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Found 15 results

  1. History After the beginning of the 1860s gas was widely used as a means of lighting So the first gas works of Eisenach were put into operation on 1 October 1862. However, the line capacity was no longer sufficient soon, because the gas consumption had quadrupled from 1888 to 1912. Therefore, the construction of the new gas works began in 1898, and the old gas works were shut down in 1899. The new gas works had its own rail connection for coal transport. In 1901, already more than 1.5 million m³ of city gas were produced. In 1912 there were a total of 938 public gas lanterns in Eisenach. The street lighting cost 46600 marks per year, equivalent to 1.20 marks per inhabitant. In 1912, 150 gas lanterns were remotely ignited and extinguished from the factory. This saved considerable costs for lantern guards. 300 street lamps were still under construction. In 1982, the gas plant's technical facilities were worn out and barely usable efficiently. For this reason, the gas plant was shut down. Until 1990, the area was still used as a transfer station for coal trains. After that, the buildings were abandoned, since then, they disintegrate. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
  2. First Post Guys! Anyways, my group of friends and I found an abandoned Gas Station south of Atlanta. Apparently, the gas station went bankrupt due to the county screwing them over. A new highway system was out in, and the road to the gas station was relocated, so in order to get to the station, one would have to travel a good 5 minutes out of their way. Not worth it. So the station closed down and now it looks like this. May go back to take more pictures soon, stay posted. Have a great day guys, and be safe!
  3. How to post a report using Flickr Flickr seems to change every time the wind changes direction so here's a quick guide on how to use it to post a report... Step 1 - Explore and take pictures Step 2 - Upload your chosen pictures to Flickr like this.. Step 3 - Once your images are successfully uploaded to flickr choose a category for the location that you have visited... Step 4 - Then "Start New Topic".. You will then see this screen... Step 5 - Now you are ready to add the image "links", known as "BBcodes", which allow your images to display correctly on forums.. Step 6 - Then click "select" followed by "view on photo page".. Now select "Share" shown below.. Step 7-13 - You will then see this screen... Just repeat those steps for each image until you're happy with your report and click "submit topic"! You can edit your report for 24 hours after posting to correct errors. If you notice a mistake outside of this window contact a moderator and they will happily rectify the problem for you
  4. I've been waiting a long time to finally climb this. Not sure what took me so long, but I finally did it recently. It's hard to find out much about this history of this one. All I know is this is gas holder number 3 (The spiral one that remains is gas holder No 4) and it was constructed sometime in the 1930's by the Rochester, Chatham and Gillingham Gas Company, which were known previously as The Rochester and Chatham Gas Light Company, formed in 1818. I know it was in use up until the late 2000's as I used to drive past it every day and saw it at is various different heights as the gas volume inside changed. It is however now dormant, its function being replaced by the new high pressure gas storage facility that's been built next door. This thing is a right royal pain to get to. There's 3 high palisade fences (Yes you heard me right, 3 fences) and an anticlimb grill on the staircase. They really don't want you to climb this thing, so climb it we did. Explored with new explorer marmiteonpizza from another forum. From the bottom Staircase From the top Modern high pressure gas storage You can see the remaining holder No 4 here No gas holder climb is complete without a selfie Close up Thanks for looking Maniac
  5. Morning all, After seeing a report report on this place, and with a day off coming up, i decided i wanted to have a look at this place and climb the gas holder and take some photos in the centre one where the canopy has collapsed and now seats some still water for some reflections. Some history although its quite hard to find The largest of the three has been at the site for around 45-50 years, with the second largest having been built around 40 years ago, along with the smallest of the three. All three of the holders are inactive and have been for well over a decade. The site is owned by Southern Gas Networks. Sp, off i went not knowing any real details other than just looking at google maps and planning a route i would take, boy was that wrong, ended up by a little stream with no way over. I made a call to someone who has visited before and he led me in the right direction. When i got to access point, it was no means easy, esp as i was on my own, but got in with no real problems. Once you are up next to these things, you realise just who big they are. I made my way to the furthest one and made my way up. The stairs being gated off, and the walkway that links 2 of them together also, so you have to climb outside of it to get across. So i made it to the middle one and as it was daylight manaaged to take shots without my tripod which is a nice change. I then made my way up the ladders, i only got to halfway before deciding not to go any further as 1) the ladders were abit wobbly tbh and 2) i was on my own. Anyway, hope you enjoy my photos kr And the last shot i took on the day Thanks for looking DJ
  6. History ​ Motspur Park, also known locally as West Barnes is a suburb in south-west London in the boroughs of Royal Borough of Kingston upon Thames and London Borough of Merton. It owes its identity to the railway station of the same name, which has six trains an hour to London’s Waterloo, and to the adjacent parade of small shops. Two prominent gas holders, which are used to store the consumer gas supply for south west London stand just south of the shopping parade and can be seen from a wide area. The Explore ​ So the largest gas holder has caved in and made a kind of lake, it smells a bit gassy but its cool none-the-less. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Thanks for reading!
