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  1. This one has a bit of a bittersweet ending for me really/. It's practically on my doorstep but I didn't find out about it till about 2016/17 and it closed in 2010 with much disgust from the locals! I had tried and failed it numerous times because of either filming taking place on site; or workmen. I went to check it out just before Christmas and found it to have a small demo crew inside who very kindly granted me 15 minutes in the pool area only, and they came and checked on me every 3 or 4 mins. It had been partly gutted by this point and they were so nice, I kept to my word and only left with a few photos. Hints were dropped of the quietness of the site around the Christmas Period; but I had my disabled partner, Pearl staying for a few weeks, and I had booked several weeks off work to be with her as to me, that was far more important!!! So I didn't bother returning. Still; I am also glad I didn't leave empty handed! #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157676566144727
  2. The end was nigh for Mookster and my North Midlands Roadtrip back before Christmas. Mookster remembered seeing this site when visiting the Crich Tramway Museum in the 1990s and had made it a goal to visit it when he discovered it had not been demolished, he previously thought it had. We parked in the Museum and walked up the driveway to the site. An older chap and some friends who frequent the site and had keys, had been feeding the birds and we exchanged some pleasantries; "As long as your not smashing anything, go for it"; was the general opinion; so we filled our boots. Sadly; much is inaccessible due to flooding; and it is overall, pretty trashed, but it had some great photo ops! I enjoyed it, and the lighting the evening was producing. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 Thanks for Looking! More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157678698751578
  3. Another weekend, another backlog! I really need to streamline my reporting process! Part of a little day out with Mookster back before Christmas, we did this Tourist Trail steelworks; and it was a rather nice morning out; albeit a little smashed inside. The works were originally established in 1855 with an office staff of four, three small furnaces, a small foundry; plus iron fields at Stanton and in the neighbourhood parish of Dale Abbey, and the Ironstone Bell pits at Babbington. Messrs George and John Crompton; the three founders; were brothers and partners in the firm of bankers of Crompton and Evans - Mr Newton and Mr. Barber. In the infant years; the pig iron was made entirely from local ore, but in 1865 Northamptonshire ores were introduced into the mixtures; with iron mines in Leceistershire and Northamptonshire acquired and developed. In 1878 the pipe foundry, now potentially the largest in Great Britain, and possibly the world, was started under the management of Mr James Chambers. Circa 1914; the company had 7000 people on its pay roll - 3000 here at Stanton, the same number at the collieries and 1000 at the ironstone mines. In 1951 it was nationalised and became part of the Iron and Steel Corporation of Great Britain. A takeover in 1960 by Stewarts & Lloyds Ltd happened. and was merged with Staveley Iron & Chemical Co. to form the Stanton & Staveley company. In 1967 Stanton & Staveley was incorporated into British Steel. During the early 1980s the Stanton site became part of the French Pont-a-Mouson Group and later part of Saint Gobain, manufacturing cast iron pipes. Production finally ceased on May 24th 2007, and subsequently a huge amount of the site was demolished around 2009/2010. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 #17 #18 #19 #20 #21 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157678405612458
  4. A rather apt explore after exploring an Iron Works earlier in the morning! After Stanton, Mookster and I headed for this little industrial Gem and met Mattdonut and James Smith inside. It was a bit of a trek through some undergrowth and tumbledown sheds full of all the old moulds and casts; but it was well worth it. The original company at this premises began manufacturing cast iron pipes back in the 1940s. By the 1980s; there was a management buy out and the company was renamed. It then closed again around two decades later and again; changed hands and was renamed; remaining in operation until it closed for the final time a few years ago. The whole site is split in two by a lovely iron railway bridge with the casting storage sheds and workshops on one side and the main foundry building on the other side of the bridge. It was a lovely treasure trove of an explore with plenty to see inside! #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 #16 Thanks For Looking! More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157706470238285
  5. History In 1919 Leeds Corporation rented Meanwood Park to provide a ‘colony’ for the mentally handicapped, which was formally opened on 3rd June 1920, although the first patient had been admitted in the previous year. In 1921 the Corporation bought Meanwood Park estate and surrounding land totalling in all one hundred and seventy eight acres, from Sir Hickman Beckett Bacon of Thonock, Gainsborough, grandson of Sir Thomas Beckett. Originally 87 patients were accommodated in the Hall, but during the following twenty years villas were built in the grounds and by 1941, beds were provided for 841 patients. The Hall by then referred to as ‘The Mansion’ was used for other hospital purposes. MPH was taken over by the NHS in 1948 and administered by Leeds. It is now the responsibility of the Leeds Eastern Health Authority and accommodates about 460 residents. The hospital was controlled by Leeds Corporation. The Hospital trained nurses in a room in the children’s school. Male nurses lived on the wards, on the farm or male hostel. No meals or catering facilities were provided for non resident staff. In 1946 some villas were used by the military for convalescent cases. Most of the Villas were locked. No child