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  1. This was a full fun visit and a lovely tricky one to get in to. History Brogyntyn Hall was constructed in 1975. It was a residence of members of the princely dynasty of the Welsh kingdom of Powys and one of the houses of the gentry in late medieval Wales. It subsequently came into the possession of the Ormsby-Gore family, Lord Harlech. Unfortunately a string of tragedies including two Lords Harlech dying without wills, leaving massive death duties to be paid, saw the decline of the family fortunes and subsequent sale of the Hall. Interestingly it was also used during the war by British Telecom as headquarters for communications for the spy network operating in Europe.
  2. The present chateau style house, the third on the site, was built for the Hughes copper mining family. The house, designed in the 1870s, was called a 'calendar house' as it had 365 rooms. It is set in walled gardens of around 18 acres, which are themselves set in grounds of around 5,000 acres, encompassing open fields, parkland and forests. The 1870s structure is an example of the myriad of new types of buildings that were arising during the Victorian era to fulfil increasingly specialised functions. For example, there was a room in the mansion that was only to be used for the ironing of newspapers, so that the ink would not come off on the reader's hands. The property was last used as a private home in 1929, after which it was converted to a 'rheuma spa', a health centre for the treatment of people with rheumatism. The spa remained until the outbreak of World War II, when the hall was taken over as a hospital. Post-war the hall became Clarendon Girls' School, but after extensive fire damage in 1975, the school was forced to close. Restored by businessman Eddie Vince as a Christian conference centre, it was sold at auction in 2001, but a proposed redevelopment by Derbyshire Investments failed to materialise. The property was to be offered for sale by auction on 12 October 2011 with a reserve price of £1.5million which did not include the 5,000 acres of surrounding land. However it was bought shortly before auction by a businessman who bid closest to the £1.5m guide price. He intended to develop the property into a hotel, but these plans never materialised, and the property lies derelict. In 2015 Kinmel Hall was identified by the Victorian Society as one of the top ten at-risk Victorian and Edwardian buildings. This has popped up a few times over the last few years and amazingly nothing much has changed since the last report in 2016. I failed here a couple of years back so it was time for round 2 with @Andy& @Miss.Anthrope. We don't take Ls baby! Renovation work appears to be taking place so there are definitely people working here during the week. The ground floor is where all the good stuff is at. Upstairs everything is pretty much stripped and empty. Anyway, I'm glad to have finally made it in here. Definitely one of the best mansions in the UK. Cheers for looking
  3. Grand casino history Located in the Sefton district of Southport at the corner of Lord Street and Court Street. Originally built in 1923 as a garage and car showroom, it was converted into a luxury cinema in 1938 by architect George E. Tonge. The Grand Cinema opened on 14th November 1938 with Arthur Tracy in "Follow Your Star". The cinema was designed for and operated by an independent operator throughout its cinematic life. Seating was provided in a stadium plan with a sloping floor at the front (known as the Pit stalls and stepped floor at the rear which was known as the Royal stalls and Grand stalls. An unusual feature was the provision of a balconette which was attached to each sidewall. Seating was provised in pairs all along towards the proscenium. There were decorative grilles each side of the proscenium opening which contained the organ pipes of the Compton 3Manual organ which had an illuminated console on a lift, in the centre of the orchestra pit. The organ was opened by Herbert A. Dowson. In the ceiling was a large shallow dowm which had a central Art Deco style light fixture. There was a cafe provided for patrons. In 1963 the Compton organ was removed to Cheetham Hill Methodist Church in Manchester, which in later years was moved to Chorley Town Hall. In 1966 another Compton organ was installed at the Grand Cinema which had previously been housed in the Regal Cinema, Douglas, Isle of Man and this was opened by Charles Smart. The Grand Cinema closed on 2nd July 1966 with Sean Connery in "Thunderball" and Peter Cushing in "Hound of the Baskervilles". It was converted into an independent bingo club, and the Compton organ was played to bingo players at the interval during the first few years. The Grand Cinema last operated as the Stanley Grand Casino, and from 2007 became the Mint Casino, but this was closed by May 2016 and the building is boarded up in early-2017. It is a Grade II listed building. Visited with @albinojay and @GK_WAX a nice easy no bother place this one to trouble or drama. With nice easy local parking. The place is a bit of a death trap with soggy weetabix floors. But enjoyed it was met there by another couple lads @cloth head @scrappy and another lad who's name I didn't get.nice to meet you all. This has been around a while but hasn't had much foot traffic previous post have been in non public so I'll post here. Move if appropriate thanks. AE3A3F7D-13D6-46A2-BBAC-531556536576 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 677196FF-ED07-414A-9EB3-16F7F1686508 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr A4BEE354-17D4-43C3-B29B-E949AD22EA21 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 521170FE-A826-4E2B-AE07-F90EB2A17446 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 41F04130-2574-41F5-BAD8-C6637C8C1DBA by Lavino lavino, on Flickr C5221223-E490-4DDB-9B64-EB5D1A80F0A0 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr A24A62DC-B8F2-4029-A979-D553F1A5F329 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 97FA0434-1D1C-44A2-96E0-89E2C6D61EC6 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 352BF5D7-B9D9-4E71-861F-CA6B8AADC650 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 95CC590A-7E8B-4876-A259-F6DCD85E1E93 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 5857917C-0368-421B-AF97-4E56B351376E by Lavino lavino, on Flickr F8D01375-12B7-4DD2-AF23-E36E812755EA by Lavino lavino, on Flickr CD2C385D-4775-4085-BCAC-E9347EE31B4E by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 97ABFA19-6F4F-488A-9F00-9636FFF07634 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr url=https://flic.kr/p/GcMZPQ][/url]ADBDC4A5-0609-4DF9-9D88-135775D61C59 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr B34CB251-D300-48EA-B24C-14806915C219 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 78899088-C91D-41E8-ADBE-8B4D02F6E0E6 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr url=https://flic.kr/p/23fMZKj][/url]7C7E01B6-72B6-4394-A664-A2188F5B5DBB by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 48BCACC7-F497-4402-911D-BC6A68F8C329 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 10E00DAC-5129-442C-A055-D8E8E6A46B37 