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Found 4 results

  1. Built in 1958 there has been no one swimming in this pool for years. #1 DSC03099-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #2 DSC03104-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #3 DSC03100-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #4 DSC03101-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #5 DSC03102-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr #6 DSC03106-Bearbeitet-Bearbeitet by Ghost-Scooter, auf Flickr
  2. Haus der Offiezere My first report. I have had this account for about a year but never posted anything from fear of my photos not being good enough to post. Decided to pluck up the courage to start contributing more but I apologise if there are any mistakes. Anyway, on to the history! History The Haus der Offiezere was originally established as a shooting range between Kummersdorf and Jüterbog in 1888. It wasn't until 1910, when construction of the Berlin to Dresden railway line took place, it was decided that due to it's location, Wunsdorf held a significant strategic advantage for the German forces. Because of this it became a military headquarters two years following. A telephone and telegraph office was built in 1912. By the start of the first world war, Wunsdorf had already become Europe's largest defence base, boasting 60,000 acres of land. A year later, the first mosque built in Germany was founded on this site. This was to accommodate for the Muslim POW's (prisoners of war) that were being held in the facility. They were known as the Halbmondlager or Crescent Moon camp. Once the First World War had come to an end, the Wunsdorf Headquarters was converted into a military sports school a year later in 1919. It was even used to train athletes for the Olympic games in Berlin in 1936. During the uprising of the Third Reich, a network of highly modernised tunnels and bunkers were built, including a communications centre, known as the Zeppelin. A year Maybach I and II were built which coincided with the Zeppelin bunker. A ring tunnel connected all the bunkers to each other and were disguised as ordinary homes on the ground, to avoid suspicion from spies within the allied forces. The construction of these bunkers weren't completed until 1940, a year after war was declared in Europe. From 1943 the Haus der Offiezere was temporarily converted into a hospital to treat wounded German soldiers. Two years later, in 1945 the Red Army had invaded East Germany and quickly seized control of Wunsdorf. This was when it was renamed the Haus der Offiezere which translates to House of the Officer. During Soviet occupation of Wunsdorf in the GDR, the Haus der Offiezere became a place of art and culture. The former sports halls and gymnasiums were torn down and replaced with elaborate theatres and concert halls. Daily deliveries of supplies came all the way from Moscow on a direct train line and the locals nicknamed it 'little Moscow' due to the number of roughly 60,000 Russian inhabitants. This continued for almost 50 years, until the reunification of Germany in 1990 when it was handed back to the state. The last remaining Russians eventually left in 1994 and it has remained unoccupied since. Visit The photos I have compiled for this post were taken on two separate occasions. Wanted to give a good representation of the location, as there is a lot to see. Unfortunately some of my photographs were taken when I first started getting into the hobby, so I hope they do enough justice and excuse the quality of said images. Second visit was on a solo trip to Germany, giving me plenty of time to explore and document this location. I hope you enjoy my report! Externals Internals If you've got this far, thanks for reading!
  3. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: and 2 black and whites. 6: 7: Yes a legit location, pay to enter but we were happy we did it. Lovely buildings a lot to see. Very nice caretaker. Yeah a fun visit. Hop you like the photo's! grts, Peter
  4. Ok, something a little different this time.. No house, church, industrial site or other typical urbex location, but one of those mean machines.. This old bucket wheel excavator was built in 1964 and once belonged to the biggest machines on the planet. It was used till 2003 and then moved to it's current location / it's final resting place... Here some details: Year: 1964/65, Total length: 171.5 m Highest point: 50 m Total weight: 3850 t Diameter bucket wheel: 12500 mm Amount of buckets: 11 Capacity of single bucket: 1500 dm� Maximum digging height: 35 m Maximum digging depth -15m Here 2 images of when it was still in use: Ok, then now on with the pic's.. Just to show how big this thing is: (That's me, next to the arrow..) 1# (And a close-up) 2# Ok, on with the pic: 3# 4# 5# 6# 7# 8# 9# 10# 11# 12# 13# 14# 15# 16# 17# Thanks for watching!! A few more on Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/urbexosaurus/sets/72157633783544150/
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