under 14 was allowed to visit. Relatives and friends were allowed to visit once a month. Patient’s mail was censored in the Chief Male Nurses office. The CMN was Mr Parson’s. One free stamp a month was issued to patients. Many of the patients at that time were literate. If they behaved they were given a pass which allowed them a few hours weekend parole. Passes were signed by the Medical Superintendent. Patients were awarded 6d per week or a bar of chocolate. The Chief Male Nurse and the Matron were paid on the number of beds. They had their own sides of the hospital, male and female patients mixed only at dances and church services. A few historical photo's I found online Visit I visited with @hamtagger at the beginning of December. i'd seen this pop up online and quite liked the look of it. Now I will say, there really isn't much to see at all but I was really happy with the place. The decay was nice and mature, had some nice features reminiscent of its times. The whole place is surrounded by a newly built residential estate with the closest house literally 75 years away from the Hall itself and its like this all around. we had quite a nice leisurely paced explore round it, a really random room in the middle of the place with really modern furniture which threw us a little bit. The explore became a bit smelly about 3/4 of the way through when @hamtagger decided he needed a shit. I'm pretty sure he even killed a few pigeons with the stench! now you'd think that with a nice airy building the smell would disappear quite quickly and I'm not one to be bothered much by smells but even I was heaving. So, apologies to future explorers although I'm sure its safe now! 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Thanks for looking!
  6. A n abandoned hospital that did not meet the new norms. It took some effort to gain access to this one. I did this one alone so my senses were working overtime. First thing I heard was the tik tak of some mechanical clocks so i named this one l'hopital tiktak. Electricity is still on, sensors of the automatic doors and lights still working. Went to a great part of this massive hospital but still not seen everything because I was expecting security tu turn op any moment so after less then 1h30 I went back home. Maybe I'll revisit this one soon for the other parts. Missed the morgue. Hope you enjoy this. 1 going up IMG_3506-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 2 go into the light IMG_3503-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 3 where is the lab result? IMG_3509-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 4 working in the sunshine IMG_3510-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 5 lay down your head IMG_3500-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 6 at an angle IMG_3497-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 7 flashing re light IMG_3496-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 8 OK 1 start the timer IMG_3493-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 9 take a rest IMG_3488-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 10 backache IMG_3466-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 11 the underground IMG_3463-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 12 spare material room IMG_3461-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 13 ok2 also in the race IMG_3471-Edit by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
  7. This turned out to be a good day out with @SpiderMonkey and Exxperious. This is a big site, by far the largest RAF base I've explored in terms of area covered, so we spent the whole day looking around it. History of RAF Bentwaters RAF Bentwaters is a former Royal Air Force station in Suffolk, named after Bentwater Cottages, two small houses that stood on the site of the main runway prior to its construction. Construction of the base began in 1942 for use by RAF Bomber Command and opened for operational use in April 1944. In December that year it was transferred to No. 11 Group, RAF Fighter Command. The runways were constructed in the typical RAF layout of one main runway diagonally intersected by two secondary runways, forming a triangle. The base was used by the RAF during the Second World War, and then used by the United States Air Force from 1951 until 1993, primarily for efforts during the Cold War. Bentwaters was to play a key role in the defence of Western Europe during the Cold War when large numbers of USAF aircraft were assigned as part of the air arm of NATO. Current Uses Bentwaters was handed back to the UK Ministry of Defence in 1993 and was subsequently closed. Now known as Bentwaters Parks, the site is used as a business park and filming location. Owners are constantly developing the filming and production facilities available at the site. Movies and TV programmes filmed there include Derren Brown's Apocalypse, movies The Numbers Station and Fast & Furious 6, along with some Top Gear stunts, amongst others. In 2007 the Bentwaters Cold War Museum opened, including tours of the fully restored “War Operations Room” and “Battle Cabin”. Aerial view of the site after becoming Bentwaters Parks Star Wars Building The so-called “Star Wars Building” is surrounded by concrete blast walls and contains some interesting spaces including a medical room. The Star Wars Building Concrete blast walls Entrance of the Star Wars Building Medical Facility Bomb Stores Built during the Cold War to securely store nuclear and conventional weapons, the bomb store was heavily fortified with three layers of fencing, razor wire, a swing-arm vehicle barrier, two gates, pressure pads, armoured guard house, guard tower and overhead cables to keep helicopters out. We didn’t get passed the gate! Entrance to the Bomb Stores Armoured Guard House One of the storage facilities with overhead cables One of the store buildings had a couple of old fire engines parked up behind it.... Planes and Helicopters There are all sorts of jet aeroplanes and helicopters parked up around the site, in varying states of decay and dismantlement. Exxperious