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr A57EDCE2-17AF-4066-AEBF-742B3DFB10C6 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 9419402C-5E4F-45DA-BF5D-5706D72749B3 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 6ACB5984-5895-43ED-82E3-132DE586AC2F by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 324F8383-0F17-4D00-AB82-60CE78F340C2 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr FF2CBFFB-2962-498A-BEE4-2DE4AB3EB6D8 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 0FF552D4-1564-48DE-8E48-EFA706588646 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  4. Bretton Hall Gymnasium The history A teacher training college founded by Alec Clegg. The collage boasted in the design and the architecture of the veroius 'new' buildings scattered around the collage campus including the Gymnasium and the student centre. The collage merged with the University of Leeds in August 2001. Most of the music, fine art and teacher training courses were moved to the Leeds campus, but visual and performing arts education and creative writing remained at the Bretton site, which became home to the University's School of Performance and Cultural Industries. The Gymnasium also stayed but later became disused. The building now is a showdow of its former glory. The explore Ive always fancied to have a look around this building and never got the chance too... until recently. Its quite an unusual looking building but that said it would make a very nice modern Gym. Entry was fairly easy if you have common sense, and its nice to get out with a new member. Theres not much really else to say about this building... just watch out for the tourist who don't share the same interest as you when it comes to abandonment. The pictures @SILVERSKULL2004 if your still on the forum nice meeting you and a good mooch that... Cheers for reading I know it's a bit of a small one but o'well LBE
  5. Woolley Hall The history Woolley Hall is a landscape park largely unchanged since 1800. The park is associated with a Jacobean Hall (dated to around 1635 with later alterations). Features include wooded pleasure grounds, a ha-ha, kitchen garden and ponds. The main house is Grade II listed and the courtyard is Grade II listed as being of Special Architectural and Historic Interest. Michael Wentworth began rebuilding Woolley Hall in 1635. The new Woolley Hall consisted of an 'H'-shaped building of moderate size. An east wing was added to the south front around 1680. The western wing was added during the mid eighteenth century. The eastern wings which form the rest of the present building were added in the early nineteenth century. The house is constructed of hammer-dressed sandstone, with a slate roof. There are four storeys including the attic and basement. Recently Woolley Hall went up for sale (2014) with a guide price of £3m from its owners, Wakefield Council. It was purchased in 2015 by new owners Commercial Development Projects (CDP). Plans were submitted (2016) for a hotel conversion for the Grade II listed building. (CDP) had put forward a proposal to create a 88-bedroom hotel, with function facilities to cater for 300 guests, spa treatment rooms and a gastro restaurant. But (CDP), sent an email to the council (2017) to say they have withdrawn the plans, but gave no explanation. In reaction to the withdrawal, assistant chief executive for resources and governance at Wakefield Council, Michael Clements said: “Wakefield Council agreed to sell Woolley Hall to a local developer last year. “The sale was conditional upon them developing the site into a boutique hotel. “Disappointingly, this deal has now fallen through. It is thought the proceeds would be used to re-invest council capital with a spoke person stating “The proceeds from the sale will be used to support the council’s capital investment plans across the district whilst it will also provide an annual budget saving to help us deal with the funding cuts imposed on us by the Government.” The explore The hall sits in pleasant surroundings and considering its recent endeavour has a boutique hotel it looks like efforts are been made to keep the hall well maintained. so... during a very windy February morning we moved in for a closer look. It was a little difficult to know where to start with this one as there were quite a few different access routes to the hall... Not knowing if we would be met by a security team we started documenting the building from a far whilst slowly moving in. The hall is quite something and reminded us of one of those old hammer house movies... albeit without Dracula. Moving slowly to the east side of the hall we came across what looked like an old boiler house... although four boilers remained only one was operational... perhaps part of the councils money saving scheme. Making our way though we entered the main hall.. Surprisingly most of the rooms original architecture is preserved with some rather exquisite flooring and panelling. although some of the rooms were accessible most of the doors were bolted and without wrecking what looked like a very well preserved old door we decided to document what we could and move on. Although the main hall was the main attraction we decided to explore some of the stable blocks to the north of the hall... It looks like this was used by council departments including Wakefield social services among others. Largely empty with left overs from its office days with little else on offer. There was some very unusual looking housing quarters although we could not find any entry to these building. On leaving the stable blocks we were met by a very pleasant care taker who gave us a little history whilst politely telling us to f*uck off... The pics The main hall The stable block The boiler house oh well time for a game of golf... LBE
  6. Daresburyhall - Photographic report - Feb 2018 Daresbury Hall is a former Georgian country house in the village of Daresbury, Cheshire, England. It was built in 1759 for George Heron. the hall descended in the Heron family until 1850, when it became the property of Samuel Beckett Chadwick. By 1892 it had been acquired by Sir Gilbert Greenall, later Baron Daresbury. During the Second World War, it was used as a military hospital and also by a charity, now known as Scope. It became semi-derelict after being bought by a millionaire who died before restoration could take place. In April 2015, a huge cannabis farm containing six hundred plants with an estimated street value of 750.000 was discovered at the estate. In 2016 there were plans to partly demolish and convert the house but in June of that year the empty building was badly damaged by fire. Unfortunately, during our visit, we were asked to leave the sight by security via a speaker system on the estate. We did, however, stick around for 20 mins until it went off again, to be honest, I'm not sure whether the system is automated and linked to motion sensors. There is a lot of cameras on the sight too as shown the last pic. Any way we couldn't enter the property as it is completely sealed now with boards on all windows and doors etc except for a stable and a few dilapidated sheds. We did the best we could in the situation we had. Thanks for any feedback.
