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Found 31 results

  1. I visited this site on two separate occasions; once in early April with a non-explorer friend; and again a week later with Mookster and our American Explorer friend who is over on a uni placement. The site is in the middle of a busy town, right on the main road and is in pretty good condition; not surprising as it only closed in December 2017. Inside its very very bare and only a few features redeem it. It's nice and relaxed and all the power is still on, meaning that the cell panic alarms work and can be silenced from the central panel. Brentwood is one of several Police Stations in Essex to close recently; Tim and I explored Witham Station on the first visit. The Police Station was built in 1937 and In December 2015 it was announced by Police and Crime Commissioner Nick Alston, that 15 police stations were to be closed to the public in Essex as part of a £63million spending cut. Brentwood Police Station was one of the 9 Police Stations closing completely. He stated that the buildings were buildings were no longer fit for purpose. "Police officers, not buildings, fight crime," Chief Constable Stephen Kavanagh said. "We spend too much on too many police buildings, many of which are either no longer fit for policing or are hardly used by the public to report crime. Bentwood Police station was eventually closed to the public in April 2016, and was finally fully vacated by the Police in December 2017. Police Operations have now moved to the local Town Hall. The building was closed as it cost £10million per year in running costs, and would have cost a further £30million in maintenance to bring it to modern standards. Kemsley LLP have recently announced the earmarking of Brentwood Police Station for proposed residential development. The former Police Station extends to approximately 2.75 acres and a planning application is to be submitted for 70-100 dwellings as part new builds,and part conversion of existing buildings. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #18 #19 #20 #21 #22 #23 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157696171022175
  2. Sheffield Old Town Hall stands on Waingate in central Sheffield, England, opposite Castle Market. The building was commissioned to replace Sheffield's first town hall, which had opened in 1700 to a design by William Renny. This first structure stood by the parish church, on a site with little prospect for extension. The Old Town Hall was built in 1807-8 by Charles Watson, and was designed to house not only the Town Trustees but also the Petty and Quarter Sessions. The initial building was a five-bay structure fronting Castle Street, but it was extended in 1833 and again in 1866, the most prominent feature was the new central clock tower over a new main entrance that reoriented the building to Waingate. At the same time, the building's courtrooms were linked by underground passages to the neighbouring Sheffield Police Offices. By the 1890s, the building had again become too small, and the current Sheffield Town Hall was built further south. The Old Town Hall was again extended in 1896-7 and became Sheffield Crown Court and Sheffield High Court. In the 1990s, these courts moved to new premises, and since at least 1997 to present, the building remains disused.
  3. Designed by Architect to the Metropolitan Police, John Dixon Butler FRIBA, the Greenwich Magistrates’ Court opened in 1909 with an integral police station. The Symmetrical frontage is faced in Portland Stone in a free Classical style and features a central semi-circular tablet with Royal Coat of Arms, carved in stone by Lawrence Turner. Inside, the entranceway leads to the former police station foyer which has a mosaic tiled floor with MP monogram (for Metropolitan Police) laid by Messrs Diespeker. The foyer leads onto Court 1, the main courtroom which is toplit with a decorative plaster frieze around the light well and a monogram of Edward VII in plaster above the bench. The Courtroom has mostly original fittings and the bench is in a curved recess, up three steps. The court has its own custody suite. The suite consists of nine prison cells with associated facilities for booking in prisoners etc. Visited here with @AndyK! a few months back. We sat on this for a while as we were hoping to return and see if we missed any bits but haven't got around to it. Anyway, I think we saw all the best bits. Here are some of my photos to begin with, and a few taken by Andy at the end. I also poached the history from his website report, so cheers for that! A few shots of the custody suite from Andy Thanks for looking
  4. This was the first stop when we spent the day around Sheffield, 5 tried 5 entered. History - Sheffield Old Town Hall stands on Waingate in central Sheffield, England, opposite Castle Market. The building was commissioned to replace Sheffield's first town hall, which had opened in 1700 to a design by William Renny. This first structure stood by the parish church, on a site with little prospect for extension. The Old Town Hall was built in 1807–8 by Charles Watson, and was designed to house not only the Town Trustees but also the Petty and Quarter Sessions. The initial building was a five-bay structure fronting Castle Street, but it was extended in 1833 and again in 1866 by William Flockton (1804–1864) of Sheffield and his partner for the project, Abbott; the most prominent feature was the new central clock tower over a new main entrance that reoriented the building to Waingate. At the same time, the building's courtrooms were linked by underground passages to the neighbouring Sheffield Police Offices. Waingate in 1857: the Old Town Hall with its first clock tower on the left The first Town Council was elected in 1843 and took over the lease of the Town Trustees' hall in 1866. The following year, the building was extensively renovated, with a clock tower designed by Flockton & Abbott being added. By the 1890s, the building had again become too small, and the current Sheffield Town Hall was built further south. The Old Town Hall was again extended in 1896–97, by the renamed Flockton, Gibbs & Flockton, and became Sheffield Crown Court and Sheffield High Court. In the 1990s, these courts moved to new premises, and since at least 1997 to present, the building remains disused. In 2007, it was named by the Victorian Society as one of their top ten buildings most at-risk.