modelling his entry into "Miss Fighter Jet 2018" K-9 Building The K-9 building contains spacious dog kennels. K-9 Building Kennels inside the K-9 Building Hangers The site has a lot of hardened aircraft shelters, or hangers, spread out across a vast area. Several are in use by private companies, and others are empty. A common feature of the hangers is the huge sliding doors that form the entire hanger's frontage – these slide to the side on rails to open up fully allowing access for aeroplanes. One of the many hangers Typical interior of the hangers Original sliding door controls The framework sits on rails and supports the huge doors, allowing them to slide fully open 527th Aggressor Squadron Hardened Aircraft Shelter Deputy Commander Operations This building had been out of use for quite some time and is suffering a lot of decay. The moisture and condensation cause constant rainfall inside the building, which was ideal for plant growth. Deputy Commander Operations building Runway, Control Tower and Maintenance Vehicles We didn’t make it over to the control tower, which is situated within the live business park area of the site. The runway still has some of the maintenance and de-icing vehicles parked up. The Control Tower pictured in 1972 The Control Tower today (poor quality due to crazy crop, as we didn't go over there!) North/South runway with the control tower in the distance De-icer truck The Hush House Originally built as a jet engine testing facility with an exhaust tunnel, the Hush House was a soundproofed hangar where fighter Exterior of the exhaust tunnel Interior of the Hush House The exhaust tunnel Hush House control booth and viewing window Thanks for looking! Of course I got a selfie!
  8. The History Largely from wiki: Millmoor was was the home ground of Rotherham County F.C. between 1907 and 1925 and then their successors Rotherham United F.C. until 2008. The team and ground were once owned by C.F. Booth, whose huge Clarence Metalworks and scrapyard overlooks the site. When Ken Booth sold the club in 2004 he kept the freehold to the stadium and leased it back to the club in return for £200,000 a year rent and preferential advertising options and ticket allocations. In 2008 the relationship between the two parties broke down and Rotherham United left Millmoor for the Don Valley Stadium, before moving into their present ground, the New York Stadium, in 2012. The Explore All in all a pretty relaxed mooch. The scrapyard next door is huge and noisy but everybody is too busy to be paying much attention to the stadium. All of the internal areas of the ground are heavily stripped but in good condition, with the custody suite and cells being particularly interesting. The stands are in fairly good condition and the pitch itself appears to be maintained with Wiki suggesting it's seen periodic use for youth football. Being the genius that I am I left everything but a 35mm prime lens at home and arrived about 40 minutes before sunset so apologies for the slightly odd perspectives. The Photos I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. If you're anywhere vaguely near Sheffield and want to link up then drop me a line. Cheers, Thirteen.
  9. Did not see many reports from this hospital. It was one that was in the process of demolition. One wing was already gone but this gave me an nice access to the basement through the rubble. It felt strange. the heating was still on,power and the clocks were also working.. Some of the x-ray machines were still powered on.Probably part of the building was still in use,as there was an ambulance in the garage.But i heard of rumours that there was an alarm there,so didn't explore this vehicle. Since I was alone this time, my senses were working overtime.At a certain time, I saw a vehicle of security parked outside of the building ,while I was on the top floor.Time to leave.I went back to the entry point,where the basement was in A pile of rubble and heard people going in just above me. Then I left via the back because the car was still parked at the front. A nice explore, at the last day of the year. 1 the kitchen area IMG_0316 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 2 Hallway with names of the persones who worked there IMG_0323 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 3 one of the rooms IMG_0327-HDR by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 4 sad looking lamp IMG_0332-HDR by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 5 ready for scanning IMG_0362 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 6 also ready for use IMG_0369 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 6 already 15.45 ? IMG_0379 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 7 more exam's today ? IMG_0371 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 8 look into the light please IMG_0394 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr 9 to the children's ward IMG_0373 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
  10. History Pinched from other reports on here: Milford was named for its river-crossing, on an ancient route from Derby to the Peak district. Jedediah Strutt, a farmer turned hosier, recognised the potential of the site. The Inventor of the Derby rib machine, Strutt owned a Derby silk mill, and had set up cotton mills in Belper. In 1781, he bought land in Milford to build a cotton spinning mill. It was one of a series of textile milles constructed on the Derwent between Matlock and Derby during the Industrial Revolution. These pioneering developments, which included the creation of new communities to house and cater for the workforce they required, are now recognises as being of international importance. The Milford Mill complex eventually included spinning, bleaching and dying mills, as well as foundries, joiners’ workshops, a gas-works and a corn-mill. The Warehouse, constructed in 1793, was an early attempt by William Strutt, Jedediah’s eldest son, to design a fire-proof multi-storey structure. The Strutt's success transformed Milford from a riverside hamlet into a company