  7. A bit of a pain in the back side to get in this one, they have really made an effort with those fences! There was no security though, once you find a way past the doubled up security fences it's smooth sailing. We did find one particular part of this place rather creepy, there is a rotten bed in a dark basement that was quite eerie and had a different feel than the rest of the decaying building. More information will follow on our website in a day or so.
  8. Explore This was a fairly easy explore as these buildings are not as protected as the main college and the park relies on tourists to inform security about any vandals. The gymnasium was the hardest to get into as we had to avoid getting seen by any onlookers. So going at a later time of day would be advised. You should be cautious if you get further into the student centre as some of the doors looked to be alarmed. The classrooms are in the open and not surrounded by anything so you are likely to be spotted by security or tourists. We had a run in with security who were quite well mannered and laid back. All they said was that we were not to go near the building as it is a demolition site. Explored with @little_boy_explores History Student Centre I can't believe they left this in the open Gymnasium We didn't need to this door Classrooms
  9. History In the 14th century the Bretton estate was owned by the Dronsfields and passed by marriage to the Wentworths in 1407. King Henry VIII spent three nights in the old hall and furnishings, draperies and panelling from his bedroom were moved to the new hall. A hall is marked on Christopher Saxton's 1577 map of Yorkshire... The present building was designed and built around 1720 by its owner, Sir William Wentworth assisted by James Moyser to replace the earlier hall. In 1792 it passed into the Beaumont family, (latterly Barons and Viscounts Allendale), and the library and dining room were remodelled by John Carrin 1793. Monumental stables designed by George Basevi were built between 1842 and 1852. The hall was sold to the West Riding County Council in 1947. Before the sale, the panelling of the "Henry VIII parlour" (preserved from the earlier hall) was given to Leeds City Council and moved to Temple Newsam house. The hall housed Bretton Hall College from 1949 until 2001 and was a campus of the University of Leeds from 2001 to 2007. Explore Work began on site in march 2016... The MüllerVanTol studio has been appointed to design the interiors of the Grade II listed mansion and the refurbishment of other listed buildings is well underway. Most of the 11 student dwellings which were built in the 1960's and 1970's have been demolished including Eglinton, Litherop, Swithen and Haigh, Grasshopper will be the last to go in late 2017. A real shame considering the position of the college which specialised in design, drama, music and other performing arts with notable alumna attending. The Hall itself resides in 500 acres of park land which is home to the Yorkshire Sculpture park (YSP). (YSP) was the first of it's kind within the UK and his the largest in Europe, providing the only the place to see Barbara Hepworth and Bronzes by Henry Moore. Over 300,000 visitors are said to visit the park each year and on previous visits its been easy to blend into the crowd and walk around the exterior of the old Hall this said access internally as always been restricted. Access to the Hall today is strictly prohibited and is protected by 6ft metal fencing which spans the entire grounds including former classrooms and the stable block and more so their is a high presence of security on site with the developers keen to keep the public away. Recently signs have appeared to restrict the public taking pictures near the Hall itself... typical signs read (restricted use of photography in this area). The developers seem to be going to extreme lengths to protect the design ideas of the Hall and are passing these restriction onto local media and staff working onsite... I'm guessing the developers are wanting to keep their plans secret until the grand opening later in 2019. During the festive Holiday period we decided to pay a visit... making our way to some of the former classrooms and the student centre. This led to the stable block passing by the former dwellings and down to the main hall. We were surprised to have got this far and would have been more than happy with some nice externals of the buildings on site. YSP was very quiet and we were aware of sticking out in the surroundings so decided to head inside. Making our way down to the hall we were sure we would be found before we had chance to pull out our cameras. We were quite taken away by the sheer scope of the refurbishment and the beautiful restoration work been carried out we soon forgot about the threats of been in the Hall. Slowly documenting our visit and proceeding through the Halls rooms we became aware our explore light could be attracting unwanted attention from the outside as daylight was running out. Turning it off where possible it was obvious that it would be shining like a beacon through the Halls many rooms, we decided to head out with the premise of returning in the morning. Unfortunately on our return we were met by the security who TBH was sympathetic in escorting us off the premises. It seems like our well documented day at Bretton Hall was a one off and maybe we will have to wait to see how the restoration unfolds when the Hall is reborn as an hotel. Pics 1. Entrance Arcade belonging to former stable block (circa 1800). 2. Beaumont Bull & Wentworth Griffin above the columns on each side of the archway below the cupola. 3. Lost student art outside the experimental theatre... former carriage house 4. Looking down the Colonnade 5. The stable courtyard 6. The south range of Bretton hall dates back to 1720 9. Giant pilasters supporting the pendent at the north range of Bretton Hall 8. Three storey nine-by-five-bay main range. 