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  1. In early 2018 we visited one of the new tunnels of Paris metro which for the moment (May 2018) is still under construction. Recently I was told that this place is no longer accessible due to active works that doesn't stop even at night, so I will publish some pictures. Btw, we managed to get in only from the 2nd try - there is a security guy walking around the construction site (on the street). The new tunnel is 2km long. We walked till the end and on the way back checked out the end of the active line. There were two trains. Soon we heard some noise (like if someone'd open a door) and left the place.
  2. Bretton Hall Gymnasium The history A teacher training college founded by Alec Clegg. The collage boasted in the design and the architecture of the veroius 'new' buildings scattered around the collage campus including the Gymnasium and the student centre. The collage merged with the University of Leeds in August 2001. Most of the music, fine art and teacher training courses were moved to the Leeds campus, but visual and performing arts education and creative writing remained at the Bretton site, which became home to the University's School of Performance and Cultural Industries. The Gymnasium also stayed but later became disused. The building now is a showdow of its former glory. The explore Ive always fancied to have a look around this building and never got the chance too... until recently. Its quite an unusual looking building but that said it would make a very nice modern Gym. Entry was fairly easy if you have common sense, and its nice to get out with a new member. Theres not much really else to say about this building... just watch out for the tourist who don't share the same interest as you when it comes to abandonment. The pictures @SILVERSKULL2004 if your still on the forum nice meeting you and a good mooch that... Cheers for reading I know it's a bit of a small one but o'well LBE
  3. Sheffield Old Town Hall stands on Waingate in central Sheffield, England, opposite Castle Market. The building was commissioned to replace Sheffield's first town hall, which had opened in 1700 to a design by William Renny. This first structure stood by the parish church, on a site with little prospect for extension. The Old Town Hall was built in 1807-8 by Charles Watson, and was designed to house not only the Town Trustees but also the Petty and Quarter Sessions. The initial building was a five-bay structure fronting Castle Street, but it was extended in 1833 and again in 1866, the most prominent feature was the new central clock tower over a new main entrance that reoriented the building to Waingate. At the same time, the building's courtrooms were linked by underground passages to the neighbouring Sheffield Police Offices. By the 1890s, the building had again become too small, and the current Sheffield Town Hall was built further south. The Old Town Hall was again extended in 1896-7 and became Sheffield Crown Court and Sheffield High Court. In the 1990s, these courts moved to new premises, and since at least 1997 to present, the building remains disused.
  4. Hi, this is my first report, I don't really know what to write but here goes....... Unless you have been on Mars or in a coma for the past couple of weeks you would most probably have heard about this Manor House. Some pictures were posted & the guys who posted them had pretty much made it crystal that they were not going to be sharing its location. The post stated that they hoped that people would forget about it & that it would be saved. Or to put it another way - they threw the gauntlet down big time and by doing that it had made it the UK’s most hunted derp within the UE community, and surprise surprise within a day it had been found by more than one person. The actual post & chats that I had with them gave me a couple of very good clues & to be fair to the guys when I told them that I had it they did clue me up with everything I needed to know. Anyway, It just so happened that I was in the area with some free time on the Wednesday so I popped along. I got there before sun up & had the house to myself for a couple of hours, it was a pretty much ad hoc visit & quickly realised that I needed a wider lens, I knew some guys were planning to hit it on the Saturday & decided a revisit was in order. Messages were sent & arrangements were made for the pre-Sun up meet, I’d gotten wind that there may be a few people there so I was not surprised to see a few other faces when I opened the door at around 7am. The pre-dawn light, or rather lack of it meant that we all sat around having a chat & a schmoke as more & more people turned up out of the darkness. I didn’t count but I’m told that at 08:30 there were 21 of us in the house and that the snack bar had ran out of breakfast rolls & that pin badges & t shirt sales were through the roof. The 19th century house itself is on a massive estate and parts of the estate are live & lived in. There are 2 floors & a basement, the house has some lovely features, the stairs, the swimming pool & indoor courtyard & there’s plenty to spend a couple of hours there