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  1. Falcon house. It's been in Swindon since the early days of this towns birth and has been sat empty and abandoned for 16 years. It was said to be the very first headquarters for the well known company zurich, an insurance company, but was promptly moved to a more practical and efficient property. The old office block is situated in Swindon town centre on top of a car park right near the entrance to town, which is an eye sore to some but a worthy explore for us. There was nothing much left, only old phones and some really old school computer stuff. It was the view at the end of the video that made it all worth it, being the second highest point in the town aside from the john murray building. What a view! So please enjoy this video by my good friend and make sure to check out the channel! Have fun out there, C
  2. Cultural house. Concert hall scene. Paintings of the 1976 cultural house concert hall walls in Lithuania. #loveurbex
  3. Another old explore ...a little gem in Kent
  4. Due to annoying incidents quite well known. Meanwhile, a lot was looted here and destroyed as much by vandalism. Visited May 2018 with @The_Raw and @Miss.Anthrope. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
  5. Anzani House is a detached, self-contained 6-storey building totalling 144,000 sq. ft in area with central courtyard and surrounded by surface car parking situated on Trinity Avenue, Felixstowe approximately 2 miles from the town centre and adjacent to Felixstowe Port. Myself & a friend went here to explore last October & found a way in. We parked at the BP garage nearby & walked up towards the building. We got to the site at 6:45am on a Saturday morning. That way there would not be that much activity in the area at that time. Plenty of CCTV cameras everywhere, so watch out & try to not look too shifty I have since tried to get in & found no entry whatsoever. Gutted. Might try again soon. Hope you enjoy the pics.
  6. First post on here guys so hope it works! Tipped off by a friend Matt about this house I decided to go one cold winter morning to see it for myself on a solo run. Entry into the house a tricky assault course through the overgrown garden which hasn't been tended to for decades by the look of it. A very peculiar house this in that its location is in a sleepy little village of pure chocolate box quintessential Englishness. A more desirable a place to live would be hard to find to get away form the chaos of city life. Clean air and peaceful surroundings, the parish church all capture the imagination yet this house contradicts everything around it. Somewhat derelict with overgrown gardens, a rusty old iron gate with a disappearing path leading up to the house don't fit in to its surroundings. What the local residents make of it I'd love to know. Why it has been left to fall into such a bad state is anyone's guess. I would imagine the house itself is worth a lot of money having 4 bedrooms and a lot of land regardless of the location which I'd imagine to be quite expensive to live in. Doesn't anyone own the house and if so why have they just left it for so long to fall into disrepair? It's not really secured either so it doesn't seem like anyone ever goes to the house to check on it. Very strange. From the decor and the possessions still left inside I'd date it becoming abandoned around the mid 1980s. Piles and piles of newspapers - mainly The Daily Mail & The Telegraph - clutter each room. Using a tripod proved tricky as the floors were covered in stacks of old newspapers. The most recent date I could find without checking all the hundreds left around was 1984. Maybe one of the former residents was a hoarder of newspapers? In the entire house there were literally thousands left behind no room escaped their occupancy. There were few clues as to who lived here, just names on envelopes which obviously won't be revealed. What their occupations were I have no idea. Downstairs were two reception rooms littered with vintage possessions including several televisions a typewriter a Bakelite rotary telephone amongst other things. The most interesting items were the framed portraits of children. Who were they and where are they now? Piles of old photographs and personal documents were left behind on the writing/study desk seemingly unwanted by anyone. A double split staircase leads to the upstairs bedrooms. Two were empty so weren't photographed, the other two still had everything left behind including clothes and yet more newspapers. I always think that every abandoned home must have an owner somewhere. It seems this one - despite its obvious appeal to potential buyers - seems to be truly abandoned with no one left to have any interest in it. Enjoy the images
  7. This was a full fun visit and a lovely tricky one to get in to. History Brogyntyn Hall was constructed in 1975. It was a residence of members of the princely dynasty of the Welsh kingdom of Powys and one of the houses of the gentry in late medieval Wales. It subsequently came into the possession of the Ormsby-Gore family, Lord Harlech. Unfortunately a string of tragedies including two Lords Harlech dying without wills, leaving massive death duties to be paid, saw the decline of the family fortunes and subsequent sale of the Hall. Interestingly it was also used during the war by British Telecom as headquarters for communications for the spy network operating in Europe.