village. They built a school, created several farms to supply produce for their workers and helped establish the village’s various religious and social buildings. The remaining buildings are just fragments of a much larger site, mostly demolished through the 1960s and 1970s. More recently the site had been mixed industrial/commercial units, with part of the site forming an antique centre. Currently it sits empty with the forecourt used as a car wash on weekends. The Explore Generally I write something along the lines of things being a 'relaxed mooch' in this section. Having initially headed to Derwentside Industrial Park to see what was left of the Abru factory (A: Lots of rubble) I I had a fairly clumsy entrance over some barbed wire at Milford in full view of the adjacent A-road. Cut my hands and shredded my jeans a little but nothing too disastrous. Inside it's all pretty heavily graffed and stripped. Not sure I'd go so far out of my way to go back. After wandering around for an hour it becomes apparent that there are other people on the site. Given my ungraceful entrance I assumed it was security. Cue a 45 minute game of hide and seek. Transpires there are six people congregated in front of the gate. The site is encircled by a river so there are no alternative avenues of escape. After waiting and watching for a further half hour my patience fails and I decide to approach. Turns out one of the blokes was (I assume) an estate agent. THe look on his face when I, the scruffy, unshaven bloke with ripped clothes and hands covered in blood and rust came towards him was priceless. He was polite but asked me to leave immediately and I walk purposefully towards the gate. I try to open it for the most awkward couple of minutes of my life before an exasperated security guard has to walk over and do it for me. All in all not my smoothest moment. The Photos I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. If you're anywhere vaguely near Sheffield and want to link up then drop me a line. Cheers, Thirteen.
  11. Monkton Farleigh Down, Ammunition Tunnel, Wiltshire – December 2017 Moving on through my backlog of explores; to one myself and Mookster visited back in December. It was to be a nice, slow paced Pre-Christmas day of explores; but sadly this was to be the only site we explored that day. Unfortunately my car had developed an exhaust leak that morning and the rest of the day was rather noisy until the vehicle was repaired. The Monkton Farleigh ammunition depot made use of an old stone quarry below a plateau; around 450 feet above the valley floor in which ran the main line railway. This railway was its principal source of supply. Before the depot could be commissioned, an efficient means was required to bring in ammunition from the railway at Farleigh Down Sidings. These sidings were just over a mile from the depot as the crow flies but over four miles by road along pretty heavy going, tortuous country lanes. The tunnel at Monkton Farleigh was designed to handle around 1000 tons of ammunition each day. Completion was not scheduled until 1941. The tunnel to the railway sidings at Shockerwick was a big player in the Monkton Farleigh mine; offering a secure route which in turn, was invisible to aerial reconnaissance. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 As Always everyone, Thanks! More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157665020437557
  12. History W. T. Henley was a cable/wire company that was founded in a small London-based workshop in 1837. William Thomas Henley is famous for having converted his old lathe into a wiring covering machine which was used to cover wire with silk and cotton as this was in high demand at the time for electromagnetic apparatus. It is reported that Henley’s company progressed at an impressive rate and that he pioneered the submarine cable field (laying cables on the sea bed between land-based stations to carry telecommunication signals across stretches of ocean).It was Henley’s dream that all of civilisation would eventually be linked together telegraphically. As WT Henley’s Telegraph Works continued to prosper, Henley decided to purchase a factory at North Woolwich beside the Thames in 1859 for £8,000. It is said that this development led to the laying of the Persian Gulf telegraph cable which is 1615 miles long, for the Indian Government. As a result, by the end of 1873 Henley’s Woolwich site had spread to cover some sixteen acres and his company also included three cable laying ships and a four-hundred-foot wharf to allow five-hundred-ton ships to load and unload their cargo. Sadly, Henley died in 1882; however, his company continued to grow in his absence and went on to form branches across the country. By 1906 work on a new factory in Gravesend was completed. The new factory is said to have been an impressive development and it included extensive, purpose-built, laboratories and a modern reinforced concrete air-raid shelter under London Road that could hold approximately two-thousand people. The tunnels were built into old caves within the Rosherville Gardens – an area of land located between the cable works and the cliff face. It is likely that the air-raid shelter was factory-owned but also open to the public as Henley’s company did not actually own Rosherville Gardens at the time and it featured a number of amenities and six entrances. Henley’s company continued to thrive as the Victorian era ended; however, its success can be linked directly to the Great War as it was a catalyst for technological and industrial development and change. By the Second World War, Henley’s company was publicly praised for its contribution towards King and Country – particularly its contribution to ‘Operation Pluto’ (the construction of petrol pipelines across the English Channel). Despite this success, a decision was made to close the main Henley factory at Woolwich due to the repeated damaged it suffered during the war years. A new factory was subsequently built at Birtley in the North East due to its reputation for being a ‘misty valley’ that made it difficult