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  1. I have been to Sculthorpe many times as it is local to me.but I have never ever seen the bomb stores in all my visits there.so seeing as I ain't been for a few years I thought I would try the bomb stores.situated over the other side I approached them from a different way.a long walk through fields and then I got to the fence,I thought I was going to have to give up,then I found a little gap.Whilst I was there I gave the control tower another look as I have only been in it the once.RAF Sculthorpe started off life as a satellite base to West Raynhasm in the second world war.after the war it had a total overhaul and in 1943 it was handed over too the US airforce.over the years all sorts of planes were based here.including B-45 bombers.capable of delivering nuclear warheads.these bombers was America's first deployment of planes since the second world war.Sculthorpe was known locally as quite a secretive base.a lot of plnaes use to come here what were not standard to the normal US airbases.the runway was one of the longest in Europe and was heated.it was said that the runway was one of the designated runways to take the space shuttle if it ran into trouble.the base was closed at the ed of the cold war.the domestic and technical sites were sold,the airfield side was retained and is used for training.I have been up there in the evening and seen the Americsan hercs flying low dropping parachutes, and occasionally landing the planes. The bomb stores were not as big as some I have visited as in amount of buildings.but I get the impression a lot of the buildings have been demolished over the years. Old warning signs around the perimeter fence. The tower you have to be a bit careful of getting this right as it is I the middle of the airfield so best to get a quiet weekend morning.the tower is only one of four built.one at Raynham which is being done up as a residential place,and a great job they are doing of it too.one is demolished.and the other is in use still. They even had there own bar in the tower. I found this building a little bit off distance from the tower what I had never bee in. Whilst iwas here I decided to give some of the other buildings a look.the comms and MP block,the two storey block,and three storey block,school and mess.sadly these are starting to look worse with a lot more graffiti than there ever was in them. Communications and MOD block, there is also a plotting room for operations inside and other briefing rooms. The Truman is a large three storey accommodation block for single personnel. It had phone booths and social room and shower blocks. he school and sergeants mess. which had a dining hall and social club and several accommodation rooms. There quite a few smaller blocks for accommodation too. These are just two storey and an S shape. The telephone exchange And finally one bit ihave not seen before either.the old base shop.it was located near the accommodation blocks and the housing estate.and would have served the families and personnel.it had been opened up again as a shop but without much luck it seems.
  2. Afternoon, Thought id upload a report from my visit to Wales in jan just gone. It was a freezing cold day and we had left early hours to get there before the rest of the tourbus turned up Heres some history from googles... The population of Cardiff had expanded greatly, from under 20,000 in 1851 to over 40,000 less than 20 years later. By 1890 there were 476 Cardiff residents "boarded out" in the Glamorgan Asylum, and a further 500 to 600 being held in hospitals as far away as Chester and Carmarthen.[2] Costing £350,000 and ten years to build, the Cardiff City Asylum opened on 15 April 1908. The main hospital building covered 5 acres (2.0 ha), designed to accommodate 750 patients across 10 wards, 5 each for men and women. Like many Victorian institutes, it was designed as a self-contained institute, with its own 150 feet (46 m) water tower atop a power house containing two Belliss and Morcom steam-engine powered electric generator sets, which were only removed from standby in the mid-1980s. The site also contained a farm, which provided both food supplies and therapeutic work for the patients.[2] The first medical superintendent was Dr Edwin Goodhall, whose then advanced approaches and therapies resulted in the hospital acquiring a reputation at the forefront of mental health care. Patients were also encouraged to take work and supervised tours outside the institute.[2] During the First World War, the facility was called the Welsh Metropolitan War Hospital.[3]During the Second World War, part of the hospital was turned over to the military, becoming the largest emergency service hospital in South Wales, treating British, American and German personnel. 200 beds were retained for civilian use, which enabled early treatment of post traumatic stress disorder of military patients.