  7. Climbed with -Raz- 100% the most exhilarating climb we have ever done, with the cages on the ladders only going half way around the back of you to allow for the holder to rise up and then back down again, it really hit home the importance of keeping a tight hold considering the consequences... Bit of History/Background; Northern Gas Networks own the structure. It is the town’s one remaining gas holder and is maintained to ensure gas supplies never run short. The 127ft giant stores gas and helps meet the enormous peaks in demand that occur in winter. A spokesman said: “In winter there can be as much as five times the amount of gas flowing through the mains than in summer. When everyone wakes up in the morning or gets home from school or work, demand can be so high that we need to have some extra gas stored in case we need it. “That’s where the gas holders are so important. We fill them up overnight, when there’s gas to spare, and they empty during the day when demand is higher.†The holder was originally built in 1916 by W C Holmes and then rebuilt by Clayton & Co in 1968. It is column guided and holds nearly five million cubic feet of gas (or 127,000 cubic metres). There were originally five gas holders at Huddersfield, which have been demolished over the years as more gas becomes stored in underground pipelines. Gas production ceased in the town in the late 1960s. And here is a news report of 3 guys climbing it back in 2013; http://www.examiner.co.uk/news/west-yorkshire-news/huddersfield-gas-climb-stunt-condemned-6152832 The Explore; After a day of fails and alarms we were more determined than ever to get on and do something and having seen this on previous visits to the area we decided to mish over for a look. The surrounding area is pretty much derp city however the Kirklees Council appear to be very handy with that horrible metal sheeting which is nigh on impossible to get around without the help of an angle grinder, or perhaps a teleport. Upon reaching the Gas Holder we quickly established that this giant was not in her prime condition, and as the frame cracked and creaked around us, we began our ascent. What followed was the most terrifying and yet enjoyable climb of my life. The views of Huddersfield in the twilight were pretty cool, not anything spectacular but nice and chiller for a sunday night. Photos; I would like to call this particular image "Oh Fuck This Is High, Why Am I Doing This" Thanks for looking
  8. Hello all, Leeds from above in various locations, styles and quality thanks to Facebook Enjoy!! Thanks for looking
  9. Something a little bit different this time, been here a few times now and the view still takes my breathe away. Its great to have something like this so close to home and as an added bonus the security guard turned up just as we were leaving which saved us a climb The recent fire there hasn't really done much damage to the inside but there is nothing really worth seeing in there hence the lack of photos but please enjoy. Thanks guys !!!!!
  10. About 6 years ago myself and Frosty had a go at getting up this. We failed at the time, neither one of us was confident enough to try climbing over the gate half way up. Fast forward 6 years, I thought I'd have another crack at this while killing some time in Canterbury, then I revisited it again a I had camera issues the first time. This gas holder is different from most because it was enclosed and as a bonus you can get inside it at the moment as they've cut a whacking great hole in the side. I say was because the actual gas holder that would have been inside the massive structure is gone, they've removed it and the rest of the structure's days are numbered. Want to go and get the best view of Canterbury you'll ever see, go soon, like real soon. Also the acoustics in there are fantastic, I was like a kid in a toy shop making all kinds of noises just to hear the booming echo that just carried on and on and on. . . . Visited this twice, first time with extreme_ironing and the second time with a non-member, we'll call him 'A' Not many photos, there's only so many you can take of a gas holder! There it is! (They are stars, not dead pixels on my camera I promise) Best view of the Cathedral I think you'll ever see. Starry Starry night . . . . Compulsory selfie. Inside where they've stripped out the actual working parts Just because. Thanks for looking, Maniac.