  5. Massive thanks to The_Raw and ExtremeIroning for showing us this one!! Well worth the 4 hour drive from T'old Yorkshire to the big city! Explored with Raz, Jamie, Damo and Michael the night before the Kent Meet up. From what I can gather Angel Court is a 70's design high rise office block which has recently been pulled down to replace the old style concrete floors with the new alloy light weight stuff. Its situated in the middle of a construction site in the heart of the financial district (I think...) So After a 4 hour drive from Yorkshire straight from work we met Damo and Michael and first of all we tried a block of flats only to be confronted by a rather rude and aggressive resident. So down we made a quick exit and i spent the next 20 mins trying to navigate the chaos of London city centre roads for the first time. Found somewhere to park and then managed to get pretty lost and walk around 3 miles more than we should have done (Burned off my MacDonalds so thanks for that guys ) we arrived at Angel Court. At first i was convinced that 5 of us were not going to sneak into this site but alas we did, starting with Michael scaling the fence and making it a little easier for the rest. Far too many steps in here Only spent half hour or so at the top as we were pushed for time but heres what i got; Thanks for looking
  6. Tower Bridge Magistrates Court is a Grade II listed building dating back to 1906. The three storey building was designed by John Dixon Butler with a stone and brickwork exterior and an Edwardian Baroque style roof. The Court entrance is flanked by high socles supporting giant Ionic columns to the 1st and 2nd floors with the Royal coat of Arms above. There are 3 courtrooms, two are formal dark wood panelled traditional courtrooms and one is a late 1970's relatively modern courtroom. The court closed it's doors in June of last year and there are now plans for it to be turned into a hotel. I've had my eye on this for a good while, it has 24hr security inside the building and various people turn up to to work in the offices upstairs. With no obvious ways inside and with so much activity I was thinking of trying for a permission visit but just hadn't got around to it. Then something amazing happened when myself and Gabe walked past at 6am after a night of rooftopping and drinking. We rang the doorbell, security came to the door, barely even looked at us and just waved us straight in as though he was expecting us. We waltzed straight past him like we were meant to be there and disappeared through the first door we could see. We managed an hour sneaking around inside before a different security guy found us and asked us who we were. We gave him a load of cock and bull about how we were doing a photography project and our lecturer had arranged our visit. After checking his records he said we would have to come back another time when permission had been established, apparently the guy who opened the door for us was on his first shift and had assumed we were meant to be there. It was a hilarious adventure from start to finish, the only gutter was we didn't get to see Court No.1. Still, we saw the two other courts, found loads of cells downstairs, and ventured into part of the police station before we got rumbled. I took a few externals months ago before the hoarding went up.... Reception Area Court No. 2 Court No. 3 Heading for the cells Check-in Counter The Cells Taking the piss Our friendly but confused escort showing us the towards the door Sneaky last pic before we left, the door to Court No.1 on the far right, the one that got away..... [ Thanks for looking