for the Luftwaffe to target factories, and this was completed in 1950. Sadly, a change of events occurred in 1958 when AEI acquired Henley’s company, having already taken over Siemens Bros in 1953. However, AEI is now the world’s oldest cable company and recently celebrated its one-hundred and seventy-fifth anniversary. Unfortunately, Henley’s Gravesend site was closed in 2008, though, due to it being ‘no longer viable to operate because of strong European competition’. Our Version of Events Not much by way of events for this one. It’s been a very busy few months and we ended up here to take a break after doing a spot of house viewing. Since we’d spent all day and most of the evening looking at damp, shitty rental properties that all looked as though they ought to be photographed and placed as reports on here, we arrived outside AEI in the early hours of the morning. Armed only with the essentials, our tripods, cameras and cans of Stella Artois, we made our way over the epic bog that you have to cross to find the entrance to the old shelter. We really underestimated how muddy this bit of wasteland was going to be to be honest and very nearly ended up taking a cold midnight mud bath several times. Nevertheless, we eventually made it across, with all our beers intact you’ll be happy to know. From this point onwards, getting into the old shelter was pretty straightforward. Once inside, we immediately set about taking our snaps. There was a shared feeling among us that the heavy feeling of tiredness was impending so we wanted to get the hard bit of the explore out of the way quickly. It didn’t really take long to photograph the place in the end though, once we’d worked out the general layout of the structure which is a grid-like setup. This left us with plenty of time to each pull up a chemical toilet and enjoy a few bevvies. And that’s how it ended. The tins were cracked and we sat wondering what it would have felt like to hear explosions outside and the thunder of guns shaking the paint and dirt from the ceiling. In reality, all we could really hear was a superb silence and the odd drip coming from a room to our left. What better way to finish an explore, with beers in hand and an abundance of chemical toilets at the ready. Explored with Ford Mayhem. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 9: 10: 11: 12: 13: 14: 15: 16: 17: 18: 19: 20: 21:
  13. This one has been long in the making and a good way to end 2017. I've been to the newer bit more times than I care to admit, however the older bit had alluded me for a long time. After multiple visits and too many fails to count we finally managed it with a bit of good timing and dash of good luck. I'd heard that it isn't going to be too long till the place is getting flattened so it was a bit of a now or never explore. History "In 1899, Sutton Cottage Hospital officially opened its doors to the public. At the time, the hospital housed just six beds, and operated from two semi-detached cottages in Bushy Road, Sutton. As the population of Sutton grew, so too did the hospital. In 1902, the hospital moved to a new site, which consisted of four small wards, an administrative block and contained a total of 12 beds. It was at this point that the hospital became known as Sutton Hospital. In 1930, the hospital began the expansion process again, this time with a purpose-built clinic at the current site. In 1931, the new hospital was officially opened. When the National Health Service (NHS) was implemented in 1948, the hospital was incorporated into the St Helier group. The hospital continued to receive support from voluntary activity and charitable organisations. By 1950, further beds for inpatients were desperately needed and two further wards were added. Late in 1957, a new outpatients and pharmacy was added to the complex. By now, people were beginning to live longer and the increasing number of elderly people requiring care was putting added pressure on the hospital. A new geriatric rehabilitation unit was opened in 1959. In 1983, a district day surgery unit was opened, meaning that patients could be treated and discharged within the same day. During 1990, the hospital underwent further improvements, and a work began on building an orthopaedic surgery. Patients first arrived for treatment here in January 1991." There were 3 blocks, Block A, B and C. >Block A is filled with half the pigeon population of Sutton and is truly vile. I might eventually get round to doing it properly, but its not an appealing one! >Block B is well decayed, but still has a quite a few things left inside and isn't too disgusting. The best one IMO. >Block C is very clean apart from a bit of graffiti but is empty and boring. We spent about 30 minutes in here but the camera never came out the bag. Block B is the only one worth doing really IMO. The Explore Visited with Brewtal and Prettyvacant71. A morning adventure that went without too many hiccups. We nipped into Block C first but quickly realised it wasn't very interested and elected to go to Block B instead as I'd heard it was the 'best' bit. Its got some fantastic decay but isn't totally trashed or smashed up. It's got a some nice original features still remaining. You could see where they had cleared some of the pigeon droppings using large sheets, but there was still enough in certain parts to warrant breaking out the dust mask for a less pleasant areas. A nice explore and a good end to a busy year of exploring. Hopefully 2018 brings more great explores! Photos
  14. After a long drive stuck on the glorious M25 for hours on end, the Grove air raid shelters were nearby so took my chance for a quick solo mooch. I have to be honest, these have been on my list for quite some time but wondering around the tunnels the place became somewhat repetitive so I did not walk as far down the shelters as I could as they felt almost endless. None the less, it was great to finally see the shelter and a nice surprise to see graffiti at a minimum, despite nothing other than broken chairs, rusty buckets and a lot of spiders within the shelter.
