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  1. Somewhere in Germany, in a quiet park, lie those beautiful Tanks. Quiet park ? Not really, a military barrack nearby often throws training in this park, as the sign explained us kindly. 😂 We were lucky enough to dodge those training, even if i'm pretty sure it doesn't happen more than once a month, but still. We were not able to find which type of tanks it was, i read on the internet that it could be some M40 Patton or M41 Walker Bulldog, but i'm skeptical, as both of them were produced in the early 50's and were used in vietnam war and korea war, far from Germany. And, as they were demilitarized and trashed, the clues were hard to find. However, it was like a scene of war, one Tank crashed near a tree, another one half buried, very dramatic. Even if it was a short one, it was a very good exploration, with a lot of interesting light and very cool models.
  2. First report here, the well-known Chateau wolfenstein. Lost somewhere in the Belgian Ardennes, the castle was built 1931 by a rich Baron. It has many use throught the years, hospital, command centre during the war, care home for soldiers and, apparently some kind of jail for war and politic prisonners. Now, it 's still a part a the hospital complex but it is unused, except for a room where the hospital stocks some servers.
  3. It's been a while since I've posted anything. I though I would share something really cool, this is the Kenosha Theater. I have a thing for old movie palaces and I could not pass this up especially since I live pretty close to it. It technically isn't abandoned since a man owns it, but he dosen't have the money to fix it so it sits in it's abandoed state. I will also add that he does give tours to anyone. That's all I have to say so enjoy the decay.
  4. History In the 14th century the Bretton estate was owned by the Dronsfields and passed by marriage to the Wentworths in 1407. King Henry VIII spent three nights in the old hall and furnishings, draperies and panelling from his bedroom were moved to the new hall. A hall is marked on Christopher Saxton's 1577 map of Yorkshire... The present building was designed and built around 1720 by its owner, Sir William Wentworth assisted by James Moyser to replace the earlier hall. In 1792 it passed into the Beaumont family, (latterly Barons and Viscounts Allendale), and the library and dining room were remodelled by John Carrin 1793. Monumental stables designed by George Basevi were built between 1842 and 1852. The hall was sold to the West Riding County Council in 1947. Before the sale, the panelling of the "Henry VIII parlour" (preserved from the earlier hall) was given to Leeds City Council and moved to Temple Newsam house. The hall housed Bretton Hall College from 1949 until 2001 and was a campus of the University of Leeds from 2001 to 2007. Explore Work began on site in march 2016... The MüllerVanTol studio has been appointed to design the interiors of the Grade II listed mansion and the refurbishment of other listed buildings is well underway. Most of the 11 student dwellings which were built in the 1960's and 1970's have been demolished including Eglinton, Litherop, Swithen and Haigh, Grasshopper will be the last to go in late 2017. A real shame considering the position of the college which specialised in design, drama, music and other performing arts with notable alumna attending. The Hall itself resides in 500 acres of park land which is home to the Yorkshire Sculpture park (YSP). (YSP) was the first of it's kind within the UK and his the largest in Europe, providing the only the place to see Barbara Hepworth and Bronzes by Henry Moore. Over 300,000 visitors are said to visit the park each year and on previous visits its been easy to blend into the crowd and walk around the exterior of the old Hall this said access internally as always been restricted. Access to the Hall today is strictly prohibited and is protected by 6ft metal fencing which spans the entire grounds including former classrooms and the stable block and more so their is a high presence of security on site with the developers keen to keep the public away. Recently signs have appeared to restrict the public taking pictures near the Hall itself... typical signs read (restricted use of photography in this area). The developers seem to be going to extreme lengths to protect the design ideas of the Hall and are passing these restriction onto local media and staff working onsite... I'm guessing the developers are wanting to keep their plans secret until the grand opening later in 2019. During the festive Holiday period we decided to pay a visit... making our way to some of the former classrooms and the student centre. This led to the stable block passing by the former dwellings and down to the main hall. We were surprised to have got this far and would have been more than happy with some nice externals of the buildings on site. YSP was very quiet and we were aware of sticking out in the surroundings so decided to head inside. Making