[2] On 5 July 1948, the hospital was taken over by the Ministry of Health as the National Health Service came into existence. After the introduction of Care in the Community in the early 1980s the hospital went into a period of decline and the number of resident patients reduced.[2] In November 2010 the Cardiff and Vale University Health Board decided that it was preferable to centralise all adult mental health care services at Llandough.[4] The hospital finally closed its doors in April 2016.[5][6] We had gotten in very easily and during our 6 hours or so there, did come across some other explorers, who had told us they had seen security walking around outside, however, we didnt see anyone at all, even from the top of the water tower we couldnt see anyone, happy days. I have heard of people getting caught here again recently though... On to some pics Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by [url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Whitchurch Hospital by [url=https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Whitchurch Hospital by Thanks for looking DJ
  3. History Beehive cotton spinning mills, comprising 2 spinning blocks with some ancillary buildings. The first mill (spinning mill No.1) was built in 1895, the second (spinning mill No.2) added in 1902. 2 spinning blocks with original offices and gate lodge, and later (c1920) office. Spinning mill No.1 is 5 storeys, with multi-ridge roof and cast-iron, steel and concrete internal structure. Brick externally. Large rectangular windows have central dividing mullions. Yellow brick bands as lintels. Stair/sprinkler tower at south-east angle raised an additional storey with high parapet. Stepped pyramidal cap now missing. Mill No.2 is similar in style, 6 storeys. Stair/sprinkler tower similar in style to that of mill No.1 at south-east angle, and additional smaller tower at north-west angle. Spinning mills are linked by loading bay, with mill name and date (1902). Engine house projects from the rear of mill No.1, and there is also a boiler house and truncated stack to rear. Several bays of single-storey, saw-tooth roofed building at front of mill No.2 - preparation or carding areas. INTERIOR: not inspected. HISTORY: documentary evidence suggests mill No.2 also formerly had engine house to centre-rear, and that there were card-room extensions to the rear of mill No.1. Explore Visited with @Ferret and @Drew howe good end to a good day having finally done St Joes earlier in the day. Just a good chilled mooch around a mahoosive set of mills, rooftop chills, winding scallies up, nearly falling into water tanks.
  4. Visited as the second site on mine and @Mooksters first Northern Road Trip of the year. We had failed several sites that day, and the day was coming to a rather murky and rainy end; but before we plumbed the hotel in for the night; we went to this short, sweet and rather destroyed church; the lone survivor of its time, sitting on its lonesome behind a Costa Coffee Drive Through and opposite a Travelodge Hotel. As we did a quick shoot of the inside; we could hear afternoon shoppers stopping by for their takeout coffee and cake fix making their orders over the drive through intercom. We even enjoyed a couple of cold drinks inside the shop after we came out of the church right next door! The building was put to tender in March 1869 with the stone-laying ceremony taking place on 21st July. The church, provided 550 sittings at a cost of £4,167 and was built of stone from the local Crosland Hill quarries. Initially the Clerk of Works was Mr Jonathan Parsons;subsequently succeeded by Mr Phillips. Consecration took place on 10th August 1880. The church was built by a local architect and protected by local laws from demolition and has remained empty since 2004 #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157679116734258/with/40308289993/
  5. So last year when I went to Coltishall the tower was locked, so a quick message from pretty vacant who was visiting it later said it was wide open. So I decided to nip down and see it for myself. Its fairly stripped off its features, but it does have some nice colours and its always nice to get in a tower. The ATC tower is a concrete one, and was built after the original one was bombed. It was extended during the cold war and contained offices, visual control room, a balloon room, airfield lighting controls and bedrooms for the meterological and control officer. Since the airfield closed in 2006 the tower has laid empty since. Quite away around the perimeter track is this tiny little building I found. its known a the B centre and worked in coordination with the A station, which would be controlled by the console in local control. the switched commands would would be sent from the console and converted to codes by the relay rack. These would then be sent by six pairs of telephone cables to the B centre. This would then allow the codes to be read and select the correct lights to be put on.