  15. This place has been on the radar for a while now but never got the chance to properly take a look. The dome itself can be seen for quite a few miles across the surrounding areas. Not a great deal of information available other than it looks like some sort of water treatment site/reservoir possibly used by the MOD, given the land its situated on. It doesn't appear to be fully derelict either as you can still here the sound of running water and the grass seems to be trimmed. The explore went as planned, few dog walkers here and there, other than that spent a little while looking around.
  16. The small chapel is idyllically situated on the hillside. Standing at the foot of the hill, the building is almost invisble. Thanks to the season, the knowing eye is able to spot the chapel between the sparse vegetation. Following up the slope for few minutes, a small weather-beaten wall appears. Climibing up the wall, there´s a small, overgrown path to follow. Inside the chapel it´s silent. Peaceful. The roof is full of holes - traces of the ravages of time. Ivy climbs steadily through the biggest of them. There´s still a large crucifix on the wall. The detailed depiction of Jesus is still in an unbelievable excellent condition. While Jesus looks as good as new, everything around him is decaying relentlessly. Unfortunately, I hardly have any information about the chapel. Old commemorative plaques testify that the chapel was probably errected by a local noble family. The building should be far more than 100 years old by now.
  17. This building used to be a monastery but in the first World War it was turned into an emergency hospital for soldiers who fought in the trenches. Many Belgian soldiers were brought into care here, which explains why the ' don't spit on the floor" sign is both in French and English. We came here on a chilly winters day in December. I loved how the warm sunlight supported the nice colours in the building. It's also the first location in which i stripped down to take a selfie, to find out later on, loads of other explorers had been there on the same day. this could had turned out very awkward 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Thanks for watching.
  18. Not much to say about this one ,It was a Ragstone mine for building stone, probably 19th century,there has been much rumour of tunnels under this area and not much actual information ,seems it was opened up many years ago and surveyed after it had been sealed up in the 1960's,some evidence of later visits are visable but other than that it seems to have been forgotton about and became more rumour than fact in later years! Props to Obs for finding a way into this one
  19. While doing a bit of research I found a couple of good leads. This was the first one I followed up. Rolling solo an early start got me here in full darkness. As I was going in with no info and didnt really want a wasted three hour drive. Quite a bit of cctv around but I worked out a reasonable route through the grounds and luckily it worked out all good. The Crescent was designed by John Carr and built in the late 18th century Funded by the Fifth Duke Of Devonshire as the centre piece for his spa Scheme. Originally two hotels one closed early in the 20th century and became council offices and library closed in 1992. The St Anns hotel closed in 1992 and has been empty since. Anyway on with some photos. Luckily most of it is lit inside so I was shooting straight away. 1 2 Shame the stairs are covered I think they could of been rather nice. 3 4 So I had kind of forgotten what had drawn me to this building. It was seeming a bit stripped inside. Then I was reminded as I walked through the doors at the top of the round staircase. 5 6 7 8 9 10 A couple more bits were worth shooting 11 So it turns out there was more than I expected here... Right next door is or was a natural water spring the current builing was built in 1853 and was altered in the 1920s. The pump room was last used in the 1970's. Some of the building was used as the tourist information Centre. 12 13 14 15 Who needs the jungle school when you can have a jungle pool. 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Thanks for looking I hope you enjoyed.
  20. History : St John's was built between 1890 and 1892 to a design by the Lancaster architects Paley, Austin and Paley. The estimated cost of the church was £6,800 but, because of problems with the foundations, its final cost, including the fittings, was nearer to £12,000 (£1,170,000 in 2015). It provided seating for 616 people.Financial donations towards the site and structure of the church were made by Thomas Brooks, 1st Baron Crawshaw of Crawshaw Hall. Because of diminishing numbers attending the church, and because of thefts of lead from the roof of the church, the congregation has decided to opt for the church to be declared redundant. The church was declared redundant on 20 February 2012. Warning, pic heavy. Outside Alter A few statues Nice curtains I've no idea what this is called Had a bit of fun inside.. Finally..
