Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'ice'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • General Discussion & Forum information
    • Forum information
    • Just take a moment & say Hi
    • General Discussion
  • Exploration Forums
    • Military Sites
    • Industrial Locations
    • Hospitals & Asylums
    • Public buildings, Education & Leisure
    • Underground Explores
    • High Places
    • Manors, Mansions & Residential
    • Religious Sites
    • Anything Else
  • Other Forums
    • Video Reports
    • Short Reports
    • Themed Threads

Categories

  • About the Forum
  • Urban Exploring information
  • Photography and camera advice
  • Technical Help

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Website URL


Location


Interests

Found 7 results

  1. Ok the ice house opened 1900 closed 1990 ......NO ONE TOLD ME ABOUT THE DOME CAMERA ......... 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. Thanks for looking [email protected]@l..........
  2. Grimsby Ice Factory Visited with @EOA and @eastyham after our first stop was a failure and without a back up plan we were struggling so up to Grimsby it was. Good choice. Cracking place this. Old as fook, plenty of decay, rot, growth, shonky floors and endless amounts of pigeon poop. I walked across the bridge of doom but couldn’t really go much further as the floors and stairs are collapsing in the other building. It didn’t look too interesting anyway to be honest. Grabbed some old pictures off google so ive wanged them in here too because I think its proper mint when you can compare times gone by with the derps of today. History The Factory was opened on the 7th of October 1901 as a joint venture between the Grimsby Ice Company and the Grimsby Co-operative Ice Company. The Grimsby Ice Company was initially founded in 1863 by local fishermen to import ice from Norway to help them preserve the fish that they caught, by 1900 however it was obvious that they would have to begin to source ice from elsewhere as the for ice, what made matters worse was that the Norwegians began to charge more for exporting their ice and the supply of ice was unreliable... Hence the need for an ice factory at home. The Original Refrigeration Plant on site where 4 steam powered Pontifex horizontal double-acting ammonia compressors which would operate at 50rpm. These where powered by vertical, triple-expansion steam engines, the steam for these engines where generated from six 30ft long Lancashire boilers. A few changes where made between opening and 1931, changes such as the superheating of the Lancashire boilers and the purchase of a few more bits of kit from the Linde British Refrigerating Company however the majority of the facility stayed the same... Until 1931 when a modernization program under the direction of F A Fleming MBE, who was the General manger at the ice factory at the time was put into place. The program included the installation of four J&E Hall Compressors and Metropolitan Vickers Electrical equipment, replacing the Old Pontifex Compressors and Steam Engines. The specification for the new plant demanded an output of 1,100 tons of ice per day under ordinary working conditions, and by utilising the existing tanks without increasing the number of cans. The use of steam was to be entirely dispensed with and means to be provided for heating the thawing water without the use of electrical heaters. Much as today, this had to be achieved with equipment of the greatest efficiency. Sadly the high demands for ice where short lived, episodes such as the cod wars and the general decline in the British fishing industry led to several units been shut down by 1976, and in 1990 the factory closed it's doors and shut down. Today it is owned by Associated British Ports and is left derelict, although preservationists have tried to save the building, their efforts have sadly so far been in vain. Even though the place makes a great opportunity for us explorers I would like to think it would be saved eventually as the factory is now a unique survivor of a now otherwise extinct industry, that said, I do have my doubts... Pics I’ll start off with one from the depths of google. Two blokes looking rather proud next to one of the compressors. Not a clue of the date but it looks fairly clean and new. I didn’t take these pictures with the intention of getting them at similar angles and what not it was purely coincidence, but has worked ok ish. Looking at the same machine now A couple of control panels that were next to the above compressor Another oldie and the same machine now Looking down on the compressor hall and from the same walkway 1930ish? Moving onto other parts of the factory there was a room with these bins filling the whole floor. These were filled with water from the hoses at the end seen here Frozen. Then moved along on these cranes dumped at the end like this (this isn’t Grimsby) Then slid into the crusher So yeah. Unusual. I doubt I will ever explore another Ice factory so that’s pretty cool. Some more shots of the place. I’ll finish on a picture of the old steam powered compressors.
  3. The Grimsby Ice Factory is a historic former ice factory that was constructed from 1898–1901 to provide crushed ice to preserve fish stored in ships at Grimsby's seaport. The Factory engaged in operations up to 1990. The buildings still contain some of the original historic machinery from times of the operations' origins. During its time of prime operations, it produced 1,200 tonnes of ice daily. The building is 4,350 square metres in size, and at one time was the largest ice factory in the world. The structure and equipment at the Grimsby Ice Factory site is an important part of Grimsby's fishing heritage.It is a Grade 2 listed building that is presently owned by Associated British Ports.It has been stated that some of the most important and largest refrigeration machinery in the world exists there. The site is managed in part by the Great Grimsby Ice Factory Trust. As of May 2014, the trust has plans to restore and renovate the site into a leisure complex that would include a pub, cinema and climbing wall. Part of the trust's plan includes retaining the machinery on the site for historical purposes. In 2014, the trust attempted to obtain £11 million from the Heritage Lottery Fund, but the request was denied. In March 2015, Grimsby residents suggested that the factory be covered to hide it from view during the upcoming World Seafood Congress event in September, with the rationale that the deteriorating building could denigrate the town's image. Graeme Bassett, secretary of the Great Grimsby Ice Factory Trust, suggested that the building could be covered temporarily or that scaffolding could be erected as a solution regarding concerns about the site being an eyesore. Today its still an eyesore and the building and contents slowly rot away, what happens next is anyone's guess. Information taken from my friend wiki, On with the photos Hope you enjoy the report, Mr T