9. Pathway leading to the exterior of the former library 10. Former Orangery 11. Plaque detailing the history 12. Former dinning room with marble fireplace 13. Typical Rococo style in the former dining room 14. Typically their would have been a frieze around the fireplace 15. Looking up at the glazed dome 16. Looks like restoration as begun on the pendentives 17. Former drawing room with its spectacular baroque ceiling 18. Close a look at the baroque ceiling 19. Originally Regency Library then later converted to a display room. 21. Left overs from the colleague era 22. looks like works yet to begin in this area of the hall 23. Leading back to the library 24. restoration of the cove Acoustics to amplify sound in the music room 25. Light hanging from the Adam style celling 26. South ranges main staircase 27. Main staircase with a wrought iron railing 28. Stone stairs leading down to the basement 29. A form of art nouveau 30. Inside the main range 31. Coving shelves 32. Beautiful example of a transom window 33. Mid - century scandinavian style chair 34. Adam style celling's from 1770 35. Developer keeping with the original sash windows 36. Groin vaulted passage with three arches and piers decorated with grisaille paintings in the Portico Hall Added buildings from the former college days 37. The gymnasium 38. exterior of former classrooms 39. Former student centre reception 40. Corridoor leading to the classrooms 41. The student centre was empty 42. Damaged computer 43. Locked 44. typical student dormitory 45. recreational room 46. Entrance to one of the very few remaining former dormitory buildings The history of the Bretton Hall could be a thread all on its own ... as could the documentation of the architecture its position as educational faculty and importantly the future usage of the Hall as an entertainment venue. I've done my best to condense this were possible and in doing so have provided a comprehensive report regarding Bretton Hall.. Hope you enjoyed the report
  10. Kings Hall Cinema, Southall, London - September 2017 Interesting one this one! I'd wanted to do this for a while and had been planning to in the coming weeks but had been put off with the idea of its "unique access" which requires some planning in terms of times of entry! Situated on a very busy road with lots of passersby and businesses open till the very wee hours, there is a very small window to get inside as the Night Shift commute changes to the Early and Day Shift Commute. When we arrived it was around midnight and the streets were busy. We were in London so went for a little drive for an hour or so before returning. Visited with a non-member back in September;when inside we had a little lie down in a dark corner for an hour or so to allow the sun to rise just a little bit, and spent about 2 hours light painting the rooms which were boarded and anything which the abundance of daylight wouldn't help. It's a very interesting building with lots to shoot photos of and with my "loaded" parking meter fast running out, we didn't have as much time inside as we would have liked. The air inside is terrible (understandably) and the damp has caused the parquet floors inside much of the building to bow upwards, making an interesting effect! We started shooting inside the main hall at around 6am and spent some time chilling here and getting photos as the sun came up, but we only had till 8am on the car park. The street was already very busy down below by 6am and the main hall had a hue of red from some of the shops signage. When it did become time to leave, we had to jump into a street full of commuters. We were not getting out without being seen. It was 7:45am and the bus stops had queues of people at them. As I was leaving I did attempt to not be seen, but a middle aged chap turned round and looked right at me. I wished him a good morning, jumped down and walked off to get my externals. He certainly looked slightly bewildered. The cinema come Methodists Church is located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was constructed in 1916; designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The site has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was originally operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and was soon playing religious films. By 1926, Kings Hall was operating as a regular cinema; but was however still managed by the Methodist church. The Cinema was closed in 1937. It then converted back to its original Methodist Church use, and today is the King’s Hall Methodist Church. Some interesting and otherwise controversial quotes taken from comments when closure was announced. The church vacated the site in 2012. More Info at: http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/31352 #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157688232708403
  11. Built in 1884 Villa S. ist regarded as the first casino at this coast. After decades of desertion and decay it burned down in 2006. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13
  12. King’s Hall Southall Visited with @GK_WAX and @Lavino. This was a long arsed day but a good un non the less. The lads picked me up just gone midnight for the long drive down south. I’d been to a gig and I was smashed hoping to get some sleep in the car. Fat chance of that. After nailing some greasy takeaway on my way back from town and downing a crate of redbulls I was pretty awake, sobered up and ready for some derpingz. After gaining access, which was very straightforward we found ourselves a lovely skanky little room to chill out in for a couple of hours whilst we waited for sunrise. Bumped into two other explorers in there who gave @GK_WAX a heart attack LOL! It’s a pretty cool place this, a lot bigger than what photo’s you see online, but all of the rooms at the back are pretty much the same old derpy office/classroom type and not much character to photograph. It’s amazing that this place hasn’t been shut for as long as it looks because it’s super fooked. Absolutely hammered with pigeons and mountains of their shit. Plaster falling down from every possible point, the floors are all warped like some big shit parquet Mexican wave, but still it is a pretty unique building with some lovely tiling and worth popping over to if you’re around this way. After here we tried a few other places in the area and on the way back, sadly to no avail. You can’t win em all eh. So yeah long arse drive home just in time to watch the footy order a pizza and get back on the beers. History Located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was built in 1916 and was designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The King’s Hall building has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and it was soon screening religious films. By 1926, it was operating as a regular cinema, still managed by the Methodist church. The King’s Hall Cinema was closed in 1937. It then reverted back to a Methodist Church use as the King’s Hall Methodist Church. They vacated the building in January 2013. Pics