photographing. The basement is quite big & has a drive in access point & (GoonTube Click bait warning time) has a FERKIN PANZER TANK in one of the rooms, that’s the headlines and that’s what the Goons will be selling it as but the reality is that it is a home made & nowhere near finished & is made of wood. A bit meh for me tbh. Just outside the house there is a BMW parked half in a bush. The house is ok, the features are great but there’s more to be offered from this site. There’s numerous buildings to visit & as soon as I had shoot the last bits I wanted to shoot myself, Paul & Curt went off to see what we could find, there were some ruins , out buildings & a pyramid near the house that looked cool & as we were walking through the woods we could hear the familiar sound of guns being shot in the not too far distance. We had a bit of a scout around & found the ‘hunters’ in an adjacent field. Now if this was a GoonTube video we’d have become the ‘hunted’ but as this is real life we just ignored them & went the other way. One of our goals was the indoor Tennis courts, this was pretty hard to miss once you got near it. We opened the door & were amazed, yeah it was a tennis court, but it’s last use had been as a venue to watch the Football World Cup on a projector screen, there was a bar set up & every nations flag was hanging up & bunting all over the place, we found a large number of pint glasses depicting the “World Cup 1996” so it appears that it was the last time the courts had been used other than for a bit of storage. TBH it was quite trashy but among the trash we found (click bait warning) a HUMAN SKELETON!! And what you going to do with a skull on a explore? Yep, put glasses on it & a fag in its mouth, named him Dr McCoy and take some pictures. What... you wouldn’t... yeah I know, Exploring is a serious business but I like to have a laugh too while I’m out visiting. We were in the tennis courts for quite some time before going to the wood sheds & then the boat house. The boat house was the main thing on my hit list & it was ok, I was setting up to shoot & among the sounds of gun shots ringing out we heard someone shouting “YOU IN THE WOODS!! STAY STILL!!” so we done what any self respecting Umbexer would do & we bailed back through the wood to the soundtrack of “STAY THERE!” & gunshots. As we were running I got my foot caught and I went down like I’d been shot, Paul & Curt were worried & frantic, and by worried & frantic I mean pissing themselves laughing, I don’t know if it was a dream or not but I’m sure I heard Paul say “what the fuck are you doing on the floor, get up!” and as I got up I could see that we’d run into the guy who was shouting at us. “What you doing on my land?” the ruddy faced man shouted, “We’re photographing the Red Kites” I replied & he told us to go over the fence & “gerroff moi land” & we left. Well, that was my first report, probably my last too :-
  5. This development is about half an hour from my home in Sharm..never realised it was totally abandoned so only had a look round the outsides but I will return...bit of history for yous: A most ambitious hotel this..a former Five star hotel complex comprising of three hotels,Moon,Star and Sun.Raouf gifted this hotel to his american wife who managed and used her artistic touch to decorate the place.The complex comprised a dozen pools,a casino and cinemas,however,there seemed initially that the business was a success but bookings dropped off and eventually the Moon hotel closed followed by Star then the Sun..now,the beach lies abandoned with parasol umbrellas and sunbeds piled up near a beach bar and the entire complex is now abandoned..even the locals give it a wide berth for some strange reason. Only a few pics of interest so....this is the state of the beach No longer busy Pool bar with quite a view. This water ride ran between two hotels Pretty impressive pool Massage anyone? If nothing else,I have brought a few sunny pics to your shore!
  6. The George Hotel as stood empty for just a little over 5 years... considering this it's not half bad inside, stairways are still intact, few if any holes through to other floors, little decay in the form of mold or interior fatigue and there's still gas in the pumps in the bar area. It's a fair size and took us over an hour to appreciate some of the victorian features still visible throughout the building. The building was sold a few years back to a local dentist for £900,000 but nothing if anything as started interns of building works to restore the hotel. which is a shame as the Hotel sits in pleasant surroundings within St George square which recently received a £21 million facelift. The Hotel as a basement area which stores the cask ales & equipment needed to run the Hotel bar. Theres rooms a plenty 60 rooms accommodation with bar(s) , ballroom, pool hall and dining room & rooftop area ... we pretty much covered the entire building in a typically dreary Huddersfield afternoon. Hope you enjoy the thread... Exterior Bar Main lobby Stair case shots Corridor shots Bed rooms The caller The ball room and dinning hall The kitchen The roof Other rooms 45 pics later... Hope you enjoyed...