  8. Another short report from me, this was my second Urbex excursion so I'm keeping them short to kinda test the waters a bit before I go all out and find bigger places (or at least more interesting ones) with better equipment. I couldn't find anything about the place online but from what I gathered someone was evicted and then burglars came and stripped the place. That's just what I got from the graffiti drawn on by someone who has never attended an English class, although there are a lot of those types around here XD. Anyway, enjoy the pictures!
  9. A very old farm house early 1800's id say..it was or sale what i found in here was unlike anything id every found before A large roomy house thats an old piano.. This was the 1stof a few finds..the painting was bolted to the wall...seemed hard to remove without destroying it this might have something to do with this next room the words die die die die...carved into a bedroom door with a padlock on it the walls inside the room had scratches all over them... translate anyone caught 2 clear voices in this room A room with carpet on the door the mist in on the left...what could that be.. the house was for sale cheap but noone wanted to buy it...it was eventually torn down... I caught two clear voices in the bathroom ...you can hear the word paris(which is my name)..and boo..i heard footsteps while i was there but nothing on film...i reget not taking that painting..hope it was save befor it bwas torn down...
  10. Hi all, we are back already with another video! This time we had been tipped off of an abandoned Chinese resturant in Southampton and what an explore it was! It turns out that everything had been left behind although the place being slightly trashed. I couldn't find to much in regards to history of this place but I don't think it's too extensive but after looking at the reviews it seems pretty obvious why this place was closed down as it was stated as having terrible customer service and wasn't very hygenic. Hope you like the video, like always open to feedback. I am looking at getting new equipment to help with low light so please bear with me!
  11. 2nd to last explore this one,happened to be along our route back toward ferry port so as Urban Junky had mentioned he popped in here when we met up at the hotel it seemed rude not to go have a look.. Seems it was some form of coal washing site from what ive been told.. There is a inscription in the wall outside and it reads.. This sorting laundry was built with the help of Credit marshall testimony of the generosity of the united states of America.. Well thats how google translates it.The site is massive big holes everywhere and brutal concrete design we spent hours wandering about shooting this place. explored with Sx-riffraff SpaceInvader Big ugly and full of angles to shoot ,so in all i loved it
  12. this house always gave me the creeps as i drove by..then i noticed it was abadoned...I asked around and found out A Mrs Coffee live there..known as the town meanie..she had a hard life..her only son was killed in a car accident..her husband committed sucide..she had a daughter but noone knew anything about her... The basement held the sad reminders..a buys and girls bike for children long gone... the old lady had started hoarding... the house was unlivable who knows how she got around books were everywhere several rooms were so pack all i could do was poke my camera in the door that painting came home with me.. this was the master bedroom..it was impassable i think the old lady slept in the bathtub now to the really creepy room...judging by the art it looks like late 60s early 70's wow weaird as hell..seems the daught noone knew about left as a young child or died with the brother in the same accident...because her bed room is largly unchanged since the 1970s A very strange room the kitchen was the only toom in the hoiuse that seemed normal it was once a nice house.. i watched as workers picked over the house..i saw them smiling with arm fulls of stuff they decided to keep...i went in a few more times to find it almost completely stripped...i found dolls in unopened boxes..it was near chirstmas time so i took them and out them in the donation boxes for kids..before the other scavangers could grab them..they tore the house down..and quickly built another who sold quickly a new familt now lives on this spot.... I caught several voices thought my walkthough gost of this haunted doll house...makes me wonder if the new house is haunted too...
  13. Campina Youth House Haven't seen this one posted anywhere so I decided to chuck a quick report up on it. I would say this particular location could be described as disused rather than abandoned, as it looked like there was redevelopment work going on when we arrived. Hence why it is so nice and pristine. Anyway, onto a little bit of history I found.. History The Youth House was orginally built as a leisure centre in Campina. A city situated roughly around the South East of Romania. It was constructed by local authorites in order to create a space for young people to participate in a range of sporting activities such as: aerobics, matrial arts and boxing. It was also established in order to promote culture and education and the house provided various facilities for the arts. The Youth House hosted a large auditorium to showcase fairs, exhibitions, conventions, concerts and festivals. Visit Visited with @darbians and @Gigi on a long weekend trip to Romania. We were driving past and saw what we orginally thought was a hotel and decided to check it out. Finding this place was defintely an unsuspected susprise and I'm very glad we decided to pull over. I really enjoyed photographing this one and I espiecally liked the mosiacs which reminded me of the ones at Buzludzha I had seen the previous year. I hope you enjoy my report! When you find a window open on the top floor, gotta get a few photos from the roof Thanks for reading!