  7. Earls Court Exhibition Centre is a closed exhibition, conference and events venue in London that originally opened in 1887 and was rebuilt in 1937 in its most recent art deco style exterior. It is located in Earls Court within the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea and was the largest such venue within central London. The founder was John R. Whitley and the first exhibition included performances by Buffalo Bill Cody as part of the 'American Exhibition'. This was followed by 'Four National Exhibitions', the title of C. Lowe's 1892 book about Earls Court and its founder. Earls Court is widely known for serving as London's premier exhibition hall for many decades, hosting the Royal Tournament and Motor Show, Ideal Home Show, the Brit Awards (until 2010) and a number of other notable events and concerts. It was also used as one of the venues for both the 1948 and 2012 Olympic Games. It was served by two London Underground stations: Earl's Court and West Brompton, opposite the entrances on Warwick Road and Old Brompton Rd respectively. In 2013 controversial plans to demolish Earls Court were approved in order to make way for a new residential and retail estate on the site, which is expected to be completed in 2033. Demolition work began on the site in December 2014. With so many landmark sites in London it's simply a case of waiting for the next one to reach the end of it's life cycle. Earls Court exhibition centre's fate has been doomed for a while now, the hoarding went up last year and we'd nearly forgotten all about it until Maniac mentioned it in a conversation recently. Probably just big empty rooms with nothing in them we said to each other, but then as the conversation continued we started to wonder actually what might be lurking underneath the place and whether or not we might be able to access the roof. We made it a priority and got ourselves down there pronto with ojay and sirjonnyp. It's an absolute beast of a site (check out the aerial view later) and we weren't wrong in thinking there might be more to it. It took two long visits to get around the majority of it and I'm sure we still missed some bits. The main arena was like a scene from the apocalypse, rain falling from above and twisted metal railings strewn across the place. The labyrinth of service tunnels were hiding some epic plant and boiler rooms amongst other things. The roof contained the most gigantic gantry I've ever seen which enabled you to climb to the very top of the structure, happy days! A really satisfying explore this one and perhaps a last glimpse of one of London's most famous venues before it disappears off the planet. 1. Epic external shot found on google images, standard. 2. Entrance Hall 3. Main arena 4. 5. 6. Restaurant posters 7. 8. Some machines and bits around the perimeter of the arena 9. 10. 11. Service tunnels underneath 12. 13. Some old photos presumably taken here 14. Restaurant kitchen 15. There were 7 of these huge boiler tanks (I'm guessing that's what they are....), you can just about see through the door how long they are 16. 17. Plant room 18. Found this little control panel in there 19. The Roof 20. 21. Up on the gantry, I used incandescent white balance on this shot 22. 23. 24. The last climb to the top 25. Sketchy hand held shot looking down with the arena visible below 26. Taking a break at the very top of the roof inside one of the little black areas seen on the photo below 27.
