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Found 13 results

  1. As part of another backlog of our West Country Trip, @Mookster, our American Explorer Friend @cgrizzy and myself traveled to this rather derpy site. It's one of the list but little of interest remains inside; though its quite large, with long concrete voids with some pretty good Graffiti in places. Not much was going on inside; except some kids with a makeshift skate park in the middle who seemed slightly suprised to spot us. There is some really cool shots of nature reclaiming in here; lots growing everywhere and areas have collapsed. The Dries in Wenford were built in the early part of the 20th century (likely post-1907) to serve the local china clay pit at Stannon on Bodmin Moor. China Clay in liquid form was carried in a pipeline from the pit to the settling tanks behind the dries. The dries operated until the final closure in 2002 (aside from a brief closure during WWII). The works were originally built by the Stannon China Clay Company, but were acquired by English China Clays in 1919. The choice of site was heavily influenced by the presence of an existing railway line leading from Wenford Bridge which was originally constructed to carry granite from the nearby De Lank quarries. The dry was built adjacent to the railway line and a large private siding was built to connect to the network. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157701301733375
  2. previously known as Frontier City, a former American Wild West theme park in Cornwall. Closed in 2009
  3. When I'm in Wales I'm free for the whole weekend so I'll just drive around the back roads and mountain roads, looking for old tracks to venture up or places to visit in the future...But I'm not going to have this much free time in Cornwall, it's mainly a holiday...but come 11pm when everyone's asleep my plan is to go exploring. Any pointers or possible locations to explore, not too far from St Ives, an hour-ish maybe, would be appreciated. I'm not going until next weekend, 20th, but I'm not sure of the next time I'll be making the 5+ hour journey from where I live in Northampton, so I want to make the most of the holiday. I've only just booked it so I have just under 2 weeks to scour Google maps and try to find some sites, but any help would be great. Cheers
  4. Hi guys, long time explorer but not registered on any forums before. Im based in Cornwall but get about a bit (oo-er). look forward to having a look around the site and potentially meeting a few of you.
  5. St. Lawrence's Asylum (Cornwall County Asylum), Bodmin, Cornwall Seffy and END-PROC. Some history for you, seeing as this place has only recently cropped back up: After this place had been described to me a while ago, I did some searching online, and instantly wanted it. To be honest, the hall alone seemed a good enough reason to pay it a visit. Like others though, I'd been put off by tales of PIRs, high tech CCTV systems and security patrols left, right and centre. Seeing as it's a good two and a half hours drive from me, the idea of going all that way and failing was not appealing in the slightest. This meant I needed to wait until I had confirmation that it could be done, before making the trip. This conformation came in the form of two reports only a week or two ago. As soon as I saw them, I knew that now was the time! A big thanks to djflava, who, after not being able to make it himself, kindly gave us the heads up we needed to get in. This being said, access was not as easy as first anticipated, and a lot of trial and error was involved, but the result was worth it in the end. Time was not on our side, which meant that we didn't have time to see it all. I mean, what a shame, that might mean I just have to take another trip back... Cheers.
  6. I wasn't sure weather to post this one as some of the photos are not great. This was my first ever explore and only had a point and shoot at the time and no tripod. It's very stripped inside the hospital but the main hall is fantastic and probably one of the best in the UK, this is down to the very effective security and P.I.R sensors scattered around the site, we managed 4 hours in here before we were welcomed by 2 secca and 6 coppers some of which were armed. A couple of years later I returned and found access to the service tunnels but every access point into the hospital from the tunnels were sealed off.