  11. After sneaking in and reaching the top floor of the Opal Tower to find a locked hatch we headed over the road to the British gas building in leeds, after not having the luxury of a lift unlike the opal tower 14 floor's later we was greeted by a amazing view overlooking the city. The building itself has seen alot better days and is usually home to crackheads and arsonists. Thanks for looking
  12. according to wiki 21'st highest building in Leeds; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_tallest_buildings_and_structures_in_Leeds
  13. Originally, gas was only used for lighting for a few hours at the start and end of each day. Storing gas was the solution to make it over a longer period. The first gas holders were a “bell†floating in a tank of water. Calibration marks were used to show on the floating bell showed how much gas was being made or used. Later in the 19th century, gas holders became larger and telescopic sections were added. Waterless designs were introduced from Europe in the 20th century. Many gas holders remain in use today in Britain, being filled at night and emptied during the day in the winter. First gas pipes were generally made of iron, they are now made from polyethylene for higher pressures. There are two basic types of gasholder  rigid waterless and telescoping. Rigid waterless gas holders were a very early design which showed no sign of expansion or contraction. There are modern versions of the waterless gas holder, e.g. oil-sealed, grease-sealed and "dry seal" (membrane) types. Telescoping holders fall into two subcategories. The earlier of the telescoping variety were column guided variations and were built in Victorian times. To guide the telescoping walls, or "lifts", they have an external fixed frame, visible at a fixed height at all times. Spiral guided gasholders were built in the UK up until 1983. These have no frame and each lift is guided by the one below, rotating as it goes up as dictated by helical runners. Both telescoping types use the manometric property of water to provide a seal. The whole tank floats in a circular or annular water reservoir, held up by the roughly constant pressure of a varying volume of gas, the pressure determined by the weight of the structure, and the water providing the seal for the gas within the moving walls. Besides storing the gas, the tank's design serves to establish the pressure of the gas system. With telescoping (multiple lift) tanks, the innermost tank has a ~1 ft wide by 2 ft high lip around the outside of the bottom edge, called a cup, which picks up water as it rises above the reservoir water level. This immediately engages a downward lip on the inner rim of the next outer lift, called a grip, and as this grip sinks into the cup, it preserves the water seal as the inner tank continues to rise until the grip grounds on the cup, whereupon further injection of gas will start to raise that lift as well. Holders were built with as many as four or more lifts.
  14. Could be interesting ? http://europe-re.com/st-james-group-secures-deal-for-the-redevelopment-of-80-acre-southall-gas-works-site-uk/41886
  15. Go in over a dual carriage way back home the other day I spotted this building and a must explore just ate away at me all that day, so off I tootled back the day after to have a shufti !, no cctv big smashed open window and grass growing out of the roof ! reet nice sized building with a come in and explore look to it, over the gate n I'm off all guns blazing like a kid let loose in a sweet shop all over it like a bad rash of space mumps..... Some history on this place..... Elland-cum-Greetland Gas Company, Established on 6th May 1836. Managers have included Robert Dempster (1850) and James Bridge (1941). Robert Dempstar (1829-1913) Scot from Cupar, Fife. He worked as an engineer and manager of the Elland-cum-Greetland Gas Company from 1850. He was one of the first members of the British Association of Gas Managers and an associate member of the Institute of Civil Engineers. His consultancy work advising local textile manufacturers on the building and running of their own small gas plants led to the establishment of Dempster's in 1855, specialising in the production of gas retorts and gasholders at their Rosemount Iron Works, Elland. In 1877, he wrote a 32-line song entitled The Good Old Gas-Light Company. He was retired by 1881, but continued to buy or build gas works from his retirement home in Penmaenmawr. He married Elizabeth (1826-18??) also from Cupar and had 5 children. James Bridge (1877-1941) was an Engineer and Manager of the Elland-cum-Greetland Gas Company (1941) This is all the history of this bloke I could find. Tom Turner. (1863-192?) Of Victoria Street, West Vale, A short history ! On 31st January 1923, he and his wife, Annie (1867-1922), were found unconscious in their bed. They were found by the police who had been alerted when Mr Turner failed to show up for work,They died later in Royal Halifax Infirmary. It was suspected that the couple had left the gas on low, because Mr Turner was suffering from cold and bronchitis. During the night, the Elland Gas Company reduced gas pressure in the area, which would have been sufficient for a small light to go out. You don't expect this next shot in a run down building full of pots n pans catchin water coming in through the roof ! Some poor family has had is 'ard' ere going by kids toys left all over the place. I was highly motivated to do the 'Monty Python Sketch' of a naked bloke playing a piano but i wont post that pic ere as i might get booted for bad taste ! Some nice cast iron work. Well I made my way back out via the broken window and back to the footpath along side of this building and I just took my last shot when a 4wd came towards me with a big bloke saying have you seen anyone in the building, my reply had to be no as I didn't see anyone.......(but me haha), then he started yapping on about a silent alarm n went off unlocking the gate I had just volted and then I was off....done n dusted ......2 mins more in the building n i'd av had a nice game of hide n seek !.
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