our way down to the hall we were sure we would be found before we had chance to pull out our cameras. We were quite taken away by the sheer scope of the refurbishment and the beautiful restoration work been carried out we soon forgot about the threats of been in the Hall. Slowly documenting our visit and proceeding through the Halls rooms we became aware our explore light could be attracting unwanted attention from the outside as daylight was running out. Turning it off where possible it was obvious that it would be shining like a beacon through the Halls many rooms, we decided to head out with the premise of returning in the morning. Unfortunately on our return we were met by the security who TBH was sympathetic in escorting us off the premises. It seems like our well documented day at Bretton Hall was a one off and maybe we will have to wait to see how the restoration unfolds when the Hall is reborn as an hotel. Pics 1. Entrance Arcade belonging to former stable block (circa 1800). 2. Beaumont Bull & Wentworth Griffin above the columns on each side of the archway below the cupola. 3. Lost student art outside the experimental theatre... former carriage house 4. Looking down the Colonnade 5. The stable courtyard 6. The south range of Bretton hall dates back to 1720 9. Giant pilasters supporting the pendent at the north range of Bretton Hall 8. Three storey nine-by-five-bay main range. 9. Pathway leading to the exterior of the former library 10. Former Orangery 11. Plaque detailing the history 12. Former dinning room with marble fireplace 13. Typical Rococo style in the former dining room 14. Typically their would have been a frieze around the fireplace 15. Looking up at the glazed dome 16. Looks like restoration as begun on the pendentives 17. Former drawing room with its spectacular baroque ceiling 18. Close a look at the baroque ceiling 19. Originally Regency Library then later converted to a display room. 21. Left overs from the colleague era 22. looks like works yet to begin in this area of the hall 23. Leading back to the library 24. restoration of the cove Acoustics to amplify sound in the music room 25. Light hanging from the Adam style celling 26. South ranges main staircase 27. Main staircase with a wrought iron railing 28. Stone stairs leading down to the basement 29. A form of art nouveau 30. Inside the main range 31. Coving shelves 32. Beautiful example of a transom window 33. Mid - century scandinavian style chair 34. Adam style celling's from 1770 35. Developer keeping with the original sash windows 36. Groin vaulted passage with three arches and piers decorated with grisaille paintings in the Portico Hall Added buildings from the former college days 37. The gymnasium 38. exterior of former classrooms 39. Former student centre reception 40. Corridoor leading to the classrooms 41. The student centre was empty 42. Damaged computer 43. Locked 44. typical student dormitory 45. recreational room 46. Entrance to one of the very few remaining former dormitory buildings The history of the Bretton Hall could be a thread all on its own ... as could the documentation of the architecture its position as educational faculty and importantly the future usage of the Hall as an entertainment venue. I've done my best to condense this were possible and in doing so have provided a comprehensive report regarding Bretton Hall.. Hope you enjoyed the report
  5. I think this was the most scariest thing i have ever done. A late night splore on a Russian sub. It involved knee deep mud and a dingy ride with one and a half oars. But Trog and SK done an amazing job. The sub itself was amazing, im glad i didn't bottle it but inside was so claustrophobic, i really dont know how people stay down there for so long. Splored with SK, Trog and peaches. Thanks for looking
  6. History Bishopgarth was first built in 1891 for the Bishop to live in. In 1946 the site became the West Yorkshire Metropolitan Police Training School. The classrooms were built in 1952 and the new block added in 1969 (the accommodation). There were 14 course's for training police men/women these course's included fingerprints, computer training, firearms, public speaking and traffic management. Bishopgarth could take a maximum of 250 students at any one time and usually there were 200 students staying at the on-site accommodation. To be a policeman you must be 5'9\" tall and for a policewoman 5'6" tall. This is the same as 166cm tall for policemen and 154cm tall for policewomen. The police moved to a new facility in Carr Gate in 2014. The Carr Gate complex houses Firearms, Driver, Public Order, Crime, IT, Foundation and Leadership and Development training. But the question is what will happen to the the now old and abandoned Bishopgarth police training well the first option proposed by the planners would see the entire site used for new homes, believed to be between 120 and 150. The second option would see the number of suggested homes reduced to include space for a residential care home. There is some more info on the