Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'funerary'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • General Discussion & Forum information
    • Forum information
    • Just take a moment & say Hi
    • General Discussion
  • Exploration Forums
    • Military Sites
    • Industrial Locations
    • Hospitals & Asylums
    • Public buildings, Education & Leisure
    • Underground Explores
    • High Places
    • Manors, Mansions & Residential
    • Religious Sites
    • Anything Else
  • Other Forums
    • Video Reports
    • Short Reports
    • Themed Threads

Categories

  • About the Forum
  • Urban Exploring information
  • Photography and camera advice
  • Technical Help

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website URL


Location


Interests

Found 1 result

  1. The chapel, with ten-part rose windows, was intended simply as a funerary chapel, not a place of worship, and intended to be non-denominational. The floor plan is in the shape of a cross and the main entrance was covered for access by horse-drawn funeral carriages. Winding wooden staircases in the twin turrets gave access to the public gallery above. The octagonal steeple stands at 120 feet (36,5 meters) and was the tallest in the district when it was built in 1840. The architect was William Hosking, better known as a civil engineer; this (and the main cemetery entrance) remain the only surviving examples of his architectural work. The chapel is also the oldest surviving non-denominational funerary chapel in Europe. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
×