  13. A very early start for this one. And thanks for my invite from the other 2 lads I went with @GK-WAX and @albinojay arrived here in the pitch black early hours. Luckily we didn’t have any trouble finding our way inside. We’re we found ourselves a room to wait for it to come light enough to have a look around. Watching the bustop across the road. That’s one seriously busy bustop. And another 2 guys turned up giving us a surprise we exchanged a few word and we all carried on. Here’s a few photos and history.. HISTORY Located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was built in 1916 and was designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The King’s Hall building has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and it was soon screening religious films. By 1926, it was operating as a regular cinema, still managed by the Methodist church. The King’s Hall Cinema was closed in 1937. It then reverted back to a Methodist Church use as the King’s Hall Methodist Church. They vacated the building in January 2013" 6C566847-A7B2-4B03-8B35-21A83B59D5DD by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 11C63D3A-09F5-4CAF-B8DC-2D9DBAE3A34F by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DF9E3CFA-46FB-4F59-8E89-05044F4D4E0D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 291685A1-C7A5-4C05-AE0D-EAA5E9E3BE3D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr A942D367-319B-4051-9965-CBC9BE782D97 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr B6451F47-AED7-46C9-BC1F-FBB8716DC866 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr EFEFBB87-D905-4675-B792-572677174349 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 4FF422D0-9457-4DBB-A0FD-B3A59E0105DA by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 6388F9DD-1E6B-43E1-B475-C54D7702ADD7 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 8F93F594-6E02-49A8-90EE-77146630400A by Lavino lavino, on Flickr F0EA6489-742D-4A55-B053-E9407A809A35 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr D6912FEB-7A41-4075-BF3F-18CC92A71332 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 82C5654A-58D8-4F3D-ABA7-6FFA3CE99615 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr EF6C4F61-3E43-4EA3-99E3-79E7A4CD7986 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 7E8CA3B9-870B-4597-BE8C-822A743FA4B8 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 05FFBC9B-A065-4D18-ADAA-AC06F324A28C by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 596A95BD-32DA-4213-9C8E-06061841A60B by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 732BCB12-D01B-4F4E-9ADF-B1C86B4F2D95 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 0CCE03D2-1009-4B27-BF40-1FC90159D5C5 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 170B80EE-4ADD-4D0C-9AEE-076DA9AA07D3 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 31BAC71F-DB78-462D-ABC1-08C4DAB3AC19 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 31BAC71F-DB78-462D-ABC1-08C4DAB3AC19 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 2A00922B-01E0-4236-9129-02F812E7E710 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DF19BB97-1E29-4ECC-8B17-A1A4B30B7C95 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr E4354E42-97FB-4BA5-BC76-2304A4DF14CC by Lavino lavino, on Flickr D3A585BC-9EA7-4A96-A87E-58351FCC62B2 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr C88FDA25-E4EC-4269-9D64-A91725F507F2 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 9A4FC978-0A5C-43D3-A340-BF4ABF5EC679 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 6FED0FA9-4A21-4C0B-ABB0-1D6C5EB0721D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 5056F5C5-4624-400D-BF20-7ECF2C724B3E by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 0D7DEB4E-2C2C-4A67-82C6-A80B4153E5DF by Lavino lavino, on Flickr E3A4C8B4-8A02-4816-85BF-51EED2EDFEFD by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 18858080-1428-48B5-8F3F-2416CDCDF481 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 2FA9A65E-7F5B-4BE6-A4E8-2418BAABEB71 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  14. This one required an early start, but the morning adventure to The Kings Hall was worth the effort. Visited with Zombizza. History "Located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was built in 1916 and was designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The King’s Hall building has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and it was soon screening religious films. By 1926, it was operating as a regular cinema, still managed by the Methodist church. The King’s Hall Cinema was closed in 1937. It then reverted back to a Methodist Church use as the King’s Hall Methodist Church. They vacated the building in January 2013" The Explore Started nice and early, and managed our entrance fairly incident free...if we don't count the massive tear in my trousers.. It's a pretty spectacular place with a wonderful blend of natural decay and marvelous original features/architecture. With little to no daylight, we decided to wonder round the back rooms while the sun came up before the spending too much time on the main attraction, the large auditorium. The rooms around the back are a weird mix of new and old, some of them being more disgusting than others. One room was so pungent that I took 2 steps in before bailing out. There was also one room that was filled with beds, old food packets and needles. Looked a few years old, but squatters for sure. The larger rooms consisted of meeting rooms, prayer rooms and teaching rooms. All of them had funky wavy flooring where the wooden floor tiles had expanded with moisture. Eventually the sun came up and the auditorium started to flood with the golden morning light. After a few hours we left, although the exit was hilariously unsubtle. Photos The Auditorium