  14. We had no idea how we would get on here. After driving through the night and arriving in the early hours, our entry was just awful! As we sat in the freezing cold, and the light started to appear at the windows, we could see it was worth the effort. Visited with @SpiderMonkey, obvs! History The Royal High School was constructed between 1826 to 1829 on the south face of Calton Hill in Edinburgh, at a cost of £34,000. Of this £500 was given by King George IV ‘as a token of royal favour towards a School, which, as a royal foundation, had conferred for ages incalculable benefits on the community’. It was designed in a neoclassical Greek Doric style by Thomas Hamilton, who modelled the portico and Great Hall on the Hephaisteion of Athens. After the Old Royal High School was vacated in 1968, the building became available and was refurbished to accommodate a new devolved legislature for Scotland. However, the 1979 devolution referendum failed to provide sufficient backing for a devolved assembly. Its debating chamber was later used for meetings of the Scottish Grand Committee, the committee of Members of Parliament in the United Kingdom House of Commons with constituencies in Scotland. Subsequently, the building has been used as offices for departments of Edinburgh City Council, including The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award unit and the Sports and Outdoor Education unit. With the passage of the Scotland Act 1998 and the introduction of Scottish devolution in 1999, the Old Royal High School was again mooted as a potential home for the new Scottish Parliament. Eventually, however, the Scotland Office decided to site the new legislature in a purpose-built structure in the Holyrood area of the Canongate. A number of uses have been suggested for the building, including a home for a Scottish National Photography Centre. As of 2015, Edinburgh City Council – the building’s current owners – have initiated a project to lease the building to be used as a luxury hotel. Finally a few shots of the grand neoclassical exterior...
  15. When i was a kid this was known as Crazy Marys house...The rumor was she froze to death but had pleanty of money to put the heat on....it wasent true..she was a mean old lady for sure who scared the crap out of me screeching at me when i walked by..Her Husband was a doctor and who killed himself in the house..he was an old fashiong doctor...back in his day you never went to a hospitol you went to the doctors house...he amputated arms, legs, preformed surgury in the basement.. He died in the late 1960s his wife in the 1980s...the house has never see anyone stay there for long..they alway seem to move out After crazy mary died workers came to clean out the house..my friend knew one and he went in..i was still too scared..he came out with an skeltons skull and jaw...old time doctors used to have them...he lured me in and i saw a room filled with sinks and it was all to creepy for me its been empty for years..and looters took the starecase and all the copper.. check out the floors a homless person had moved in an kept himself warm almost burning the house down For such a big house the doctor never had any children th The house is for sale but it needs alot ofrepairs andthe neighborhood has declined so no one can afford it heres my video walkthough i hear a few ghostly voices
  16. Ok the ice house opened 1900 closed 1990 ......NO ONE TOLD ME ABOUT THE DOME CAMERA ......... 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. Thanks for looking [email protected]@l..........
  17. Daresburyhall - Photographic report - Feb 2018 Daresbury Hall is a former Georgian country house in the village of Daresbury, Cheshire, England. It was built in 1759 for George Heron. the hall descended in the Heron family until 1850, when it became the property of Samuel Beckett Chadwick. By 1892 it had been acquired by Sir Gilbert Greenall, later Baron Daresbury. During the Second World War, it was used as a military hospital and also by a charity, now known as Scope. It became semi-derelict after being bought by a millionaire who died before restoration could take place. In April 2015, a huge cannabis farm containing six hundred plants with an estimated street value of 750.000 was discovered at the estate. In 2016 there were plans to partly demolish and convert the house but in June of that year the empty building was badly damaged by fire. Unfortunately, during our visit, we were asked to leave the sight by security via a speaker system on the estate. We did, however, stick around for 20 mins until it went off again, to be honest, I'm not sure whether the system is automated and linked to motion sensors. There is a lot of cameras on the sight too as shown the last pic. Any way we couldn't enter the property as it is completely sealed now with boards on all windows and doors etc except for a stable and a few dilapidated sheds. We did the best we could in the situation we had. Thanks for any feedback.