  6. Shot back in January; this explore formed part of a Northern Roadtrip with @Mookster. We had previously tried and failed at this place some time ago. It was nice to finally get inside this. We had several fails this weekend; but this was one of our successes. Slaithwaite had several local manufacturers in its local area; whom joined forces in 1887 to create the Globe Worsted Company; a textiles firm. They started out by building a large mill, which was typical of the era. The Globe Worsted Mills were built in two stages. The building of the first, Globe 1 began straight away in 1887 and was completed by the following year. It is thought that Glove 1 was built to a design possibly drawn up by local architect Thomas Varley of Slaithwaite. Globe 1 was 5 stories high and consisted of 33 bays. By 1889; the second phase, Globe 2 was built on the opposite side of the road; with an overhead walkway connecting the two buildings. Globe 2 was slightly different and had 5 stories plus a basement, and had 15 bays. The Globe Worsted company continued from strength to strength over the years, and like many other textile mills; it saw a gradual decline in trade towards the end of the 20th century. The company went into administration in 2004 and the mill closed later that year. The site has been sold to a private developer and a £30 million project is progress to renovate the buildings into a multi-use complex of public and business facilities. The chimney has been demolished as part of the works. Globe Mill 1 is slowly being converted into a pretty stunning looking development; hopefully this mill will follow in its footsteps. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157676959136467
  7. We all know the history of this place and with so many reports going up recently but here is a short version. Inspired by Tumbles i decided to shoot some old BW Film. History Costing £350,000 and ten years to build, the Cardiff City Asylum opened on 15 April 1908. The main hospital building covered 5 acres (2.0 ha), designed to accommodate 750 patients across 10 wards, 5 each for men and women. Like many Victorian institutes, it was designed as a self-contained institute, with its own 150 feet (46 m) water tower atop a power house containing two Belliss and Morcom steam engine powered electric generator sets, which were only removed from standby in the mid-1980s. Whitchurch Hospital finally closed its doors in April, 2016 and is due to be stripped down and dismantled. Thanks for looking
  8. Another explore from a massive backlog of explores! This one is from late January 2018; my first meeting with James Smith, having been talking on Facebook and Urbex Forums for practically ten years! Those who know me, know I have a love for older and retro vehicles. I had taken a drive to Derbyshire to pick up a spare Automatic Gearbox for my 1988 Volvo 240 as it was going cheaply and you never know! After collecting; I decided to give James a bell and he very kindly took me to some local sites! Permanite Asphalt was incorporated in 1989 and later became known as Ruberoid; part of the IKO Group. According to Companies House, they were dissolved on 2 September 2016. The pictured business in Matlock, manufactured Asphalt Products such as roofing sheets. It also involved the mixing of aggregate, bitumen and sand. Powdered limestone – which is still very much apparent, like a thick dust throughout the main tower. This Limestone was mixed with hot bitumen emulsion and poured into moulds before being left to cool. The site was regulated by the local Derbyshire Dales District Council on the following conditions: The heating of tar or bitumen is regulated under section 6.3 of the Environmental Permitting Regulations. The following activities are regulated as Part B processes: Heating, but not distilling, of tar or bitumen in connection with any manufacturing activity, or oxidising bitumen by blowing air through it, at plant where no other activities described in any Section in this Schedule are carried on. The undertaking of the activity must be likely to involve the use in any 12-month period of 5 or more tonnes of tar or bitumen or both in aggregate. Originally, the site was part of the larger Cawdor Quarry complex. It is suggested that the factory closed sometime around 2009 but information is pretty thin on the ground. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157690278494090
  9. Branston Pickle was made at this factory complex we see here in Burton Upon Trent, England 1920 and 1925 under Crosse & Blackwell and Rayon was produced here between 1927 and 1930. The history gets more interesting though; originally conceived and built as the rather grand, National Machine Gun Factory, it was completed in November 1918. Of course; by then, the First World War was over and the factory was obsolete! There was no need for the production of these weapons to begin! So Pickle ended up being made here for a few years! Come The Second World War; a major ordinance facility known as "The Branston Depot" was established here. This closed in 1961 and the operations moved down South to Bicester. Parts of the site were used up to about 1975, and bits have been demolished. Other parts house a B&Q Depot, and a workshop which converts and coach builds Police and Prison Vans. I apologise about the delay on this; it was shot back in New Year! I have been busy as always. The building is pretty bare and most of the cool, retro signage has been stolen. Not that I agree with it, but I suppose its better than it all being inevitably thrown away. The clock was what redeemed this place, and we gave it a wind and set the time. Viola. I bet that confused the locals! It looked as if it had been wound a few times in recent weeks. #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157692903424632
  10. Well whos idea was it to sort an explore after a urbex/hip hop xmas doo emmmmm ??? Got a txt of Cloaked Up at 7am ( i didnt get in bed till 1am) f**k off was my reply ....ohhh comon Oldskool if you dont come out Critical Mess will cry was his reply , so up i got up climbed into the back off his car and woke up outside our first location two hours later ;-( Now ill make no excuse for my wobbly photos or for the dust marks on the lens i could hardly stand up let alone operate a camera so here we go with Further Education 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Thanks for looking Oldskool .......