  21. Not much history other than it shut down back in the 1980's at some point.. Had fun in here very thankful I had someone with me who's been a few times before (none member). Had a blast working our way around all the paths and climbing under and over cave ins.. Love my first underground explore.. Took over 300 pictures.. Only ones I have edited.. Enjoy. Rare Sight
  22. So 2014 ended rather well exploring wise for me. Last day exploring of the year and I cracked this, the fails later didn't really matter History blatantly stolen from Wikipedia: The Grand Hotel is a Grade ii listed hotel in the city centre of Birmingham. The hotel occupies the greater part of a block bounded by Colmore Row, Church Street, Barwick Street and Livery Street and overlooks the cathederal and churchyard. Designed by architect Thomson Plevins, construction began in 1875 and the hotel opened in 1879. Extensions and extensive interior renovations were undertaken by prominent Birmingham architecture firm Martin and Chamberlain from 1890 to 1895. Interior renovations included the building of the Grosvenor Room which boasts rich and impressive Louis XIV style decoration. I had come up with a couple of rather nice leads one you may of already seen on here a few weeks ago. I felt that my luck was in so I gave this lil beauty a shot. 3 am on my own I took the long drive to Birmingham. Upon arrival I wandered round and realised this was certainly no walk in!! Eventualy I was in unsure if I had full access as the heating was still on I went for a wander. I couldn't believe it I was in!! 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. I am wandering around and for the life of me can't find what I came for, stripped room after stripped room. I take a seat on the stairs I need some help. Who else to ask but Google. I work out where the room is only to find padlocks and boarded up doorways. Eventually going up and down stairs I reach my goal. I give you the Grosvenor Room. 7. The problems not over yet. This is a tiny balcony and I am unsure on the strenght of the metal decoration. I have another wander and have no luck on finding any access. Heading back to the balcony I find some rope. I tie a few hoops into it and tie it to the balcony. Finally I am on the floor and I can enjoy this stunning room properly. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18.
  23. Abandoned Orphanage Visited with: Venustas, Rusty, Martin, PG_UE & Carl Visit Date: December 2014 Please Note: Entry is always through an open access point and not by forcing our way in….. We are explorers, not vandals. My Visit This was our second location of the day and we was all hoping we would have better luck than we did at the first location which was sealed up tight, so as we always do we left and headed off to to the next location. After a few hours drive we pulled into a car park not far from the location and to our surprise we spotted another small group of explorers with all their kit ready to go. I knew who one of the smaller group was straight away it was Dirty Jigsaw, we pulled up alongside them and said hello. After parking the cars we headed back over to the group so we could introduce ourselves properly, Holly Sunshine was another of the group and her partner, then a few minutes later Holly’s friend arrived. It turned out that they was also heading to to the same place. It is always a risk being in such a large group as it is easier to get spotted but we decided to take the gamble. We decided to use the woods for cover due to the size of the group and as much as that helped us out it also helped us get a little lost! We did take a couple of wrong turns but our phone GPS helped us out and pointed us back in the right direction. After about 45 minutes we emerged from the woods and could see the location straight ahead. One nasty metal fence and 5 minutes later we was all safely inside unpacking our camera gear. The main issue we was going to face with so many of us in one place was trying not to get in each others way which indeed did happen a few times and made it a little slower to get the photos we wanted, however, we managed and it was great to finally see this place and to meet DJ, Holly and the rest…. I hope you enjoy my photos…. The main hall stairs are still in very good condition as you will see on the photos, however the rest of the building is not doing so good. This shot was taken from the top of the stairs. Before heading off to look around the rest of the building I took a couple of photos of the main entrance. When I have seen reports from here by other explorers I always thought that the stairs would be my favourite area, however, that is not the case and I found myself fascinated by the following room. I just had to get a shot of the skylight! Cool right? Hell yes it is! A big room with lots going on, nice airy windows, nice décor, awesome skylight, wood, stonework... What more could we ask for? Here is another room that I really liked. Finally, for anyone who has seen reports on this place before will be fully aware that this location still has electricity, also you will know of the following two rooms. I found it hard to get a good shot in these rooms for some reason and almost left these shots out of the report. More images available on flickr The images above are just a small selection of the images I have edited. I will be adding lots more photos from photos on my Flickr page which can be found here, https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Final thoughts It was great to tick this one off the list which made the long drive and even longer day worthwhile. The building is deteriorating quickly and I have not seen any information for future plans of this building. The future is definitely not looking good…… Fingers crossed this changes and a new lease of life can be found before it is too late. Thanks for reading, Dugie
  24. This was originally an invite kindly offered by Mr Jobs for me and the wife,the wife had to decline due to ill health so i jumped at the chance of 3 days under paris with a bunch of strange chaps in waders. Was picked up by Maniac along with non member Mr perry to then head to dover to meet Bigjobs,Paradox,Fb,James and amy and then head out on the 2.15 ferry! Bit of car trouble and a sleep later we are all on our way into Paris to find our entry point. Once inside i have to say it was pretty full on with the pace and we spent the majority of the time on the march from one area to the next and from what i can gather we did some milage from the very north to the furthest south of this section with many stop off's in-between,i didnt have chance to grab as many pictures as i wanted to due to the camera being buried under the kit i took and for not wanting to hold the rest of the group up constantly setting up shots,and to be fair there is no real way to get my gear out safely when your ball deep in water. Really enjoyed this trip and the party nye was a great end to the night with some really decent people. Enough waffle and on with the pictures that i did manage to get..Just a final massive thanks to all concerned ,it was a great trip and one i wont forget in a hurry Pics in no particular order.. People with maps who know where im going.. Pic heavy alert And my favourite picture Thanks to all involved couldn't have imagined a more decent a way to spent NYE..