  8. Various Visits with -Raz- and a selection of non members Bit of History; Built in 1806/7, this building was origninally the town hall for sheffield. It was extending in1833 and again in 1866 this time with the addition of the clock tower. In the 1890's the town hall was converted into the Crown court house as it was now too small for the growing population of sheffield to be a viable town hall. The courts used to be linked to the near by police station however these tunnels have now been bricked up. In the 1990's the courts moved to the new premisis and the last attendance was on the 27th of October 1995 leaving the old court house to rot. The building is now Grade 2 listed and is considered one of the most at risk buildings by the victorian society. Explores; Always a good one dispite the close proximity to the police station and high streets of lower sheffield, and the addition of the noisiest, most awkward entrance known to man, this is usually a quiet explore where you can really get a feel for the place. Every time i have been we have been joined by other explorers such as TrevBish. On one particular explore we arrived a little early so we slept in the courts for a few hours waiting for the place to get light! Never ever turn down a selfie oppurtunity! Apologies for the HDR in this one, i did go through a stage where everything was ruined by it If you got this far, thanks for reading
  9. After hearing this was closing at the end of last year, it went straight on my list and then promptly got forgotten about until I suddenly remembered about it when chatting with The_raw and others a few weeks back. So we set a date and went and had a look round. Probably shouldn't have left it so long really, demolition is well underway although they are only nibbling at bits of the structure at the moment and the roof has been removed from some of it. Unfortunately I didn't get to see any of the cool bits in the basement areas of Earls Court one, as the_raw and others covered those on the second night when I was otherwise engaged which was a shame as they look to be the most interesting bits. None the less it was pretty cool to have a look round the place. I have seen several bands here over the years so it brought back a few memories of those gigs as well as the time I went to the motorshow with by best friend when I was about 13 (21 years ago now!) Earls Court for those that don't know was the premier exhibition space in London for decades and hosted many prestigious events such as the royal tournament, the London motor show, the London boat show and many concerts and other events. It consists of two parts, Earls Court one which was built in its current form in 1937 and Earls Court two which was opened in 1991 (much later than I thought!) the two spaces were linked and could be used as one space or as separate spaces as required. The building for Earls Court one has a very distinctive art deco styling which I personally love and I will be quite sad to see this place go. I do understand why they've chosen to redevelop it as if you look around the place it is very antiquated when you compare it to modern exhibition centres and venues such as the Excel centre, but still it is a shame. One unique feature of Earls Court one was the concealed pool in the middle of it which was formed by lowering part of the floor in the middle of the space and then flooding it. The floor is supported on a combination of hydraulic jacks with lock-in rigid supports, enabling it to be used in its 'up position' for 'heavyweight' events such as the Royal Tournament, then lowered and flooded to give a 60 m long and 30 m wide pool between 2.5 m and 3 m deep (depending on usage). The 750-ton concrete exhibition floor can be removed and reinstated at the push of a button. When used it takes four days to fill and four days to empty and 2 1/4 million gallons of water are needed to fill it! Visited with The_Raw, JohnnyP, Ojay and then joined later by Sentinel Anyway, on with some photos :-) Earls Court One They are evidently preparing to put a tower crane in the middle of it, they've knocked a bloody big hole through the building. The base of the crane to go in was sitting next door in Earls Court 2. We managed to get onto the roof. It wasn't great as rooftops go, but was a nice mooch. View down the side of the building Various bits of plant were on the rooftop - they made buildings properly in those days, put this on the roof of a modern building and it'd end up on the ground floor! This was right at the very top of the place, these flaps opened to allow heat out of the building I think. Found the water tanks and plumbing for the sprinklers including some lovely old guages. Roof space which was a maze of gantries. I had a good mooch round the roof space, pretty sad but years ago I always used to look up and wonder how they strung up all the wires for things they hung from the roof for exhibitions etc. Well now I know. There were also various hefty power supplies for music events etc. concealed up here. This was possibly my favorite part of the explore even if some of of the walkways were very sketchy indeed. Then onto Earls Court two. This building is comparatively bland, but it was still quite nice to just walk round for a bit. Plant hidden behind the walls at the side Walkways either side of the hall Structure Cheeky shot on the roof in front of the sign And then there was this. I just snapped this photo randomly of one of the signs and didn't think anything of it, then when I got home just out of interest I delved into my ticket collection to find the tickets for the earls court gigs I'd been to and well . . . . So that's it, Earls court. Thanks for Looking, Maniac.