  18. Explored a long road and found a house that was abandoned, some evidence of vandalism, not the most interesting of building but the way it has naturally fallen is quite beautiful
  19. With a 2.5 meter high, fully reinforced security fence, cameras at every angle and motion sensors tucked away in strategical places, this building was designed to keep people out. A load of good that did, eh? This building is shrouded in mystery, its former use was totally unknown and even google wasn't any help! Turns out it was the old headquarters for the Department of work and pensions, but they could not afford to keep it running, so became a rejected building for social security. No one has ever documented this building and not a single photo of the insides can be found.. Until now. Not my fanciest of camera work but the night time was the best time for this trip. So granted the shots could be better but with not a lot of time on our hands (and maybe setting a motion detector off) we had to make do! The building itself was actually very clean and tidy, in and out. Fair bit of dust and clutter from the stripping off pipes from underneath the flooring but no graffiti, no vandalism.. Not a single sign of "outsiders". Truly trapped in time with 1990's tech scattered, but nothing of worth, just old school things that required Ethernet and a few tapes and old floppy disks. For the most part it was quiet and things were calm, the main worry was watching for the missing floor panels and pesky motion sensors above a certain few doors. So I gather most office blocks like this are still protected (A company called 'clear way') which is kind of surprising considering how long it has been abandoned and I cannot find out anything to do with that buildings future. Originally used as a primary headquarters for the department of work and pensions, handling data and dealing with data to do with peoples income and possibly entitlement of benefits, sits unused and had been abandoned between around 2002 but the exact time is yet to be known. It was being used through the 90's that's for sure with lift service sheets with the last service being 2002 and floppy disks and tapes dating through the 90's. It is unfortunate we could not see the whole building, as out of the three floors it had only the ground and second were explored. The lower ground floor proved to be a challenge as that's were the sensors really were, so we decided to leave it and head out quiet as a mouse. But not without having one last look at the glass atrium of course. Over all this building is still somewhat a mystery and i'm fairly certain we are the only people to document this building, which is mad for me. This is my first real forum and I hope you enjoy the photos, Til the next one! "Take nothing but photos, leave nothing but footprints" 1. scouting a way in 2. The atrium, looking straight through 3. 4. 5. This tells me they were short of funds. 6. 7. The windows for the atrium 8. Lift mechanics 9. The lift motor and pulley system 10. Service history for the lift 11. A letter (with buildings address) for evaluation of the one lift 12. Typical office corridors, minus the health and safety hazard 13. Vintage mounted desk with plug sockets built in 14. Huge computer room 15. Keys still left as they were since closure 16. Media storage units 16. Hand drawn schematics for lift dated 89 17. Lift room 18. Temperature gauges 19. Wiring for the lift 20. Very rusty keys 21. The motor for the lift 22. Lift schematics 23. The original blueprint before the construction of oak house 24. This still works! 25. Flooring lifted for strip down before being abandoned 26. Old school floppy disk dated 91 27. Media room and units 28. Stannah lift lever 29. Inside the vast atrium 30. Another angle 31. Vintage clock and safe
  20. History Officially opened by the Earl of Scarborough in 1957, it was built the year before for £350,000 as headquarters for Leeds chemicals and dyestuffs firm Brotherton and Co and was at the heart of a new business area at the Westgate end of The Headrow. It was named in recognition of the famous Leeds city benefactor family, after the Brotherton Library and Collection at Leeds University, the Charles Brotherton engineering and chemical laboratory, the Brotherton Wing at the Leeds General Infirmary and the Brotherton Charity Trust. It was dubbed as the design of the future with the “latest external and internal structural techniques, automatic ventilation and ceiling heating”. Its ceilings were reported to be “acoustically perfect”, and its floors covered in highly-polished parquet. It was in 1965 – long before the merging of local police forces and the establishment of the current West Yorkshire force, that the old Leeds City Police took over part of the building and ultimately established its administrative headquarters there. In addition to the then Chief Constable and his Assistant Chief, numerous other police departments have been based at Brotherton House over the decades including senior CID, Special Branch, Fraud Squad, Regional Crime Squad, Firearms Registry, Aliens Department, Force Prosecutions, Special Constabulary, Training, Photographic and