  7. The granite quarry at St Breward's primary function was to supply the building blocks for the re build of Bodmin's notorious Gaol back in the mid 1800's. But granite blocks from this St Breward source have built great bridges and cobbled our roads far and wide, giving rise to some of the most prominent architectural structures in the land. The great Naval College at Dartmouth owes its character to St Breward stone and in Britain's capital, so does, London's County Hall, Transport House, the Esso Tower, the Shipping Office and most of the buildings in Paternoster Row. All owe their existence to St Breward stone, cut from here, dressed and shipped by transport provided by the rail head at Wenford Bridge. Now ironically, the start of the Camel trail, one of the most popular and picturesque nature trails used by cyclists and walkers in the country. Other perhaps more impressive architectural structures are St Breward born too and are laid claim to by the Hantergantick Quarry and St Brewards oldest and perhaps most famous commercial granite quarry, the De Lank quarry, the most famous granite quarry in Cornwall at the turn of the century. The fist quarry here, known as the Eddystone is now unused but forms a part of the whole quarry complex. It was used for the construction of the lighthouse of the same name back in 1750's
  8. Paid a visit to Predannack Airfield in Cornwall which is an amazing place and well worth the trip if you are down this way with plenty to see History Admiralty surveyors first started preliminary surveys of land near Helston in 1942. RNAS Culdrose was commissioned as HMS Seahawk five years after these initial surveys. The station was originally designed to be a wartime airfield lasting about ten years. The initial plans were for Culdrose to serve as a Naval Fighting School, it soon developed other roles. These varied roles included such things as the trials of the Navy's first jets, training of Airbone Early Warning crews and as a home base for carrier based aircraft. Over the years the stations emphasis changed from fixed wing aircraft to rotary wing, although its main role remains largely the same. On with the shots ..... , ,
  9. Sadly long gone this was a good mooch for a local site Croggons tannery ran from 1712 to 2002. Tanning took a long time. After washing, hides were placed in lime solution for two to three weeks to remove hair. Hides were then laid flat in vats with oak bark (or ground Turkish acorns after 1889) between the layers and soaked in tannin for 18 months to two years. Argentinian and Dutch hides were tanned with local hides and shipped out of Charlestown. In the early 20th century the number of Cornish tanneries declined from over 18 to two and from 1952 Croggons was the only Cornish tannery. Apart from the tannery Grampound is best known as Cornwall's most corrupt parliamentary borough. Several Croggons elected MPs there up to 1820. , ,
  10. The Cornish Alps began to dominate the landscape as every ton of usable china clay that was mined brought with it five tonnes of waste. Railways and tramways were built to transport the material to the coast. By 1910, Cornwall was producing some fifty per cent of the world's china clay, something in the region of one million tonnes every year, seventy-five percent of which was exported. In 1919 the three main producers merged, calling themselves English China Clay, which continued to dominate the market until it was bought by French company, Imerys, in 1999, for £756m. Any visitor to St Austell is likely to be struck by the impressive sharp peaks, known as the Cornish Alps, which dominate the surrounding landscape and represent the most visible part of a story that goes back two hundred and fifty years, the story of china clay. China clay, as the name suggests, is a material known as kaolin, which was first used in China more than ten thousand years ago to make fine white porcelain. Some of this eventually made it's way to Europe, where the gentry still had to make do with crude earthenware pots, and porcelain was highly sought-after. Noticing a gap in the market, a Plymouth apothecary called William Cookworthy began to research the porcelain-making process and spent several years searching for a material that resembled the kaolin that had been used for so long in China. In 1745 he eventually found it, at Tregonning Hill, near Germoe, in Cornwall, where a rare type of decomposed granite, finer than most talcum powders, arises naturally. This material was known locally as Moorstone, Growan and Growan Clay. Cookworthy found a way to seperate the material, using water to remove impurities, and then spent another twenty years developing his own recipe for making porcelain, which he succesfully patented in 1768. Cookworthy immediately established the Plymouth Porcelain Factory, and began making fine china to sell to the gentry. He also began to sell the raw material to other English potteries. By the early nineteenth century the industry was big business. The St Austell deposits had emerged as the largest in the world, and many other uses had been found for the clay, such as in paper, paint and rubber goods. Throughout the 19th century thousands of men were employed, with harsh working conditions, either spraying the walls of open pits with high-pressure hoses to remove the clay, or processing and transporting the material, which was exported to all corners of the globe. By the mid 19th century 65,000 tonnes of china clay were being mined in the St Austell area every year by seven thousand workers. Formerly tiny villages were quickly developed to cater for the industry. West Polmear, for example, which had a pre-china-clay population of nine, was thoroughly transformed by local landowner and entrepeneur Charles Rashleigh, who invested huge sums of money building a safe harbour for ships, and houses and factories for workers. Charlestown, as it became known, soon boasted a population of three thousand, a small dock packed with ships, and harbour sheds and warehouses bustling with boatbuilders, rope menders, brick workers, lime burners and pilchard curers. Today, the St Austell deposits, which have produced around 120 million tonnes of china clay and are good for at least aonther fifty years, have largely been abandoned. Imerys moved most of their operations to Brazil in the early part of this century and there are now fewer than two thousand employees left in Cornwall. The legacy of China Clay still defines the region, however, with even the iconic Eden Project owing it's existence to the industry, sitting, as it does, in a former china clay pit. The China Clay Country Park, which consists of twenty-six acres of woodland located in the Ruddle valley, near St Austell, is home to the Wheal Martyn Heritage Museum, set in the grounds of two former working china clay pits. The museum is open every day throughout the summer and a series of clay trails have been developed by volunteers, providing access to this fascinating landscape for cyclists, walkers and horse riders.