  11. Explored here a couple of weeks ago seems a bit destroyed now which is a shame bet it was a decent explore at one point. A bit of history, Royal Army Ordnance Corp (RAOC) Marchington, was built around 1957 and dealt with the supply and maintenance of weaponry and munitions and various other military equipment until 1993 when the Corp amalgamated with the Royal Logistics Corp. The site is now an industrial estate. It was also a Central Vehicle Depot during this time until the barracks closed in 1970, and the Territorial Army took over. Until it finally closed the site in the early 1980s. Marchington also housed the Armys fleet of Green Goddesses which came under the jurisdiction of the Office Of The Deputy Prime Minister (ODPM).The site is now an industrial estate. The Barracks lie bare and derelict and the married quaters have are all now private housing.
  12. Stoke Hospital Morgue. Been closed a fair while now, been here 3 times and never been able to gain access to this part of it due to it being locked off and being caught by secca once!
  13. HISTORY: Thanks for looking at my pictures, I hope you enjoyed them. Give my facebook page a like & follow if you want to see what else my friends and I get up too - 0151 Outdoors. E.
  14. Recent video of the beautiful example of what was the workhouse and Infirmary. On our first visit the seclusion rooms where visible now reduced to rubble.
  15. The old Coronation Street Film set is currently sat, abandoned , waiting demolition. This video shows an explore of the purpose built film set at Granada Studios in Manchester. Although this wasn't the very first film set at the studio it's one of the most well known and remembered amongst fans of the popular soap. The TV show's production was filmed at this location for over 30 years until it was sold to Manchester Quays Its in 2013 to be demolished and replaced with flats, offices, restaurants and hotels.
  16. History Barbour Mill has a long and prestigious history in Lisburn and as the end of an era draws near many local people will be recalling their own memories of Barbour Threads. In 1784 John Barbour, who hailed from Scotland, established a linen thread works in Lisburn. At the same time his son, William, bought a derelict bleach green at Hilden and set up business. Later, the thread works were transferred to Hilden and as early as 1817 it was employing 122 workers. In 1823 William Barbour bought a former bleach mill at Hilden and built a water-powered twisting mill. The Linen Thread Company was founded 1898 and it quickly became a large international company. In fact it became the largest linen thread mill in the world, giving Lisburn a richly deserved international reputation. By 1914 it employed about 2,000 people and until recently some 300 workers were still employed there, with the work- force dropping to just 85 in recent years. Among the company's varied products were nets, which could be made into snares and fishing nets. The company built a model village for its workforce in Hilden, which consisted of 350 houses, two schools, a community hall, children's playground and village sports ground. Lisburn became the envy of the world thanks to its Linen and Thread industry and now the last remnant of that history is to close its doors for the last time. The Explore Although I think we were about 6 years too late with this one. This was somewhere I have wanted to go for quite some time but with other commitments and other places to explore while in NI it always got shoved to the back seat. This trip we finally got to go, explored with @hamtagger we had quite a leisurely stroll round this one. The first thing I noticed when getting close was how it was becoming crowded with new housing and developments. Still, it sits proud within its place. A bit of the site has already been demolished. The place is bloody massive! It is easiest the biggest site I have been to. Spending numerous hours there and still not getting around the whole site led us to leave before darkness fell. The architecture was pretty impressive with the stonework and iron gables or whatever you call them. Surprisingly, despite being closed several years and falling victim to vandalism, graffiti & metal theft it still has so much to offer. There were little cupboards dotted about in most sections with linen/ thread materials. Loads of hand painted signs that were of little importance but I like stuff like that. The decay was pretty cool and I loved how trees were growing out of the top floors. Nature really was reclaiming it. A few of the ceilings had fallen in with those areas a bit more decayed than others. Right on to the pics The whole site (not my pic) Some old advertising material I found online 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 (I swear this hasn't been edited at all!) 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Thanks for looking!
