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  1. In these buildings was produced from 1900 to 2009. However, the origin of production goes back to the 14th century.
  2. We came across this looking for some underground stuff and was a nice little find. Since we went I have seen in the news that parts of it have been set on fire and unsafe. History.. In 1819, Rylands & Sons were established with their seat of operations being in Wigan. John, the youngest partner, occupied himself with travelling over several counties for orders until 1823, when he opened a warehouse for the firm in Manchester. Business increased rapidly, and in the course of a few years extensive properties at Wigan, along with dye works and bleach works, were purchased. Valuable seams of coal were afterwards discovered under these properties, and proved a great source of wealth to the purchasers. From 1847, John Rylands became sole proprietor of the company owing to the death of his father and retirement of his brothers around 1839. Designed by George Woodhouse in 1866, Rylands Mill was built and had served the local population for work until the overall demise of the textile industry had taken it's toll across the country. In 1985 it became an annexe to Wigan Technical College and became better known as the Pagefield Building until closure in 2007. The facade along the front was repointed and boasts some wonderful brick pattern work, this mill being the most expensive around at the time it was built. Owners Tower Gate recieved planning consent from the Planning committee for residential and office use but have yet to start any work onsite. There is a three year expiry date in which works must start or another plannning application must be lodged.
  3. Hi guys, A nice little woollen mill . Was a good explore but very small. untouched for years. 'Some history I found that it was built in 1847 by the Morris family and produced flannel and cloth which was sent to markets across Wales and Great Britain. The mill was also a significant local employer and later became the first supplier of power to the local village, which was the first in in the county to have electricity. The parish council paid £10.00 per annum for street lighting and houses were charged 5 shillings for one 60W lamp which then cost a further seven shillings and sixpence for 3 months electricity supply. Mr Morris turned off the power at 10.30pm each night believing that that was quite late enough for anyone to be awake. During the Second World War demand for flannel products fell and despite diversification into new products and the opening of a shop on the first floor, the mill went into decline, finally closing in 1962. Unfortunately, attempts to donate the property to the National Trust for preservation were unsuccessful as the owner was unable to provide a share of the funding and the mill was abandoned Today it looks like very little has changed since the day the last shift finished and the machines fell silent almost sixty years ago. Protected by obscurity and relative isolation, it has become fossilised, frozen in time: bobbins are still wound with wool and the last cloth woven is still lying on the shuttle loom. Baskets of unspun wool stand waiting on the upper floor and books and papers lie scattered about, all covered in a thick layer of dust, deadening sound: a world away from the deafening clatter of a working mill. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 Thanks for looking.
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