  10. Triton Court is arranged in three buildings, Mercury, Jupiter and Neptune Houses, internally these elements are arranged around a full height 9 storey central atrium. The building was originally constructed in 1920 with a major refurbishment and extension taking place in 1984. Currently it is being transformed into the Alphabeta Building, an office development contract worth £36 million. The project will see the transformation of 220,000 sq ft of office space for creative, media and technology occupiers with 22,000 sq ft of additional A1 retail and restaurant space on the ground and basement floors. I came here with monkey after a busy evening of rooftopping and beers. It was late, the sun was coming up and we were really pissed so we didn't hang around for too long. Cool to see London at that time of day though, can't wait for the summer for more of that. We fancied a bit more time up there so we went back up a little less pissed and a bit earlier this time, Slayaaaa came along for this visit too. Access is a bit bait now so if you fancy a pop at it you'd best be quick, much of the scaff has come down and they've removed the sheets which kept you hidden before. We were spotted by a couple of passers by who just waved at us luckily, apart from that it was plain sailing with a tiny bit of climbing to the top. How it looks without the scaff (not my photo).... .....and now Revisit A statue of the Roman God 'Mercury' stands on top of a globe at the highest point Lowndes House Thanks for looking
  11. Crookham Court Hi guys, first post here! Visited with Miss.Anthrope in December 2014, I wont put to much history up because you all know the place. A bit about the school: Crookham Court School, in Crookham Road, closed in the late-1980s after finding itself at the centre of a national scandal when three members of staff were convicted of sexually abusing pupils. The site comprises 7.32 hectare of land and contains Crookham House together with a number of outbuildings, including the chapel, stables, gym, classrooms/woodwork room/artrooms, portacabin flat, and various storage buildings. There is also a swimming pool, tennis court and playing fields on the site. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. Thanks for looking guys!!!!!!!!!!!!
  12. Crookham Court (sometimes called Harlequin Manor) is a mansion in Berkshire built around 1850, when a previous manor house on the same grounds was destroyed by fire. The building was added to over the next 50 years in two further phases. Crookham Court served many purposes over the years. Originally built as a family home, but later became a junior school for the children of military personnel serving at nearby RAF Greenham Common. Once the air force had left the area the house sat unused until 1961 when it was purchased and redeveloped for use as a boarding school. The school was operational until 1990, after which time the rooms were used as bedsits until 1997. A well-publicised case of child abuse by several members of staff was revealed in 1988 when a new head teacher took over the school. Three men were convicted including the principal who was also the owner of the building. Over 20 years later another teacher was also convicted when another victim came forward. Our Visit Not a lot to say about this one, this was the first stop on a day of exploring with Kriegaffe9. It was a shame to see the library has gone downhill somewhat over the last year, but the rest of place was only suffering natural decay, no signs of other damage. 1. Main Hall 2. Main Hall 3. Main Hall Side View 4. Main Hall 5. Hall with the fisheye lens 6. On the staircase 7. View from the top 8. Doors and wall Details 9. Green corridor 10. Steps in green corridor 11. Stained Glass Windows 12. The library still full of books 13. Sofa in the library 14. Sports hall 15. Changing room 16. Sports shirts and equipment 17. Gymnasium 18. Equipment in the gym Boarding room Ornate mirror in a boarding room Dressing room Next, we move into the other buildings around the site…. The science lab School-work left on the benches Store cupboard in the science lab Music room with piano Chapel Organ in the chapel Organ keys detail Thanks for looking. I have many more reports on my website - bcd-urbex.com
  13. 1. Court School 01 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 2. Court School 02 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 3. Court School 03 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 4. Court School 04 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 5. Court School 05 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 6. Court School 06 byMiaroDigital, on Flickr 7. Court School 07 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 8. Court School 08 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 9. Court School 09 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 10. Court School 10 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 11. Court School 11 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 12. Court School 12 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 13. Court School 13 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 14. Court School 14 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr 15. Court School 15 by MiaroDigital, on Flickr
  14. This was one for the first places I saw when I started this lark and always wanted to go and have a look, so last weekend my sparring partner and myself set off at a early hour and made our way down the M4. We got to our parking place and walked in. I must say we were very disappointed that we were unable to get into the main building due to new woodwork over some of the windows and doors. To make the most of it we headed into the other buildings avoiding the cottage at the front of the building. Still managed nearly a hour and half there so came away happy. Full set here https://www.flickr.com/photos/cunningplan/sets/72157646634353490/ That's all folks!!!!!