  17. History Officially opened by the Earl of Scarborough in 1957, it was built the year before for £350,000 as headquarters for Leeds chemicals and dyestuffs firm Brotherton and Co and was at the heart of a new business area at the Westgate end of The Headrow. It was named in recognition of the famous Leeds city benefactor family, after the Brotherton Library and Collection at Leeds University, the Charles Brotherton engineering and chemical laboratory, the Brotherton Wing at the Leeds General Infirmary and the Brotherton Charity Trust. It was dubbed as the design of the future with the “latest external and internal structural techniques, automatic ventilation and ceiling heating”. Its ceilings were reported to be “acoustically perfect”, and its floors covered in highly-polished parquet. It was in 1965 – long before the merging of local police forces and the establishment of the current West Yorkshire force, that the old Leeds City Police took over part of the building and ultimately established its administrative headquarters there. In addition to the then Chief Constable and his Assistant Chief, numerous other police departments have been based at Brotherton House over the decades including senior CID, Special Branch, Fraud Squad, Regional Crime Squad, Firearms Registry, Aliens Department, Force Prosecutions, Special Constabulary, Training, Photographic and Fingerprint departments, the then so-called Policewomen’s Department, Pay and Accounts. Most notable investigations to have been carried out at Brotherton house was the notorious "Ripper squad" which was applied to a group of investigators and was the term used by the media for the investigation into the Yorkshire Ripper murders. Including George Oldfield the man in charge of the investigation. Today, the building – which has largely been vacated – overlooks the Leeds Inner Ring Road and is described by its agents as a “substantial high-profile office building with a significant presence.” Explore A day out in Leeds, driving on the ring road I noticed a building covered in green fabric... on closer inspection we found out by locals telling us that the building was abandon. Mostly the building is in good condition with a large amount of original features untouched.. the main hall is really something with original parquet flooring and a grand stair case leading into the main building. Corridors lead to open staircases on both sides of the building which offer access to the buildings six floors including rooftop. Pics 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. and 12 13. 14. 15. 16. and 17. LE FIN
  18. Thought I had little excuse but to have a look around this one, it's practically in my back garden. Had the dog with me so couldn't venture past heras etc. Will stick a proper report up when I have a full look. Main Colliery Headstock And rolling stock This is actually from the main railway in coalville, which was transported to the mine when it closed to preserve it. A barge, not sure why that's there! Will try and get back soon and see what else I can get. ?
  19. Nice place this! Visited with Fortknox0 Maniac Wevsky Obscurity and i cant remember for the life of me who else lol. Shame things have changed now as bits are cleared out... Thanks for looking!
  20. I thought now would be a good time to kick off 2015 with my first report of the year After countless trips around the UK to visit various mines and quarries, it begged the question as to what is located closer to home as there must have been mining activity around Kent. Throughout the area there are extensive underground coal mines and their history is well documented with some of the topside sites now sitting abandoned. All coal mines were capped to prevent access and with obvious hazards like gases and lack of oxygen, these locations are not accessible nor are we able to explore them without some serious kit and knowledge of the risks associated. I have spent much time this year researching and searching for mines and quarries in Kent which may still be existent below our feet. Which is what leads me to this place. I started to find reference to chalk, sandstone, and ragstone workings across Kent although they are few and far between. Some years ago we had managed to successfully locate and explore an abandoned chalk mine at Manston and another much larger chalk mine at Eastry (both of which I believe have been reported on). Next I began to research the old ragstone workings located in Westerham and with various members and repeat trips we managed to explore most of the main workings. Next we moved into North Kent where I had been researching another large chalk mine, again we successfully gained entry and posted a report here. I am sure that there is more to be found with regard to mining activity in Kent although for me there was one last major piece of the puzzle. A sandstone mine based in Medway was the target. For years there had been talk of a set of tunnels based under Medway and there was even discussions on the forums about these tunnels that seemed to have disappeared with no trace. Although I had always been aware there was something there and had discussions with other explorers over the years, I had never put any real