  25. Intro Maybe not worth a full report as it's very empty and it smelt quite bad... Still, I'll post this here with a bit of history. The place was once quite big and most buildings still remain including this one. The big three main front white buildings are in use at the bottom floor but the rest is empty as far as I can see. The grounds are in use by lorries vans and we didn't check any of the other buildings as it was getting dark and I think security for the live sections was catching on. The other buildings are apparently in use as self storage and other retail units. The place could do with some research in case there is more to be seen (which there probably is) and in that case if I can help with you research at all give us a shout. History Bata Shoes was founded in 1894 by Tomáš BaÅ¥a in ZlÃ*n (then Austro-Hungarian Empire, today the Czech Republic). After the plea of a Tilbury clergyman to alleviate unemployment during the Great Depression and in part to overcome customs tariffs on foreign products, construction began in 1932 on the Bata shoe factory in East Tilbury.[5] For the remaining years of the 20th century, the factory was an economic force in the Tilbury area and provided a unique model of a Company town in Britain complete with worker housing, schools and entertainment. In 1933 the first "Bata houses" for workers were built, set among gardens in a chequerboard pattern, which were distinct from the more typical Victorian terraced housing in the area.[4] The factory's architecture "predates" and "perhaps eclipses" other British examples of modernist architecture such as Highpoint I or the Isokon building, according to The Guardian. Built of welded steel columns, roof trusses and reinforced concrete walls, the estate's buildings were quite atypical of other red-bricked and sloped-roofed London suburbs. All the social needs of the workforce were met by the factory,[7] and "Bata-ville" had all the services of a normal town, including a theatre, sports facilities, hotel, restaurant, grocery and butcher shops, post office, and its own newspaper. The German occupation of Czechoslovakia in 1938 caused turmoil for Bata Shoes generally but the factory in East Tilbury thrived and "British Bata" was born. As male factory workers were called to arms, their wives often took over their jobs. While in the armed forces, employees received the company newspaper, the Bata Record, along with food and cigarette parcels. At least 81 Bata employees from the Tilbury factory died in the war. After the war, Bata's home office and other facilities throughout eastern Europe were nationalised by communist regimes. The Bata factory in East Tilbury remained in steady use for over 70 years, but production was gradually shifted to facilities closer to its export markets in the 1960s.[5] Factory downsizing began in the 1980s and the Bata industrial estate came to a close in 2005. The East Tilbury (Bata) Conservation Area was designated in 1993 by Thurrock Council and includes a Grade II listed building. The factory inspired the documentary film Bata-ville: We Are Not Afraid of the Future. The Bata Reminiscence and Resource Centre at East Tilbury Library were set up to collect the memories of people who lived and worked within the British Bata community. In June 2011, an interactive trail was launched as an iPhone app known as Thurrock Mobile Explorer. This describes a route around the Bata estate and provides information about the history as well as environment at numbered points. My visit Rest of the site has it's own security and is surrounded by a perimeter fence, we just walked through the front gate. We doubted anyone would query it and we were right. This worked out better than scaling palisade... Wandered about the site for 10 mins before seeing this and jumping in for another 5 mins. Heard footsteps etc. and eventually got out and walked straight out the front gates again. Pictures Only took a few with the fisheye, 2 are very underexposed so excuse the poor editing on them. Cheers
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