  15. So this was my first time visiting the Sheffield Courts, when the idea of visiting the place came up i was immediately looking forward to the day! This really is a great place to explore, take some shots and chill out Sheffield Old Town Hall stands on Waingate in central Sheffield, England, opposite Castle Market. The building was commissioned to replace Sheffield's first town hall, which had opened in 1700 to a design by William Renny. This first structure stood by the parish church, on a site with little prospect for extension. The Old Town Hall was built in 1807–8 by Charles Watson, and was designed to house not only the Town Trustees but also the Petty and Quarter Sessions. The initial building was a five-bay structure fronting Castle Street, but it was extended in 1833 and again in 1866 by William Flockton (1804-1864) of Sheffield and his partner for the project, Abbott; the most prominent feature was the new central clock tower over a new main entrance that reoriented the building to Waingate. At the same time, the building's courtrooms were linked by underground passages to the neighbouring Sheffield Police Offices. By the 1890s, the building had again become too small, and the current Sheffield Town Hall was built further south. The Old Town Hall was again extended in 1896-7, by the renamed Flockton, Gibbs & Flockton, and became Sheffield Crown Court and Sheffield High Court. In the 1990s, these courts moved to new premises, and since at least 1997 to present, the building remains disused. Visited with Goldie87. Heads up, rather pic heavy. Cheers, SM
  16. This was a fun explore. It was one I and a few mates had been keeping a close eye on whenever we were in the area. Since it's closure in 2011 I had visited 5 or 6 times to find no access, so when I got word from AdamX and a few others that there was a way in, it was exciting times. I went about 2 days after we got wind of the access with Zedstar, rolled up to have some fun and bang, just as luck would have it, 2 blokes working on unblocking the drains in the premises. So we went of and explored else where. Later that day, we popped back, but true to word these contractors were milking out the job in hand. So that was that then.. A few weeks later we were in the area again and tried our luck, mid week and with the rush-hour (well for this area) we waltzed in and had a good few hours exploring. The PIR had been triggered (as it had for everybody else) but be decided to just carry on taking photos. It was while we were looking about, we noticed things like the locks had been taken out of the cell doors and other small things like that, so the contractors are working there, but just guess we got lucky that day. HISTORY This court was one of a lot of the smaller ones dotted around the country that were closed, and with the added bonus of this one having a police station attached too. This is what was placed in one local paper about it all... Announcing the axing of 93 magistrates and 49 county courts, Justice Minister ****** ***** said: “We are closing the worst courts in the estate so we can concentrate our limited resources on the best ones. “It is unacceptable that dozens of buildings never intended to be, and not fit to be, modern court buildings are still in use.” Courts taking the extra workload would get £22m worth of modernisation and improvements So here we are,3 years later and we now have a even more stretched justice system, and it is getting more messed up. Through to the police station
  17. A couple of visits last year. Not many shots, but you seen it all before. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Thanks to Masa for the use of the legs 7 Can I pay now your honour Hope you enjoyed... Darbs
  18. With only 3 hours sleep and a raging hangover from a couple of ‘quiet’ beers the night before, this was never going to be an easy explore. Suffered some post beer injuries, and a nasty fall here! Finally got the camera back after being fixed, so hope you like my shots. The place is huge and enjoyed a few hours explore here. The courts were impressive, but it was the atmospheric cells that was the best part. I wander how many people have spent the night in those cells waiting to find out the fate of their life the next day. Group explore with the most excellent company of The Stig, Auntieknickers, H1971, King Mongoose, Altair, and some bloke called Ninja Wombat. This place was awesome, Thanks for having me along Sheffield Court House was commissioned to replace Sheffield's original Town Hall, which had opened in 1700 having been designed by William Renny. The Old Town Hall was built in 1807–8 by Charles Watson, and was designed to house not only the Town Trustees but also the Petty and Quarter Sessions. The initial building was a five-bay structure fronting Castle Street, but it was extended in 1833 and again in 1866 by William Flockton, the most prominent feature was the new central clock tower over a new main entrance that reoriented the building to Waingate. At the same time, the building's courtrooms were linked by underground passages to the neighbouring Sheffield Police Offices.The first Town Council was elected in 1843 and took over the lease of the Town Trustees' Hall in 1866. The following year, the building was extensively renovated, with a clock tower designed by Flockton & Abbott being added. By the 1890s, the building had again become too small, and the current Sheffield Town Hall was built further south. The Old Town Hall was again extended in 1896–97, by the renamed Flockton, Gibbs & Flockton, and became Sheffield Crown Court and Sheffield High Court. In the 1990s, these courts moved to new premises, and since at least 1997 to present, the building remains empty.In 2007, it was named by the Victorian Society as one of their top ten buildings most at-risk. The cells and finally, the external
