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Found 8 results

  1. History The engineering company J.E. Billups of Cardiff who also constructed Mireystock Bridge and the masonry work on the Lydbrook viaduct commenced construction of the tunnel in 1872 using forest stone. The tunnel is 221 metres in length and took 2 years to construct. The tunnel allowed the connection of the Severn and Wye Valley railway running from Lydney with the Ross and Monmouth network at Lydbrook. The first mineral train passed through the tunnel on 16 August 1874. Passenger services commenced in September 1875 pulled by the engine Robin Hood. The history of this section of line is not without incident - a railway ganger was killed in the tunnel by a train in 1893 and a locomotive was derailed by a fallen block of stone in the cutting at the northern entrance in 1898. The line officially closed to passenger trains in July 1929 but goods trains continued to use the line until the closure of Arthur & Edward Colliery at Waterloo in 1959 and Cannop Colliery in 1960. Lifting of the track was completed in 1962. The tunnel and cutting were buried with spoil in the early 1970's. Thanks to the vision and enthusiasm of a group of local Forest railway enthusiasts assisted by Forest Enterprise the top of the northern portal of the tunnel (with its unusual elliptical shape) which has lain buried for 30 years has now been exposed. As of 2018 the tunnel now still lays abandoned with no sign of the cycle track and the £50,000 funding seemingly gone to waste. Pics Thanks for looking
  2. A lot of abandoned trains sleeping at the entrance of a huge forest.
  3. The Hotel closed in January 2015 due to running at a loss and bad reviews. It has since been sold onto a retirement home developer. Not an amazing explore but the bathroom was cleaner then most peoples and even has running water and a flushing toilet! Below is a few bits of information about the hotel: Inside New Forest National Park and a 2-minute walk from bike rentals, this old-school hotel is in a sprawling Victorian-style building on 5 acres. It's a 3-minute walk from multiple shopping and dining options on High Street. This 3-star hotel is situated between Southampton and Bournemouth. The hotel has 59 individually decorated bedrooms, all en-suite, in a choice of standard or premier room. Each room comes with a number of facilities to make guest's stay as comfortable as possible. Closure: http://www.dailyecho.co.uk/news/11607497.Shock_over_hotel_closure_announcement/ Thank You!
  4. Again a chance finding. I searched the satellite images from Google Earth and I saw a house in the woods. The location was ideal for an abandoned place and so I went there to check it out. It could also be a hunting lodge or a bothy, but I was lucky. Lying around letters revealed that it wasn't (as one might expect) a holiday home, but a "normal" house. And, although there was no road, only a forest path. But the local government forbade the right to live there in 2001, because the house was not connected to the sewer system. Since the house is abandoned. My first visit was in early 2012. The photos are from a re-visit in 2013. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
  5. This nursing home (located in a forest and built on the foundations of an estate from the 18th century) was closed in 2001. 2013 burnt down a part of the attic. My first visit here was 2008. The photos are from 2011 (part one) and 2012 (part two). part one 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
  6. Going back a couple of years now, i dusted the mountain bike off, topped myself up with Jack3d and headed to Harewood Forest! I covered some mileage over the day but killing two birds with one stone ensured i had a thoroughly enjoyable day but hitting the deck after mis-judging a tree root wasn't a highlight - blood was drawn but chicks dig scars though, right? Anywho, the history? Basically the RAF required a stretch of woodland not too close to a town, that was rail served and about 25 miles inland to store ammunition. New sidings and a branch network for military traffic were built at the Longparish station in 1942 and concrete roads were built in the forest and to effectively disperse ammunition to the storage huts. Bombs started arriving in the autumn of 1943 and the depot initially stored 40,000 tons which obviously increased around D-Day. Alas and onto the pictures: A once lovely Ford Prefect, slowly rusting away. Water tower Concrete roads were laid down to disperse ammunition to the storage huts The nissen huts were utilised for a far different reason 70 years ago Emergency Water Supply (EWS) - many of these are dotted throughout the forest This is Middleton House, it was a school but taken over and used as a HQ Maintenance Unit 202 This picture was actually with my father when we went in car, it wasn't there when i re-visited on my own. I'll leave it there, thanks for looking!
  7. Didn't have this on the list for this trip but as we where passing on route back to the Port the guys said did i wanna have a quick look!Well after seeing so many pics from this place over the last year or so i was expecting nicer things,seems the smash and burn brigade along with the pikeys have really hit this place hard,didnt get the tripod out so took a handful of handheld shots of the less damaged bits Visited with SpaceInvader and Sx-riffraff relatively UN-smashed room all in all pretty trashed!
  8. Awesome explore all round. Infiltration much? Had a couple of very close calls haha. Nottingham Forest play their home games at The City Ground, which has been their home, directly across the Trent from city rivals, Notts County, since 1898. Before they settled at The City Ground, which is located on the south bank of the Trent, they played at the Forest Recreation Ground, from which the team takes its name. The City Ground, Home of Nottingham Forest The four stands are: The Main Stand, the oldest stand in the ground. Capacity: 5,708. There were plans to rebuild this stand with a much larger capacity in order to raise the City Ground's capacity to 40,000 if the club regains a Premier League place. This was scrapped when the club planned to build a new stadium. The Trent End, the newest stand, built in 1994. Capacity: 7,500 The Bridgford End, the lower tier houses up to 5,151 away fans, while its total capacity is 7,710 The Brian Clough Stand, which was originally named the Executive Stand but has been renamed to honour Forest's former manager Brian Clough. It is the largest stand in the ground with a capacity of 10,000. The Capital One Corner, located in one corner of the ground between the Brian Clough and Bridgford stands. Before it was named Pinnacle Place, after the club's previous sponsors. The main noise comes from Capital One Corner and the Main Stand's "A" block The ground's combined capacity is 30,602. Right, on with the photos (theres quite a lot of them actually) Hope you like:) Shadow
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