  4. This is a little mini-report more than anything After I was done around DC I headed off northwards to Baltimore to meet up with a contact I'd made on an American forum for the night. I arrived that evening and instead of us sitting around twiddling our thumbs he suggested we go out for a quick explore, now I don't normally like exploring in the dark but who was I to say no... It's fair to say this location isn't in the best part of Baltimore, indeed it's a wonder we didn't get shot or stabbed just for walking down the street! It was, as expected, very dark inside the factory and it is literally right on the street level with the pavement so very easy to attract attention to oneself but we got away with it. I tried to find history on the American Ice Co. but can't find too much, I'm led to believe they went hand-in-hand with the cold storage warehouses all over America. This one has seen better days but for a little mooch before I got into the really meaty locations it was fun. Thanks for looking
  5. Bristol Ice Rink (John Nike Leisuresport), Bristol Visited with some of the Bristol massive! A brief summery for you: Demolition has been approved. We've been looking at this one for a while now, and this time, for the first time, it would seem luck was on our side. After a long week, this was certainly a rewarding way to end it. Think what you want of it, some would say this isn't particularly interesting and just a massive derp, but personally I found it fascinating to see and completely worth it too. Having visited the rink a couple of times when I was younger, it brought back some vague memories. The place really is in a state, but then again it was in a state before it closed and indeed for the last however many years. That being said, the people of Bristol were still very unhappy at its closure. It did seem to be attracting a large amount of visitors still, which makes you question the closure further. There is some evidence here and there of it being a cinema in its previous years, but this is mostly gone. We also found what looks like an old night club, way up in the higher level, which looks like builders briefly moved in once, set up some lights and put some office desks around, then left. I didn't take any pictures up in those parts, as we didn't fancy having to pay parking fines so had to be off. That being said, there isn't too much of interest as it's all been fairly trashed. It was still interesting to see all that above the ice rink, a place where people mostly likely haven't been for years. An interesting read from a Bristolian talking about building when it held a nightclub and a cinema too. The rink from the front, years before closure: Snapz... s
  6. Well here it is; after the insane success of my not that remarkable report on Flamingos/Empire club (huge internet stats on Flickr) at the MK Leisure Plaza, and after I was unable to find a way in, I decided to give Planet Ice another go. I thought that after three weeks the whole lot would be gone, but a photo posted on the Facebook Group “Spotted: Milton Keynes” late last week; I was filled with some hope. From the A5 it was looking bleak. The side of the stripped out bowling club was there, well partly stripped, but it looked like not much remained behind that. When I arrived on the rainy morning to the Retail Park, I saw that pretty much all of Planet Ice remained; but unsure what. After a stroll in, I was certainly not disappointed! Everything was intact, though ancillaries were long gone. The place had an eerie feel to it, it was pretty dim inside and the half demolished building had all sorts of creaks and knocks in the wind. It felt incredible to be inside such a huge imposing sports centre, but also sad as it’s seemed such a waste to see all this equipment get destroyed. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Planet Ice opened along with the Plaza in 1990 as “The Bladerunner Arena”. The Plaza consisted of The Golden Flamingo Nightclub, Megabowl Tenpin and of course the ice rink itself and other various bars and shops such as Homebase and Argos as mentioned in The Empire report. The Bladerunner Arena had 3 licensed bars, one overlooking the ice and one down next to the rink, one within a one if its three function rooms and a restaurant. Other facilities included: an arcade, an ice sports shop, 8 changing rooms and of course; the ice pad itself. The arena regularly sold out during Kings Ice Hockey games which meant that custom was turned away. Several figure skating events and competitions also happened here through the years. The Owners, First Leisure, closed the arena in 1992 but were soon pushed into reopening it by public outcry. The Bladerunner went through another 2 closures, including a final one in 1996. The Ice rink was then mothballed, with local games taking place as far away as Peterborough and Oxford. Rumour has it that staff of the Plaza’s other businesses would go into the mothballed rink during breaks, using it as a large recreation area. The rink remained closed until 1998 when it came under new ownership, and was renamed “Planet Ice”. The Kings Hockey Team reformed in the third tier of English Ice Hockey under the ownership of a local businessmen. The arena was now being used by other hockey teams including: The London Knights Superleague Team. The changing rooms were converted into a luxury dressing room and also an office and gym. As the years went by, the 80s and 90s dream of having an all in one leisure complex dwindled, and Central Milton Keynes thrived. Everything became central so redevelopment of the Leisure Plaza was on the cards for many years. It was finally granted in March 2013. Planet Ice closed its doors on the 13th of July 2013 and is currently being demolished along with Megabowl, The Empire Club and the rest of the complex. A new rink will open in 2014. Many thanks to wiki for ALL of this information which I have used to write my own report. Planet Ice Milton Keynes - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Onto the photos, which sadly, many have noise :-/ Finally, check this old tin out! dated 1996! Empire/Flamingo Thread here: http://www.oblivionstate.com/forum/showthread.php/6123-The-Empire-Flamingos-MK-Leisure-Plaza-Milton-Keynes-Aug-2013 Thanks for reading, more at: http://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/sets/72157635543105465/
  7. Did anyone see coast a couple of weeks ago, a worker revisiting a abandoned ice factory in grimsby? has anyone been inside it looks great, here is a little video of it I found on internet. Interesting place. http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p017jcd5
×