Fingerprint departments, the then so-called Policewomen’s Department, Pay and Accounts. Most notable investigations to have been carried out at Brotherton house was the notorious "Ripper squad" which was applied to a group of investigators and was the term used by the media for the investigation into the Yorkshire Ripper murders. Including George Oldfield the man in charge of the investigation. Today, the building – which has largely been vacated – overlooks the Leeds Inner Ring Road and is described by its agents as a “substantial high-profile office building with a significant presence.” Explore A day out in Leeds, driving on the ring road I noticed a building covered in green fabric... on closer inspection we found out by locals telling us that the building was abandon. Mostly the building is in good condition with a large amount of original features untouched.. the main hall is really something with original parquet flooring and a grand stair case leading into the main building. Corridors lead to open staircases on both sides of the building which offer access to the buildings six floors including rooftop. Pics 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. and 12 13. 14. 15. 16. and 17. LE FIN
  21. A revisit @ The Christallerie didnt have much time first visit ......... 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. If anyone can tell what the House Of Esher was going to be i would love to know visited with Critical Mass & Host 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. Cheers for looking Oldskool .........
  22. This is a classic mooch from a little while back, only never got around to actually reporting it anywhere! This site is now completely redeveloped, so no chance of future explores unfortunately HISTORY Stone House Hospital, formerly the City of London Lunatic Asylum, was a hospital and former mental illness treatment facility in Stone, near Dartford, Kent. The hospital has been closed since 2007 amd has since been under redevelopment into flats. Stone House was originally constructed between 1862 and 1866 at the behest of the London Commissioners in Lunacy to provide for pauper lunatics from the London area at a cost of £65,000. The buildings were designed in a Tudor Revival architecture style by James Bunstone Bunning, and the facility accommodated 220 patients. AERIAL VIEW THE EXPLORE - 14.3.2012 With a little pointer from a 'contact' we were able to enjoy an explore without too much interruption. The builders were obviously having a lay in, as it wasnt until after lunchtime that they started getting suspitious! By then we'd got most of our shots and made a stealthy retreat! THE PHOTOS THANKS FOR LOOKING!! And finally! Who can you spot left in the dust?!
  23. this house always interested me..the yard was filled with junk..old cars..and other junk..it gave the appearence of being abandoned but someone clearly lived there the area became prime real estate..mcmansions went up and taxes went up..i knew this houses wouldent last....i went by and saw it was finally empty the 1st floor was a neat gloomy house rooms that feel like a horror movie all the lights hung poorly..surpised there wasent a fir from them.. see more of that in a bit upstairs' the upstairs was nthing but an attic...no bedrooms or bathroom..this was a single floor home.. basement a wood burning heater...thats an old way to heat a house the last thing still hanging that shows the personality of the owner odd old stained glass not sure what that is... ..the dead and prarie home companion There are a few male voices caught inside one seems like another lanuage
  24. So this is my first post on this forum, I found out about these houses on a Abandoned Lincolnshire group on Facebook and thought they were definitely worth a trip, but... the first trip wasn't very successful, the address for these houses took us to two houses on the other side of Withcall that were at one point abandoned but have since been knocked down, so after about half an hour of looking around it became very clear the houses weren't there. After talking to the person who posted them originally and finding out the real location we headed back up to find them. We had to make sure we kept quiet as there is a neighbor attached to the 2nd station house and we weren't sure they'd have appreciated a night time visit from 3 explorers haha. Access to the house is easy, the doors being left open is always convenient. Walking around the houses only took 30 minutes or so , but was still a nice little explore. It's one of them places that besides a few repairs and some serious wallpapering, it looks like the family could just walk back through the front door and pick up their lives where they left off which gave the houses a real creepy vibe. I guess that's all that really needs to be said about these houses. Here's a few pictures: Thanks for reading:)
  25. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Little house somewhere in Belgium. Seems there lived an 103 year old lady and after a fire on the upper floor she left the house. Her son still comes there every week to feed the cat.
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