effort into finding them. I began to research the rumored tunnels and found a few interesting leads to investigate. I travelled up to Medway with a non-member Trav a couple of times and spent hours searching the area for any trace of an entrance to the underground workings. Eventually we had what we needed and made our way home to devise a plan. A few weeks later we returned to explore the underground workings and after a small amount of digging we managed to gain access. The last documented access to the mine was in the early 90’s although there was evidence that people have got in there since then due to graffiti in different areas and rubbish left lying around. Despite this we know that the place has not been accessed for a good few years and has almost become completely forgotten and lost. For those of you that don’t know any of the history:- Kent is not particularly well-endowed with underground stone quarries but ragstone was worked as a building material, at least since Roman times, and is used extensively throughout the county. In 1990 Kent Underground Research Group) got permission from Maidstone Borough Council to re-open the ragstone quarries in Mote Park. Maidstone, like East Surrey, has its legendary tunnels that run for improbable distances between impossible locations, which suggests the likelihood of substantial underground workings existing somewhere. The Mote Park quarries were sealed with a huge quantity of rubble and hardcore in the 1960s. The idea was to excavate the rubble out of the fissure until the expected open gallery was reached. The fissure had draughted strongly during digging operations, suggesting open passage existed not far away from the digging front. Access was finally gained on August 26th and what was seen were in many ways similar to the firestone workings in Surrey. There were probably about 1000 metres of passage, though not all of the mine was explored. It will be interesting to see how the workings compare with the East Surrey firestone quarries. Firestone was widely used for carvings and reasonably intricate decorative work in buildings such as churches. Ragstone was more often a basic building material, and did not usually lend itself to more than simple shaping, and was certainly not used for fine work to any real extent. Once inside the workings it was easy to see why the mine had been sealed years ago as we found it to be quite unstable and so we had to carefully navigate our way through crawl spaces without disturbing any unstable sections. After about 10minutes of crawling through tight gaps and over dead’s then we reached the main haulage route which was a lot larger in size and had been built up with walls of dead rocks to either side. I have now returned to the mine a number of times with various members in order to push on and explore all of the workings. I am confident that we have now covered the whole system and although there is little in the form of miner’s tools, rails, etc. We did find some large fossils, wooden props supporting the roof and natural fissures which were all nice to see and definitely made the explore worthwhile. Again, it just goes to show how rewarding this hobby can be when you put in the effort, research and persistence. Massive respect to Trav (non-member) for all the efforts he put into this one with me as he was on the case from the moment I mentioned the place, and to Hermy for helping us get in. Finally….here are some pictures for you to enjoy….
  21. I like graffiti and ever since I saw this place I wanted to pay it a visit, it was second on my list for the day and I was alone. I parked up and found a way in, I could hear a generator and see a cabin on one side, so I went in a different direction. After about half hour I walked out of a building and straight in front of secco. He looked at me and ambled up while I walked down to him, he didn't say anything so I told him what I was doing and asked if he minded if I carried on. He asked how I got in and if there was anyone with me, I told him, he asked how long I wanted I told him and he said I could as long as I didn't go anywhere stupid. They have cleared between the buildings and he said they will be down in 3/4 weeks, so it looks like I got there in time. As I was squeezing through my exit point I was face with a couple of coppers, they asked what I had been doing and ask if I knew I was trespassing, I told them that I had spoke to the secco and they were happy. They were looking for some young kids and asked if I had seen any, when I said no they just walked back to their car. As I said, I did take some photos of the buildings but the graffiti was the main subject. full set here http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/sets/72157640154562644/ Thanks for looking
  22. Something a little bit different this time, been here a few times now and the view still takes my breathe away. Its great to have something like this so close to home and as an added bonus the security guard turned up just as we were leaving which saved us a climb The recent fire there hasn't really done much damage to the inside but there is nothing really worth seeing in there hence the lack of photos but please enjoy. Thanks guys !!!!!