  7. Visited with clarexplres and cheers for the heads up from Black Shuck a few months ago.... But as usual I only just got round to this nice post now. An hours drive and walking up the wrong side of the field to try and find the ROC post to start off with and eventually we were on our way in This was the 1st time I had been in a ROC Post and actually felt how cramped it must have been down there. With stuff strewn everywhere you could hardly more. This site is listed as locked on the Outdated Subrit site and you can see from the images it has not just been opened up recently either.... So get out there checking other ones folks. This particular post opened March 1958 and closed September 1991 What are they Royal Observer Corps Monitoring Posts are underground structures all over the United Kingdom, constructed as a result of the Corps' nuclear reporting role and operated by volunteers during the Cold War between 1955 and 1991. In all but a very few instances the posts were built to a standard design consisting of a 14-foot-deep access shaft, a toilet/store and a monitoring room. The most unusual post was the non-standard one constructed in a cellar within Windsor Castle. Almost half of the total number of posts were closed in 1968 during a reorganisation and major contraction of the ROC. Several others closed over the next 40 years as a result of structural difficulties i.e. persistent flooding, or regular vandalism. The remainder of the posts were closed in 1991 when the majority of the ROC was stood down following the break-up of the Communist Bloc. Many have been demolished or adapted to other uses but the majority still exist, although in a derelict condition. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 We could have had some serious fun if this was still there 12 13 14 15
  8. Former puppy farm that was often in the local news regarding poor living quarters,alleged mistreatment of dogs and the selling of dogs that often died after new owners took delivery of the young animals..the RSPCA were always closing down the business,but the owner John Lowe simply ignored them and carried on. On February 23rd 2014,Mr Lowe,who purchased Keepers Cottage in 1966,shot and killed his partner and then her daughter,who tried to flee and get help,but died just outside the cottage.Police arrived and arrested Mr Lowe who was found guilty of double murder later that year and jailed for life with a minimum tariff of 25 years so it is likely he will die in prison.From information on several estate agents websites,it seems the 6 acre estate has been sold but last year planning permission was refused for one plan to demolish the cottage and build 3 dwellings so as of January 2018,I have no idea what will happen.We arrived at dawn and immediately noticed red flashing cameras mounted firstly at the gated entrance then further down the track mounted on a telegraph pole and one fixed on the cottage all flashing busily.We were considering retreating however we decided to skirt round the outbuildings to escape the cameras if indeed that is what they are and not dummy alarms which I suspect they are...I have to say I found this explore both intriguing but disturbing at the same time and was glad to leave..I have not felt this way since exploring Cane Hill Asylum in 2008. My pics are only phone shots so please excuse.. Found this on Google Earth to show how haphazard this place is/was We arrive as the sun is filtering through the trees..this cottage sits within a six acre plot nicely hidden by the woods. The farm is surrounded by shanty type buildings largely held together with telegraph poles. Truly awful animal pens..I cannot imagine this was any better before the old man`s conviction. We skirt round the rear of the house avoiding the cameras Amphitheatre style seating/steps. Living room..very surprised to see that this fire place didnt seem to have been used for open fires. View from the master bedroom. And the enormous conservatory built round two elevations. I am glad I saw all this but upon exiting the house,some strange bleeping noise started so it was our excuse to leave!
  9. Another local one that I've been wanting to do for ages, but never got round to it until now. It's filled full of asbestos, so I made sure to bring my good PP3 mask, but even that wasn't enough probably. History During World War 2, the Southern Railway took over the Deepdene Hotel near Dorking in Surrey for its wartime emergency headquarters. In the grounds they excavated an underground control centre taking advantage of a network of existing natural caves that had been acknowledged 300 years before in the diaries of John Evelyn. Because of the natural protection afforded by the location of the caves they were eminently suitable for the development of a bunker to house both the headquarters' telephone exchange and Traffic Control who also had their underground control centre there with underground divisional controls at Woking (South West Division), Southampton (Western Division), Orpington (South Eastern Division) and Redhill (Central Division) The Explore I got a message in the morning saying it's doable and to go soon. So a few hours later I was there and inside. I'd been meaning to do this one for a long time now, especially as its pretty local, so now was a good a time as any. It's actually not a very large bunker, but its nice for its modest size. The infamous 100 steps lived up to its reputation as terrifying. I only went up a few steps, but that's enough. I actually bumped into another explorer here who got the fright of his life as I turned the corner and shown my light at him in a moment of confusion and panic. Turned out to be someone else who got the memo and took a trip down to see it from a little further afield. A nice little bunker, rich full of history. Photos