  15. Explored with Rott3nW00d & Raz; So the last report was killing me as there wasn't one single decent photo out of the lot... So we went for a revisit History; Firbeck Hall was formerly the home of 19th-century architect and writer Henry Gally Knight who is assumed to have been a principal information source for Walter Scott during the writing of Ivanhoe. Firbeck Hall was built in 1594 by William West, who made a fortune practising law and serving as an associate to Gilbert Talbot, 7th Earl of Shrewsbury from 1580 to 1594. West was the author of a legal textbook called Symbolaeographia. In his will of 1598, West stipulated that "a grave stone be set for me and my said wife in Firbeck Church, and ingraven with our arms and names and some posy." Country Club In 1935 a Sheffield stockbroker, Cyril Nicholson, opened the hall as a country club, investing £80,000 in its renovation. The interior was dramatically modernised and featured a mirror-walled ballroom and an elaborate and versatile state-of-the-art lighting system. There was also a heated outdoor swimming pool. Membership fees ranged from three to seven guineas, and the club was patronised by the likes of Amy Johnson and the then Prince of Wales. Such was the reputation of the club, that the BBC transmitted its weekly Saturday show "Late Night Dance Music" with Henry Hall, Carroll Gibbons and Charlie Kunz from Firbeck. Second World War – present day At the outbreak of the Second World War, the hall was used by Sheffield Royal Infirmary and the Royal Air Force, with the adjacent aerodrome becoming RAF Firbeck. After the War, the building was bought by the Miners Welfare Commission for use as a rehabilitation centre for injured miners. This centre closed in 1984. It was purchased by Cambridge Construction. From then the Hall fell into a state of disrepair. The Explore; As mentioned above i have recently posted a report on this location but the photos and quality were dire. So off we went for another look. 1 year had passed since our last visit and if the place was knackered before its even worse now!! floors that were safe last time have collapsed, some of the doors were bearing the full weight of the wall/house above them and if you tried to move quickly anywhere you were pretty likely to be seriously injured if not worse. All the upstairs in now pretty much unaccessable unless you have a death wish so we missed out on one of the best stair cases i've seen All in all this place will soon not need to be knocked down as it will have fallen down of its own accord and if you do go, the swimming pool is the best bit by far Photos; Wrote my page name on this plate on my last visit Spent about 45 mins playing with long exposure at the end - brilliant fun If you got this far, thanks for looking
  16. This was the last stop on our trip on Sunday, was a little bit of a let down. History - Cornist Hall, built sometime in the early 1700s, is a former luxury mansion located in the town of Flint, Wales. It is a Jacobethan style brick and stone structure; although this term was not coined until 1933, and it was the birthplace of Thomas Totty, an admiral who served on the HMS Invincible and alongside Lord Nelson. The town of Flint itself, which derives its name from the Latin term castellum super fluentum (meaning ‘castle on the river’), was a major port and since the 1200s people have inhabited the area for the convenient shape of the land. In later years Flint became well-know for its close proximity to Liverpool, for naval and trade purposes; their main forms of trade principally involved fish and the slave markets. By 1884, the house was purchased by the industrialist, Richard Muspratt, and he commissioned John Douglas, an architect from Chester, to entirely remodel the mansion throughout. Unfortunately, Muspratt died before the house could be altered. The Summers family, who ran an ironworks business; John Summers and Sons in Shotton, were the next to take the house on, and they managed to proceed with making the much needed alterations to the building. By 1953, however, the ownership of the mansion changed hands once again, when it was passed to the Local Authority. After the Local Authority assumed ownership the building was modified internally for catering purposes. The Hall remained in the ownership of the Local Authority up until 1986, when the Napier family purchased the property. It was later redeveloped into a wedding and banqueting venue. Although it was a popular scene, the Hall was eventually converted into the local golf club’s club-house. Despite the change of hands, Cornist Hall continued to cater for weddings up until its closure in 2012. Since its closure, Flint’s local community have petitioned to save the building, in the hope that it will gain listed status and fall under the ownership of the local populace. In the past few years, since the closure of Cornist Hall, a number of local people have complained about the increase in anti-social behaviour and vandalism, suggesting that the former mansion is a magnet for such activities.
  17. History: This is a dominating Neoclassical Grade II listed mansion situated in Shropshire. It was originally constructed in 1735 and stands in a magnificent parkland of nearly 1500 acres of land. The mansion is famed for it's four giant iconic columns and was once owned by royalty. It's nickname 'House of Tears' comes from the fact that three of it's owners died from tragic circumstances, two fatal car crashes and a suicide. The basement of the mansion was once used as a telecommunications headquarters during World War II for the spy network in Europe, much of the original equipment is still down there. The property was sold to developers in 2000 but they have neglected to carry out much work since, they recently put it back on the market and are currently undergoing some restoration work inside. Explore: Wanted to visit this one for a while, and after me and redhunter convinced loocyloo to pull a sickie and come with us, we were soon on our way up to Shropshire. After a while we gained access in probably the most awkward way possible, but hey we were in! Our exit was a little less dignified, with loocyloo getting stuck on the edge of a wall, and some top class bull from redhunter about how we found the place when confronted by angry farmers. "found it on the British heritage website, and no we definitely haven't been inside" actually worked?!? after threatening to confiscate our cameras and some strong protest from us they went to check the alarms, at which point we made a hasty exit through a field of not so happy cows.. On with some pictures i got from not going inside.. and to finish up, one i actually took from the outside!