  23. This isn't really a good report but not much gets posted about these caverns I went here in January 15 it's quite close by to me. But only went armed with my iPhone and a torch. This report is more about the tales and myths that surround these caves. I did go down in to the caves but not to far as was on my own in there and didn't want to get lost or anything so only a few externals I'm afraid. But hoping to get back there soon. So here's a bit of history and a couple of pics... The small village of Crank close to Rainford in Merseyside is not the sort of place where you would expect to encounter a vast underground man made cave system, however this little known strange place does exist and many legends are attached to this disturbing place Four children decided to explore the limestone caverns in the area and vanished. One child survived and told a terrifying tale about small old men with beards who killed his three friends and chased him. The petrified child stumbled over human bones in the caves and finally managed to scramble through an opening to the surface as a hand was grabbing at his ankle. The authorities were concerned because a number of people had gone missing in the area near the cave entrances. Two heavily armed soldiers descended into the caverns with torches and claimed that they not only found a heap of human bones, they also found the ruins of an ancient church of some unknown denomination. The interior of the church was lit by three large candles and grotesque gargoyles formed part of an altar. Throughout the exploration of the underground, the soldiers said they felt as if they were being watched, and also heard voices speaking in an unknown language. One report said that a child's head was found in a cave, along with evidence of cannibalism. After a second investigation, the caves either collapsed or gunpowder was used to seal them, and so the riddle of the underground church of Billinge remains unsolved. The caverns are actually the remains of the Rainford Delph Quarry. in which mining ceased in 1865. The surrounding woods and caverns were later used as a game reserve by the Earl of Derby, and in the WW2 they became a storage facility for ammunition for the Anti Aircraft position at Crank. The Caverns are said to have tunnels leading to them from some of the buildings in the Village, one use was for the Catholic priests to escape from the Parliamentarians/Cromwell̢۪s soliders.At this time Catholic priests were being killed and were banned from saying mass, so they had to practice mass in private at places such as Birchley Hall, tunnels from the hall are said to lead to the caverns. The main caverns are fairly new compared to the main tunnel system which starts at the mousey, Level 1 was for mining-nothing else, although one passage which streches to the 12 yarder does connect with the original level 2 main system. Level 2 was there first, this was a large network of tunnels leading to many known places in the St Helens area including the Stork Hotel Billinge, Lowe House Church, Carrmill area, St Aidens Church Billinge etc. The tunnels also run under a lot of the Pubs in the Billinge area, not all of them have entrances, but i believe the tunnel network under the Billinge arms (George and Dragon) may hide a dark secret. The Stork Inn in the village of Billinge located 2-3 miles from the cave entrance and where one of the tunnels is said to have connected with the cellar some time in the past.There is a story that the Church was once above ground, but due to part of the Cavern̢۪s tunnels collapsing, the Church sunk into the ground and fell inside the caverns.
  24. Hey everyone:D History..A classic example of a country estate with buildings and a designed landscape forming an integral composition reflecting late C19 taste. Minley Manor and its pleasure grounds laid out by Robert T Veitch and his landscaper F W Meyer in the 1880s form the centrepiece to the estate. This followed an earlier phase of planting undertaken by James Veitch in the 1860s. The western half of the estate is criss-crossed by a network of drives and tracks radiating from Fleet Lodge, one of which leads to Home Farm (a model farm built to the design of Arthur Castings in 1900) situated 500m south-east of the Manor. I visited here a little while back with a non-member, but had an awesome morning here - not tonnes of stuff left as rotten floorboards put some places off limits, but definitely a nice little explore. anyhow, on with some pictures.. (apologies if this is in the wrong category - only put it here as i thought it might come under manors/residential:D) These are some of my earliest urbex pictures, and in my opinion could be improved massively - not my best set, but thanks for looking nonetheless
  25. Some History Grade II-listed Overstone Hall/House, on the outskirts of Northampton, has stood as a part ruin after it was largely gutted by a fire, which broke out on April 16, 2001. Overstone Hall was designed in 1860 for Lord and Lady Overstone by William Milford Teulon but it took so long to build that Lady Overstone died before it was completed. For its time, Overstone Hall was highly advanced, built with double walls, giving it the earliest known cavity wall insulation. It also had a central heating system called Mr Price’s Apparatus, gas lighting and a butler’s lift. In the early 20th century it was rented by a shipping magnate who entertained lavishly, the house passed through various owners until the mansion, with 70 acres, was sold in 1929 for conversion into a girls’ boarding school. In 1979 the school closed and a year later, it was bought by current vendors the New Testament Church of God for £100,000. The Visit I had a couple of hours free one morning so decided to go here after seeing it on another UE forum. It's only 5-10 mins from where I live. The Hall is surrounded by a 8ft high fence with no obvious points of entry. Surprisingly, part of the Hall is actually still in use as a homeless shelter. There were dog walkers and golfers about, but no one seemed to care that I was wandering the grounds. Inside, half of the Hall has been completely destroyed internally, and only the outside walls remain. The other half has deteriorated pretty bad but has usable stairs and flooring. Even with only half of the Hall remaining, it is a huge building. It would have had 2 or 3 floors, but I was only able to access the ground and first floor safely. Parts of the inside have been destroyed by fire and there are parts where there isn't much floor left. It is kind of sad to see such a grand building left to decay, but it makes for a good explore! I spent about an hour inside, and briefly got lost in the rooms going round in circles!
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