  19. Crookham Court stands on the former site of Crookham manor house, built around the start of 14th century and destroyed in 1543, and subsequently Crookham House which was demolished around 1850. The construction of the current building started around this time and continued in two more phases over the next fifty years. It served several purposes over the years such as a manor house, a junior school and a school for children of people serving at Greenham Common. It was abandoned for some time after the US Air Force left the area and purchased in 1961 when it was used as a boarding school until 1990, after which point it was apparently used as apartments (although this isn’t too obvious from looking at the place) and has been abandoned since 2007. In 1988 there was a well-publicised case of child abuse by several members of staff which was covered on Esther Rantzen’s show That’s Life. This had apparently been going on for thirty years but it was only when the headmaster Mr. Gold joined the school in 1987 that it was discovered and reported. Three were convicted, including the principal who was the owner of the building. Over twenty years later the teacher who had been set free was also convicted when another victim came forward; he has tried appealing but been denied. Currently another of the old teachers is facing 57 charges relating to sex abuse, 20 of those charges are from his time at Crookham Court. It's a shame that this beautiful building has such a sordid history from recent years, it makes you feel a little uneasy knowing what went on in there. At least some justice has been carried out though and hopefully there will be more convictions to come. I visited with bassboyjoe who suggested the trip in the first place and did all the driving, top man. We turned up expecting to only have access to the outer buildings so we were well chuffed to find a way into the main bit, everything was accessible apart from the library room. That hall is just stunning, you could take pics in there all day long, there's a lot of other cool stuff to see all over the building too. Thanks to Joe for making this trip happen, I'd say a bit more if a didn't have a hangover the size of China, hope you enjoy my piccies! Thanks for looking
  20. Originally a court house then later on changed to a town hall. The outside holds a lot of promise from the front it looks like a castle! Sadly not as good inside but well worth a visit. 1 2 3 4 5 You really do bump into allsorts out exploring 6
  21. I travelled up to York for a wedding last week so decided to make the most of my time oop north and spent a couple of days in Sheffield. I visited the courts with Acid- Reflux who was kind enough to revisit the place on my behalf. Seeing as I had my suit with me I figured it would be rude if I didn't wear it in court. The policeman's hat was a last minute idea I had as I walked past a fancy dress shop the day before. Credit goes to Acid- Reflux for taking those shots I have to say this place is pretty spectacular, it's unbelievable to see all those beautiful mahogany court rooms and that staircase laying to waste. We were surprised to be the only visitors for the duration, I realise a lot of people have reported on this spot recently so I hope my take on it adds something a bit different. The History: Sheffield Old Town Hall stands on Waingate in central Sheffield, England, opposite Castle Market. The building was commissioned to replace Sheffield's first town hall, which had opened in 1700 to a design by William Renny. This first structure stood by the parish church, on a site with little prospect for extension. The Old Town Hall was built in 1807–8 by Charles Watson, and was designed to house not only the Town Trustees but also the Petty and Quarter Sessions. The initial building was a five-bay structure fronting Castle Street, but it was extended in 1833 and again in 1866 by William Flockton (1804–1864) of Sheffield and his partner for the project, Abbott; the most prominent feature was the new central clock tower over a new main entrance that reoriented the building to Waingate. At the same time, the building's courtrooms were linked by underground passages to the neighbouring Sheffield Police Offices. The first Town Council was elected in 1843 and took over the lease of the Town Trustees' hall in 1866. The following year, the building was extensively renovated, with a clock tower designed by Flockton & Abbott being added. By the 1890s, the building had again become too small, and the current Sheffield Town Hall was built further south. The Old Town Hall was again extended in 1896–97, by the renamed Flockton, Gibbs & Flockton, and became Sheffield Crown Court and Sheffield High Court. In the 1990s, these courts moved to new premises, and since at least 1997 to present, the building remains disused. In 2007, it was named by the Victorian Society as one of their top ten buildings most at-risk (most at risk of becoming the most over-explored building in the UK perhaps?). Exterior Cell block Court Rooms It was him.... It wasn't me.... The Stairs Other bits and pieces Clock Tower
  22. Hi All. Visited here back in October 2013. Visited with 3 non members. Was quite a good explore, with good views, a nice cold beer. Didn't bother with any internals, as i've been here before just for the internals! Non member on the mast Thanks for looking!