  18. The Visit A very early morning start with redhunter, Funlester and a non member. Bumped into a farmer who asked what we were doing but some quick thinking that we were looking for some high ground to photograph the morning mist over the fields worked a treat and he left wishing us good luck! This is a great explore and some fantastic features inside, real shame we couldn't access the basement but a great explore otherwise The History This is a dominating Neoclassical Grade II listed mansion situated in Shropshire. It was originally constructed in 1735 and stands in a magnificent parkland of nearly 1500 acres of land. The mansion is famed for it's four giant iconic columns and was once owned by royalty. It's nickname 'House of Tears' comes from the fact that three of it's owners died from tragic circumstances, two fatal car crashes and a suicide. The basement of the mansion was once used as a telecommunications headquarters during World War II for the spy network in Europe, much of the original equipment is still down there. The property was sold to developers in 2000 but they have neglected to carry out much work since, they recently put it back on the market and are currently undergoing some restoration work inside.
  19. Visited the hall with @woopashoopaa @Telf and vulex, very nice this one. Even though you here voices while inside the back part is still live and used for the club house for the golf club. Some nice features still remain.so here's a bit of history I managed to dig up and a few pics... Cornist Hall was once the residence of the Sumners family who founded and owned the steel works at Shotton on Deeside, five or six miles away from Flint. Today the Hall has been turned into the local Golf Club's club-house, and part of it is used for wedding receptions and similar functions. It was used as a restaurant for a short time but failed to make money. The grounds of the Hall form the nine hole golf course and park. Many men from Flint once worked at the steel works, today most have been made redundant. It seems slightly ironic that they should spend their time playing golf on the land of the man who was once their employer.
  20. The Explore This is one I've seen pop up a few times lately so thought I'd check it myself.. as a few have mentioned access isn't the easiest and whoever owns this building seems to have a fetish for anti-vandal paint.. its everywhere, inside and out! After all this I was a little disappointed with the inside of this building sadly.. peoples pics on the forum certainly make it look better than it actually is Fun and games with a mirror ball and a few torches certainly cheered us up though The History Cornist Hall, built sometime in the early 1700s, is a former luxury mansion located in the town of Flint, Wales. It is a Jacobethan style brick and stone structure; although this term was not coined until 1933, and it was the birthplace of Thomas Totty, an admiral who served on the HMS Invincible and alongside Lord Nelson. The town of Flint itself, which derives its name from the Latin term castellum super fluentum (meaning ‘castle on the river’), was a major port and since the 1200s people have inhabited the area for the convenient shape of the land. In later years Flint became well-know for its close proximity to Liverpool, for naval and trade purposes; their main forms of trade principally involved fish and the slave markets. By 1884, the house was purchased by the industrialist, Richard Muspratt, and he commissioned John Douglas, an architect from Chester, to entirely remodel the mansion throughout. Unfortunately, Muspratt died before the house could be altered. The Summers family, who ran an ironworks business; John Summers and Sons in Shotton, were the next to take the house on, and they managed to proceed with making the much needed alterations to the building. By 1953, however, the ownership of the mansion changed hands once again, when it was passed to the Local Authority. After the Local Authority assumed ownership the building was modified internally for catering purposes. The Hall remained in the ownership of the Local Authority up until 1986, when the Napier family purchased the property. It was later redeveloped into a wedding and banqueting venue. Although it was a popular scene, the Hall was eventually converted into the local golf club’s club-house. Despite the change of hands, Cornist Hall continued to cater for weddings up until its closure in 2012. Since its closure, Flint’s local community have petitioned to save the building, in the hope that it will gain listed status and fall under the ownership of the local populace. In the past few years, since the closure of Cornist Hall, a number of local people have complained about the increase in anti-social behaviour and vandalism, suggesting that the former mansion is a magnet for such activities.
  21. This is first time out with my camera Nikon D5200 and first time doing any Urbex at all. Went out with two mates and big thanks for them for letting me tag along on this trip and a few more that ill post at some point. We tried one place first but couldn't get access. History The hall was built in the 1560s for the Winstanley family of Winstanley; the Winstanley family were lords of the manor since at least 1252 and may have been responsible for building the moat on the site. The Winstanleys owned the hall until 1596, when the estate was sold to James Bankes, a London goldsmith and banker. Winstanley Hall has three storeys and has a date stone with a date of 1584, but this is not in situ so may not provide an accurate date for the construction of the house. Extra blocks were added in the 17th and 18th centuries. Further and extensive alterations were made in 1811-19 by Lewis Wyatt in a Jacobean style. He moved the entrance to the left flank of the hall and replacing the original entrance with a window. The final additions to the hall were made in 1843 when an extra wing was added. To the south, on lands belonging to the hall, is a small stone building which was used to house bears that provided entertainment for the hall's guests. The Winstanley Family also owned the Braunstone Hall estate. The Bankes family retained ownership of the hall until the 21st century when it was sold for private development. The hall had been kept in good condition until the 1960s when habitation stopped. As the building decayed and the cost of maintaining Winstanley Hall was too much for the family it was sold on. It was intended to develop the hall into private flats, however refurbishment was held up due to Wigan council withholding planning permission.