matter here https://www.wakefieldexpress.co.uk/news/plans-for-150-homes-and-care-home-at-bishopgarth-1-6890284 1. Explore Upon arriving we noticed a massive metal fence around the perimeter, but we also noticed a lot of gaps in the fence as soon as we got walking down the drive way we got rustled by the security. We Looped around to the back where the alleged bishops palace is and snuck in through there... From getting into the bishopgarth area we headed straight to the accommodation building... we did this because we only really came for that building. When we got there we heard rustling, peeking around the corner and seeing a hi-viz vest it was security so quickly we had to run across the courtyard... thankful we missed the security, walking up the stairs to the main entrance of the accommodation building it was boarded so we looked around the whole permitter and found some boards ripped off at the side... looking around the building was like walking around a maze thankfully not a pitch black one thanks to our exploring light. Once we got past the first few floors what contained the dinning room and the main entrance it was just copy paste bedrooms and corridors. After we explored a floor of the bedrooms we got our assess up to the top floor AKA the roof access, we spent a while looking at the landmarks of wakefield and taking pics of the roof but it was hard because at this point we did not want to get spotted... running down the stairs to get out, had a lot more to explore!!! After the buzz of the accommodation building, we thought it would be hard to beat... ow god was we mistaken. After sneaking across the path we ran into the office/ classrooms... not much going on the outside of the building but once we entered (by opening the door) it was of its rocker! Walking in we had access to the bottom floor, very dark there were a couple classrooms and some office type looking buildings but the real deal was the top floor. We found the stairs after about 15mins of looking around... up the stairs were the IT classrooms and some offices with everything still inside. After we took pics of the upstairs, we wanted to get out but knowing there was the main entrance (with the automatic doors) we had a deeper look... finally we found it, did not expect wooden cladding, a safe, some nice stairs and some trash we was more than happy. But there was still some stairs to climb up... a whole new world (another corridor with some classrooms) the only bit worth looking at up there is the graffiti where the homeless slept. To end of on a positive note we thought we would have a look around the many 'houses' on the site... only getting in one which was a little outhouse at the back of the accommodation building... i say a little outhouse but if we bumped into that when we stared off we would have lost our minds. After that we got some more externals but we just wanted to get off really... PICS 2. 3. 4. Narrowly avoiding security 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. The admin office. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. SAFE 27. 28. 29. 30. LE FIN
  7. I got the chance to see this place with SK, and it was amazing. With the most gorgeous chimney's and fire places i have ever seen. I could have just moved right in. Thanks SK for the external shot Thanks for looking
  8. A bit of a revisit to see if anything had changed since my last visit in 2014 Well worth a look if your passing. Some History The Culvert in Ebbw Vale is along the River Ebbw Fawr, a stretch of just over a mile of the river was Culverted in 1937 to accommodate expansion of the steel works. The tunnel was originally a brick lined concrete arch for its entire length. In places it has raised walkways on either side, it is well documented that someone died in this Culvert from touching a live wire that some metal thieves had cut some years ago. Pics Thanks for looking
  9. Whats This a report from me NOOOOOO Wayyyy lol. Sorry aint been upping much hopefully that will change. Anyways i know a few been here etc but thought i would up mine. History: Not much im afraid and i aint copying anyone else. What i do know is a pub/club was underneath and its been up for sale quite a bit. Also it has some lovely terracotta walls etc . Explore: Visited on a invite from @GRONK after a little look with @stranton and mentioned it to gronk has it could be worth a visit has me and strant didn't get time. And even though a lot is trashed a lot was deffo worth the trip. And getting in well it was more open than some of the ladies of the night i have seen in both Leeds and Sheffield lol. A big difference from when me and strant went. Anyways on with what you want to see the pics. so enjoy all. A few shots from bar area .. Dont forget your coat lol.. Now my fave bits .. @GRONK getting in my shot lol The smell in here ffs was unreal. #URBEXPOO lol Ok thats it for now enjoy sll. Will deffo try to get some more done. If not before crimbo have a cracking Christmas all and a urbex filled 2018 for all. Thanks for looking.....
