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Found 4 results

  1. I was not really sure what to expect from this place. It turned out to be a huge industrial playground with loads to have a look at. The size of this spot is awesome and I could not have asked for a better place to give my wide angle lens it's first outing. The workshops where another nice section in here. Some nice old machinery left to see. I really enjoyable explore this one and having a wide angle with me was a great bonus. Visited with non member Paul. HISTORY Pilkingtons was founded in 1826 as a partnership between members of the Pilkington and Greenall families, based in St Helens, Lancashire. It was originally named Greenall and Pilkington up until 1849. On the departure from the partnership of the last Greenall in 1845, the firm became known as Pilkington Brothers. The Kirk Sandall site came into existence in the early 1920's when the firm looked to establish another site in the UK. Kirk Sandall was an ideal situation. Its excellent waterway and railway facilities were conveniently sited, especially since the Great Central Railway Company had doubled its line in the area. After 76 year producing glass, the factory finally closed its doors in 2008. Not much has changed since it closed, most of it has remained abandoned but some of the site is used by Trackwork for training and storage. . Thanks For Looking More pics on my Flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157684315511034/with/35460637944/
  2. Various explores with -Raz- and some non members History; Pilkington Glass was founded in St. Helens in 1826 and the Doncaster site opened in 1922. This site was well located due to the canal which runs along side the factory creating easy transport links on the great canal systems. The factory is situated in the town of Kirk Sandall, a town which pretty much grew to house the work force for the factory in years prior everyone having cars. A pub was built in the town and named in the sites honour “The Glassmaker”. The site was closed in 2008 and has since been an attraction for both metal fairies and Urbexers alike. Various Explores; The first thing you notice about this place is the entrance, possibly the best one I’ve experienced; very cramped and that’s all I’ll say on the matter. The building is well… HUGE, spanning over a 1000ft end to end it dwarfs most industrial derps and it is covered in a horrid red dust (doesn’t come out of car seats). If you have a head for heights there are various cranes to climb and raised walkways to have a walk along. On the lower levels Network Rail apprentices are trained to lay tracks so be aware if they are there. If you got this far, thanks for reading
  3. PILKINGTON GLASS, DONCASTER - APRIL 2015 History Pilkington Glass was established in St Helens, Merseyside in 1826. The Doncaster site was opened in 1922 at its canalside location in Kirk Sandall. Pilkingtons had a large workforce and the small village of Kirk Sandall grew to provide housing for the workers. There was even a pub nearby named "The Glassmaker" (now rebuilt and re-named "The Glasshouse"). The site eventually ceased production in 2008. The explore It was long overdue to visit this much trodden derp, so we pointed the car at one of South Yorkshire's finest. The mooch did not disappoint, there was the industrial history brought to us on a massive scale, BUT WAIT!... as life long enthusiasts of creosote we were transported to a better world. All around us stood thousands of railway sleepers oozing their heady aroma, made stronger by the spring sunshine - magic . Anyway, on with the report! Explored with Hamtagger. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. HT's tripod sporting her legs. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Hamtagger has overdosed on the creosote... oh well nice knowing you bud . 13. I was amused by the ladder hanging from the ceiling. 14. 15. The whole factory was covered in these delightful hand painted signs (left). 16. Tracks, both narrow gauge and standard gauge can be seen disappearing underneath the toilet block left. 17. On to the store room, which did not disappoint. 18. 19. Thanks for looking
  4. A group of us went up north to have a got at this one last year, was taken aback by the sheer size of the place! We hit the main part of the factory just as the sun was setting and it made for some amazing lighting. Here's some history i found on the place but i really can remember where so apologies for no credits: Thanks for reading More Photos and full report on my blog -> http://www.ukurbex.co.uk/pilkington-glass-factory-doncaster/
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