles along with terraced roofing and balustrades and including a very picturesque lodge/office building at the front gate. The mill span cotton up until 1967 when that venture closed. Ever since then; Bee Hive has had various other industrial uses, seemingly most recently it was occupied by a bed/furniture warehouse until they vacated some time ago. The place eventually closed down entirely in 2016 and plans to demolish this beautiful building, despite its protected status have been heavily criticized by the locals; and rightly so. Would be a tragedy. #1 [ #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21 #22 #23 #24 As always Guys, thank you for taking the time to look, More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157703821237512
  2. Early morning Sunday mooch around a choice bit of Birmingham industry? Yeah... Don't mind if I do!! And seeing as its a local job, I'll be back soon as I didn't have time to cover it all... With a WEALTH of machinery and gubbins left behind, I could have quite happily wasted most of the day here... ...The West Bromwich Spring Company... Thanks for lookin' in...
  3. History taken from Amlwch History- In early 1920 an American Engineer called Thomas Midgley discovered that a chemical called Tetraethyl lead (TEL) was an excellent material for preventing “knock†in engines. It was also discovered that a chemical made from bromine called dibromoethane (DBE) was very effective in preventing the build up of lead inside engines. A number of chemical plants were constructed in the United States to make and blend TEL & DBE together into a material which was marketed as “antiknock compound†The effect of this compound when added to petrol was to dramatically increase the power obtainable from engines and hence miles per gallon. In the late 1930s the UK government feared a war and realising how important antiknock compound would be in the production of high quality fuels for military aircraft ,decided that production facilities should be set up in the UK as a matter of urgency. In 1938 a plant to produce TEL was built at Northwich in Cheshire. A DBE plant was built at Hayle in Cornwall. The plants were commissioned in 1940 just before the Battle of Britain. The use of anti knock compound in our aircraft used in the battle allowed our planes to fly faster and climb higher than the enemy’s aircraft. In 1953 a bromine and DBE production site was built at Amlwch. It was important that the seawater from which the bromine is extracted is as clean as possible, could be replenished with fresh seawater quickly and was warmed by the Gulf Stream. Three factors which influenced the decision to built the new plant at Amlwch. Quite an interesting read and great little place to explore, sadly some of the more interesting buildings have been demolished, still quite a bit to see! Another visit is on the cards as i ran out of time and views from the water tower are a must! Nice to see the staff had a great camaraderie. Rip Tony. Theres also this sexy beast nearby Cant wait to go back!
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