  23. Hi All. Quite an old explore of mine but thought i would share it on this forum! Hi All! These flats were stopped during 2008 when a local company "Hillstone Developments" went bust. They had some major developments which included six floors of apartments and retail units at The Victory, Union Street; 58 two-bed apartments at Cardinal Court, Scholes Street; 57 apartments at The Bank, the former NatWest Bank and Northern Carpets store in Mumps; and a 15-storey development at the old Gaumont Cinema building in King Street Had my eye on this for a while just for the views! Visited on my lonesome, External Shot of the shell of a building . . .. Looking over parts of Oldham towards Ashton Under Lyne Bluecoat School, Oldham - Where i went to secondary school Me looking over the main high street leading towards oldham and the shopping centre What the scaffolding has ended up like after 4 years in certain sections Oldham Metrolink station being built Looking towards Scouthead, Delph, Lees and various other areas . . Quick bit of tv All of the building inside is like this . . . Hope you have enjoyed! Don't know why i didn't do this one sooner but oh well!!
  24. Briefly the building was built to function as a Town Hall for Sheffield back in 1807 and was later adopted as the Crown Court. The clock tower as well as a significant extension which included a tunnel leading to the police headquarters was built at a later stage and the tunnel has since been sealed up. I have heard rumours recently that the court is currently owned by an American businessman who won the building in a bet (that must have been one hell of a game of high stakes poker) and has since been leased out for use as a set in various TV programs and films. Our Visit Visited with Mr Pete Costello (and his new freaky mask), Lowri, Sonyes, and Darbian. I’d been itching for a chance to revisit this one after our brief explore back in November 2012 and I think its safe to say that this visit was a success. I think I was the only one who had been before so I was really glad the other guys got the opportunity to see the place. It was my first visit carrying 2 camera bodies after recently purchasing a second hand second body and I despite being a pain in the arse to handle them both I’m glad as I managed to bag a few shots I would have otherwise missed while my main body was shooting long bracketed exposures. Some of the highlights include capturing most of the explore on gopro (I’ll sift through the footage and cut something together later, the freaky bang followed by footsteps that we heard and Lowri’s graceful exit . I’ll never get tired of this place. I definitely want to revisit this one again and do some more rooftop and work in the clock tower but I had a blast this time and finally managed to get a salvageable shot of the very dark Court Room No.1. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. L33t Photoshop Skillz: Thanks for looking more photos on my blog: http://www.proj3ctm4yh3m.com/urbex/2013/03/28/urbex-sheffield-crown-court-south-yorkshire-march-2013-revisit/
  25. The highlight on our Northern Road trip, visted with SX-RiffRaff, cheers pal for the driving ,after a rather noisey and quite a painful entry on the man gems, we got in - and what a treat! The lower levels where live, with signs of squatters in one of the lower rooms, with a working TV and Christmas lights (was tempting to stick them in a window;) ) there's about 3/4 main courts, but 2 being too dark to photograph, many other rooms, with secret passages staircases leading from the holding cells to the courts above. one of my favorite places so far! so yeah, here's some piccys =) Took this on the way out, just before we headed to a little cafe for breakfast, needless to say she was shocked to hear a kent accent this got a tad hairy, when a pigeon decided to sit on a rafter right above where i was climbing the ladder Thanks for reading! More on my flickr, http://www.flickr.com/photos/mperryphotography/
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