  22. The Visit After a fantastic explore earlier in the day we were not expecting a great deal here but were pleasantly surprised by this places charm and character.. all kind of bits and bobs about telling a story of the people that once lived there. I believe its known as Red Dress Manor but seen as there is no red dress anymore I'm calling it "Blind Cat Manor" from now on in honour of the lovely blind and deaf (I think) cat that we said hello to on the way out The History Struggling to find detailed history unfortunately. Calcott Hall was grade II listed in 1953 and was home to a dairy farm built in 1725 And here is the poor little cat that seemed to be blind and deaf
  23. History “The longer it stays in the condition it is in, the reality of the situation is the more damaged the fabric of the site will become… We have seen what happened with sites like Denbigh Hospital – they were buildings that were allowed to fall into a condition of disrepair†(Cllr Aldridge). Cornist Hall, built sometime in the early 1700s, is a former luxury mansion located in the town of Flint, Wales. It is a Jacobethan style brick and stone structure; although this term was not coined until 1933, and it was the birthplace of Thomas Totty, an admiral who served on the HMS Invincible and alongside Lord Nelson. The town of Flint itself, which derives its name from the Latin term castellum super fluentum (meaning ‘castle on the river’), was a major port and since the 1200s people have inhabited the area for the convenient shape of the land. In later years Flint became well-know for its close proximity to Liverpool, for naval and trade purposes; their main forms of trade principally involved fish and the slave markets. By 1884, the house was purchased by the industrialist, Richard Muspratt, and he commissioned John Douglas, an architect from Chester, to entirely remodel the mansion throughout. Unfortunately, Muspratt died before the house could be altered. The Summers family, who ran an ironworks business; John Summers and Sons in Shotton, were the next to take the house on, and they managed to proceed with making the much needed alterations to the building. By 1953, however, the ownership of the mansion changed hands once again, when it was passed to the Local Authority. After the Local Authority assumed ownership the building was modified internally for catering purposes. The Hall remained in the ownership of the Local Authority up until 1986, when the Napier family purchased the property. It was later redeveloped into a wedding and banqueting venue. Although it was a popular scene, the Hall was eventually converted into the local golf club’s club-house. Despite the change of hands, Cornist Hall continued to cater for weddings up until its closure in 2012. Since its closure, Flint’s local community have petitioned to save the building, in the hope that it will gain listed status and fall under the ownership of the local populace. In the past few years, since the closure of Cornist Hall, a number of local people have complained about the increase in anti-social behaviour and vandalism, suggesting that the former mansion is a magnet for such activities. Our Version of Events After bombing through Wales, in our effort to conserve daylight, we eventually arrived in the town of Flint. It was a quiet scene, and we were conscious that we looked a little out of place, surrounded by local dog walkers and other country folk. So, to blend in a bit, and counter hunger and the long walk we’d created for ourselves from where we’d parked the cars, we [some of us] did a little berry picking on the way. We all survived, so I’m assuming they were edible. Once we reached the old Hall, it was heavily boarded up, so it required a little effort to get inside. As the history states above, the people in the surrounding area have become frustrated by the increasing illicit activity going on in the Hall. Having said that, they still failed to keep us out, and we were soon able to sample the delights Cornist Hall holds behind its wooden boards and ant-climb paint. For the most part, the building is quite stripped, although plenty still remains; including a working piano and an archaic record player. It would appear that bats have also taken up residence upstairs inside the building, which makes a pleasant change from fetid one-legged pigeons. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Meek-Kune-Do, The Hurricane, Box and Husky. 1: Cornist Hall 2: The Former Entrance 3: Racks and Stacks 4: Old Record Player 5: Record Player Close Up 6: The Piano 7: Old Furniture 8: Classic Fireplace 9: The Bar Upstairs 10: One of the Function Rooms 11: A Small Comfortable Side Room 12: Supplies in the Kitchen 13: The Kitchen 14: A Taste of the Upstairs Rooms 15: Bottom of the Main Staircase 16: The Clutter Downstairs 17: Downstairs Small Bar 18: Memorabilia 19: The Former Dining Room 20: Specials 21: The Dance Room 22: Another Bar 23: Weighing Up the Choices 24: Main Staircase Window 25: A Bad Taste in Curtains and Lampshades 26: The Main Staircase
  24. We visited this after a failed attempted at a different site. History Daresbury Hall is a former country house in the village of Daresbury, Cheshire, England. In 1755 John Daniell sold the manor of Daresbury to George Heron and the Hall was built about 1760.It remained in the Heron family until 1850 when it became the property of Samuel Beckett Chadwick. In 1892 Sir Gilbert Greenall is listed as the owner. For a time it was home to Lord Daresbury and his family as part of the original Greenall brewery family estate in it's prime, now known as The De Vere Group. During World War II the estate was converted to be used as a military hospital, which saw the addition of the Lewis Carol Unit added to the site. In 1955, shortly after the war, the Hall was taken over by the National Spastics Society, now known as “Scope†as a residential home with good facilities for adults suffering from cerebral palsy. Many more structures were built on the site to house the patients and staff such as the row of small houses at the front, outhouse buildings and the caretaker’s bungalow. Many village functions were also held in the Hall such as country dances, but eventually the residents were moved to other accommodation in Halton. Many years after the spastic society had vacated the premises, it was sold to a millionaire bachelor Malcolm Lionel Robert Royle for a sizeable fee and the manor returned to it's former use as a stately home. Mr. Royle was managing director of several companies, including Rains Estates and Smarties Nursery School, all to which can be evidentially seen within the building today. Such as endless records and files of what appears to be estate agent documents, leaflets, letters and even written cheques. Sadly, due to poor maintenance following his death the buildings have fallen into a state of disrepair and stands uninhabitable. The Manor was left exactly as the owner had left it for some time. Daresbury Hall has been designated by English Heritage as a grade II listed building and seeks planning permission to be restored – which may prove as an impossible task!
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