  11. Histroy A commercial port in Cornwall has cease trading and axe nearly 200 jobs as part of cuts carried out by a china clay company. The cuts at Par Docks are part of plans announced earlier in the week by Imerys to make 800 workers redundant. The docks will stop being used for ships exporting clay, and two-thirds of the site's clay dryers will close. Imerys said it regretted the cuts, but said they were necessary to protect the future of its business. Massive blow The company blamed high energy prices, a weak dollar and strong overseas competition for significant business losses. The move is a massive blow for the area, which was originally built to provide housing for clay workers at the docks. China clay is piped to the harbour near St Austell in slurry form and then dried at the docks' dryers before being exported by boat, road or rail. The dryers for paper-coating clay will close by the end of 2007, but the dryers for performance minerals and ceramics clay will be unaffected. County and borough councillor, Joan Vincent, said the closure would badly affect the area, especially after a large amount had recently been spent there to help the china clay industry. She said: "The county council has spent a vast amount of money to alter Skew Bridge to get lorries under there." She said that money had now been wasted.
  12. Cligga Wolfram & Tin Mine lies on the cliff tops about one and a quarter miles southwest of Perranporth on the North Cornish coast. The granite pegmatite cliffs have been altered to greisen and exhibit jointing and veining. The veins often filled with cassiterite (tin oxide), wolframite, mispickel (arsenical pyrite) and the copper/iron suphides, chalcopyrite and bornite. Silver ore has also been reported here. There is one shaft on the sett called Contact Shaft and two adits, one at beach level called Beach Adit, the other atop the cliffs and unsurprisingly called Cliff Adit. The mine worked in the early part of the twentieth century although 'Old Men's Workings' from the past are quite visible as you approach the area. Mining restarted in 1938 after a period of closure prior to the mine being taken over by the 'Rhodesian Mines Trust Limited in 1939'. Trials were carried out around this time to see if it was more feasible to work the stockwork as an open cast pit rather than an underground mine, but this came to nothing. There is surprisingly little information on Cligga although there are production records showing that between 1940 and 1944, 300 tons of wolfram and 200 tons of black tin were raised and sold. ,
  13. I had the opportunity for a mid week explore, so would of been rude not to.. This is nothing special just a drainage tunnel for the quarry, which is around a mile long from start to finish and ends up in the bottom of the pit The Delabole slate quarry is one of the largest of its type in England and has run continuously since the 15th century making it the oldest working slate quarry in England. In the reign of Elizabeth I the five quarries on the site of the now larger pit assumed considerable importance delivering slate to Brittany and the Netherlands. In 1841 the five quarries combined to make the Old Delabole Slate Quarry. The Old Delabole Slate Quarry Ltd was liquidated in 1977 by the company's bankers. It was run under receivership by Rio Tinto Zinc until 1999 when a local management team bought it out. The quarry is now owned by a local family. In 1910, 500 people were employed at the quarry but this has since reduced to 80, the decline due to the availability of cheaper roofing materials e.g. Welsh slate or prefabricated tiles. Delabole Quarry was once the deepest man-made pit in the world, but this is no longer the case due to massive open cast mines and quarries in America and Australia. The quarry was connected to a narrow gauge railway worked by steam and diesel locomotives to assist in moving the slate: this is thought to have begun before 1834 and continued in use until after 1987. The North Cornwall Railway provided a freight service from Delabole between 1893 and 1964 (passenger services ended in 1966.
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