  10. Hi all a nice new report from me on a recent explore. This is a cracking little church with some awesome stuff still left and very photographic. And seeing has its close to christmas this seems like a good time to do it and post it. Some awesome stuff here like the tower and the bell. In what i coulden't resist to ring hell ive always wantd to have a go. But bloody hell its a lot louder than ya think lol. And that was via a little tap. Anyways met a few people here not to many just 4. So all in all was not to bad was expecting a coach to be here to be honest lol. So went with the missus and she loved every bit of it. It was a great place indeed not sure how much longer she got has wont be long before kids etc start to fook her up but for now shes a stunner. I'm sure you all going to like this one. Picked a cracking day for this has it was the village christmas party. So everone was busy. Can see why its stood the test of youth etc has its in an incredibly viewable place where loads of people can see what ya up to. And homes built right next to it practicaly on the ground lol. Anyways armed with a new camera thx to @ACID-REFLUX off we went. I would also like to add that the climb up the tower is a bitch and bloody narrow. The only shot i seem to have missed is that of the organ. Not to bad a loss has its in semi decent condition not sure how i forgot. Also there is a basement but a fat ass like me cant fit lol. And there is electric and water still on in this place. And has a word of caution in the tower the floors are in an extremely bad way. Major butt tightning. History : St John's was built between 1890 and 1892 to a design by the Lancaster architects Paley, Austin and Paley. The estimated cost of the church was �6,800 but, because of problems with the foundations, its final cost, including the fittings, was nearer to �12,000 (�1,170,000 in 2015). It provided seating for 616 people.Financial donations towards the site and structure of the church were made by Thomas Brooks, 1st Baron Crawshaw of Crawshaw Hall. Because of diminishing numbers attending the church, and because of thefts of lead from the roof of the church, the congregation has decided to opt for the church to be declared redundant. The church was declared redundant on 20 February 2012. The church is constructed in sandstone with Yorkshire stone dressings and is roofed in green Cumberland slate. Its architectural style is Perpendicular.[2] The plan consists of a nave and chancel in one range, north and south aisles, a south transept, and a north transept above which rises a tower. A clerestory rises above the aisles along the length of the nave, to the south of the chancel is a chapel, and to its north is a vestry. There is a porch in the westernmost bay of the south aisle, and another porch in the angle of the south transept.[2][6] On each side of the clerestory are ten square-headed two-light windows. The west window has five lights and contains intersecting tracery. Along the aisles are buttresses and two-light windows. The south transept also has buttresses, and a large five-light window containing Perpendicular and curvilinear tracery. The chancel has a large east window with six lights containing Perpendicular tracery. The tower has diagonal corner buttresses that rise to octagonal turrets surmounted by crocketed pinnacles. The summit of the tower has an embattled parapet.[2] Interior The interior of the church is lined with red Rainhill sandstone.[6] The five-bay arcades are carried alternately on round and octagonal columns. The chancel arch is high, and has two orders of moulding. There are carved wooden screens between the nave and the chancel, and between the chancel and the north transept. Some of the choir stalls have elaborately carved crocketed canopies containing statues.[2] The reredos dates from the 20th century, and contains statues of the Four Evangelists. The font is hexagonal. In the church are memorials to members of the Brooks family.[6] Inside the tower, and near to the tower, are carved texts from Psalm 148.[5] The Church of England Commissioners had agreed the sale of the church to a small non trading renewable energy company in 2013. However a planning application was rejected in January 2015, as the plans involved the removal of 80% of the tree's on the site, most of which have Tree Preservation Orders on them. The siting of one 40ft and two 20ft used shipping containers in place of the tree's was also cited by planners the reason for rejecting the scheme.[9][10] As the site has been removed from the Church's list of buildings for sale, its current status is unknown. PICS: Christmas shots lol The bell .. It goes DONG loudly lol Really pissed at this shot has i really really wanted it. But was major dark and fooking floor moves and shit the shit being bomb diving bloody pidgeons sure these fookers take after an old japanese custom lol. Sorry for blur but give ya idea of it. Atleast the inside bell shot came out ok. The tower stairs Sorry for pic heavy just so much to shoot. Anways these last 2 are my faves so will say thanks for looking and have a good christmas all. Merry christmas have a great time and thanks for looking at the stunning church.
  11. Hello! Voilà je me décide enfin à publier cette petite explo qui date de fin décembre. Et maintenant ça va être un peu dur d'aller faire de l'explo car je me retrouve actuellement en béquilles... Bref mais si vous passez par la Touraine je peux quand même aller boire un verre avec vous si le cœur vous en dit. Après avoir hésiter plusieurs fois à rentrer dedans par rapport aux différents affichages on décide d'y rentrer malgré tout, ce fût une bonne chose et une belle découverte. Dommage qu'il ait eu beaucoup de changement depuis les premières photos que j'avais pu voir... Pourquoi l'hôpital du lion volé? Dans la grande cage d'escalier se trouvait un lion sur le début de celle ci qui fût surement arraché... Bien dommage car je me réjouissais de le voir enfin. Je vous laisse découvrir ce lieu en photos: GOOGLE TRANSLATE: Hello That I finally decided to publish this little explo dating from late December. And now it will be a little hard to go to explo because I now find myself on crutches ... short but if you go through Touraine I can still go for a drink with you if your heart tells you . After hesitating several times to get into it with respect to different views we decide to go there anyway, it was a good thing and a great discovery. Too bad it has been much change since the first pictures I had seen ... Why the hospital stolen lion? In the great staircase was a lion in the beginning of this one which was probably ripped ... Well shame because I was looking forward to finally see. I let you discover this place in pictures:
  12. George Barnsley and sons, a key toolmakers in Sheffield's history, well at least for us lot.. Heres a small set for you i took a few months back now enjoy:p THanks ........
  13. This one was at the top of my list for a while. So when the day came, I don't know why I lacked motivation...I hardly spent anytime taking photos, and in hindsight, now I'm gutted about that. Still, never mind. I have my memories, and lots of blurry photo's. Anyway, every man and his dog have been here, so I'll spare you the history. Thanks for looking
  14. I was dead excited to see this place, then the day before we came a report was posted saying it had been sealed up. Gutted! Then to our amazement, we found a window, unboarded and open. Mazel tov!!! Shame to see this place so trashed. The metal has gone, the flooring is being nicked and all the Jewish stuff wrecked Thanks for looking
  15. I think almost everyone knows it now. The monument on the 1441 m high mountain was opened in 1981 to the 1300 anniversary of the founding of the state of Bulgaria by the Communist Party (Socialist Workers Party). It's the largest ideologically motivated building in the country. After a 2.5 hour flight to Bucharest / Romania end of December 2013, I needed for the nearly 300 km drive (partly in fog and on icy mountain roads) another six hours, until I had finally arrived ... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
  16. Been here a few times now and still the place ceases to amaze me, it's as mad as a bucket o frogs!! The water that cascaded down through the mine seems to have stopped flowing, resulting in less bacterial growth and a lot less colour, still worth a visit though. Some history; The entrance Fresh air
  17. The castle was built in the 18th century. During World War II it was occupied by German troops and eventually used as mother-child home. After the war it was among other things used as an orphanage. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26
  18. So after visiting the carehome in Malvernbury, a drive to Greggs for an unhealthy meal of Sausage Rolls fresh out of the oven so they were NUCLEAR and a coffee for Landie, we took a slow afternoon trundle to a small village outside Malvern to this disused Waste Incinerator. Theres very little on Beacon Waste Incinerator but it is thought to have closed in the early noughties, but the rot has really set into some of the steelwork inside and its slowly returning to nature. This site was on a tiny network of B-roads mostly single track with passing places, so getting 10,20,30,40 Ton trucks down these lanes would not have been easy and I would have thought the smaller traffic would have spent a lot of their time reversing to the nearest passing place. The site was owned and operated by Worcestershire County Council; and legally the land use is still of a waste incinerator facility. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157650082281742/
  19. Crookham Court Hi guys, first post here! Visited with Miss.Anthrope in December 2014, I wont put to much history up because you all know the place. A bit about the school: Crookham Court School, in Crookham Road, closed in the late-1980s after finding itself at the centre of a national scandal when three members of staff were convicted of sexually abusing pupils. The site comprises 7.32 hectare of land and contains Crookham House together with a number of outbuildings, including the chapel, stables, gym, classrooms/woodwork room/artrooms, portacabin flat, and various storage buildings. There is also a swimming pool, tennis court and playing fields on the site. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. Thanks for looking guys!!!!!!!!!!!!
  20. The property was built only in the 1920s, later it was used as an agricultural school. In parts destroyed by a fire and abandoned in the mid-80s. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
  21. Already built in the late 19th century. Also political prisoners were incarcerated here. Mid-20th century it was closed and used as a museum. Abandoned and in decay since the Romanian Revolution of 1989. Normally the prison is guarded and not easily unseen accessible, because the guardian lives directly on the site. But fortunately the guard was not at home and a hole in the wall gave access into the building... 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 (Not a fake, the rays are real.) 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
  22. Past sunday I visited this incredible Chateau. Lots of decay. Enjoy...
  23. Today I visited this old graveyard somewhere in Belgium.
  24. I first visited this place over three years ago in October 2011 - back then the place was absolutely mint, totally untouched by vandals and even had the electricity still on. Well what a difference three years makes, stepping foot in here again was like stepping into another world. The pipes got ripped out and the lead off the roof stolen at some point in 2012 which meant water has poured throughout most of the building, which doesn't sound good but as most of the furniture and small items are still left inside (even the packet of co-codamol I found in the office back in 2011) it has lead to the place becoming full of amazing decay and some serious mould issues! I loved it when it was a minter and it looked like everyone had just gone on a day trip to the seaside to be back in the evening, but I similarly loved it in it's much more decayed state. The first floor is a minefield of missing floorboards from where the pipes have been taken out, and the top floor has had a large amount of ceiling come down so it's proper sketchy in parts... Thanks for looking, more from this visit here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157647534095844/ If you want a comparison, here are my photos from October 2011 https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157627925825550/
  25. After finishing in Malverbury and having the now regular bog-standard explore lunch which involves raiding the nearest Greggs of their sausage rolls and steak bakes me and Mr. Landie Man headed off in the direction of somewhere I'd always been meaning to drop by but never got the chance, or always found something better to do. As it happens I really enjoyed it here, a nice big industrial derp to get the juices flowing. The Beacon Waste Incinerator was used by Worcestershire County Council to dispose of waste, and ceased operating in the early 2000s. The large building sits quietly rusting away down what is basically a farm track in the middle of nowhere - god knows how they got the trucks down there to the incinerator. A nice chilled explore to end the day on and I'm glad I finally ticked it off. Thanks for looking, more here https://www.flickr.com/photos/mookie427/sets/72157649458513568/
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