  10. This is a spectacular location for sure, surrounded by wonderful dramatic coastline. If you've got time I'd recommend bringing a packed lunch!! You could be watching the waves crash against the rugged cliffs, maybe if you're lucky you might spot a seal or a puffin passing by. Here in 1951 plans were set up to build a plant which would extract bromine from sea water and by adding sulphuric acid would then create liquid bromine. The bromine was then reacted with ethylene to produce Dibromoethane which was a key component of leaded petrol. With the phasing out of leaded petrol in the 1990's the plant diversified into other bromine chemicals. Production finally stopped altogether in March 2004. Many of the buildings have been demolished but there was enough standing to make this high on my wish list - plenty of natural decay and lots of interesting stuff left on site. Its been fairly undisturbed due to a combination of its remote location, CCTV and onsite security. Sadly though a recent fire has badly damaged one of the buildings (not quite sure which one). The photos in this report are a compilation. I had to make a return visit because the first time I somehow missed the conference room and the main attraction for me - the medical area. I really like how much variety there is, hence why there's quite a few pics
  11. A recent visit to this old Power Station which has been decommissioned since 2000. A planning application has been approved to demolish it and replace it with a new sustainable energy plant. Although approval was granted in 2012 nothing seems to have happened since. Lots of stuff left in situ and it's all decaying nicely. Some pictures #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15
  12. This was not only a house but also a atelier carpets and antiques. It is a villa very strange... a part old-style and a part, perhaps renovated, very modern. Welcome to Villa K.
  13. Finally got to visit the place that sparked my addiction to these places and it was worth the wait! after unintentionally using some other lads we bumped into as bait for the secca we made our way round the endless corridors like headless chickens trying to decide which way to go and after just short of 2 hours we walked straight into security! probably the most friendly I've bumped into yet and nicely pointed out the best bits on our long walk out, all of which we missed ! Apologies if the fish-eye is too much pics shot from my gopro! The History Severalls Hospital in Colchester, Essex, UK was a psychiatric hospital built in 1910 and opened in May 1913. The 300-acre (1.2 km2) site housed some 2000 patients and was based on a plan whereby wards, offices and services were within easy reach of each other by a network of interconnecting corridors. This meant that staff were able to operate around the site without the need to go outside in bad weather. Patients in Severalls were separated according to their gender. Villas were constructed around the main hospital building as accommodation blocks between in the years after its opening. Psychiatrists were free to experiment with new treatments on patients seemingly at will, using practices now considered unsuitable such as electro-convulsive therapy (ECT) and the use of frontal lobotomy.. A change in management during the 1960s (and likely a change in social acceptances) saw reforms introduced including the creation of art and music therapy programs and the widespread use of drugs and medication. The hospital closed as a psychiatric hospital in the early 1990s following the closure of other psychiatric institutions. However, a small section remained open until 20 March 1997 for the treatment of elderly patients suffering from the effects of serious stroke, etc., as a temporary building for nearby Colchester General Hospita Thanks for looking
  14. SEVERALLS HOSPITAL - DECEMBER 2014 Severalls Hospital history The 300-acre (1.2 km2) site housed some 2000 patients and was based on the "Echelon plan" - a specific arrangement of wards, offices and services within easy reach of each other by a network of interconnecting corridors. This meant that staff were able to operate around the site without the need to go outside in bad weather. Unlike modern British hospitals, patients in Severalls were separated according to their gender. Villas were constructed around the main hospital building as accommodation blocks between 1910 and 1935. Most of the buildings are in the Queen Anne style, with few architectural embellishments, typical of the Edwardian period. The most ornate buildings are the Administration Building, Larch House and Severalls House (originally the Medical Superintendent's residence). The hospital closed as a psychiatric hospital in the early 1990's following the closure of other psychiatric institutions. However, a small section remained open until 20 March 1997 for the treatment of elderly patients suffering from the effects of serious stroke, as a temporary building for the nearby Colchester General Hospital which was in the process of building an entire new building for these patients. Since 1997 the remaining structures have changed little. Architecturally the site remains an excellent example of a specific asylum plan. However, the buildings have suffered greatly from vandalism. In 2005 the main hall was subjected to an arson attack and in 2007 the charred building was demolished for safety reasons. The five boilers were removed from the central boiler house in 2007. In 2008 the sale of the hospital site, including its extensive grounds, collapsed due to the slow-down in the building industry. Planning permission was however granted in 2011 to redevelop the site. Today Building work is now up to the perimeter of the main site on the eastern side. This includes the construction of a new road that will link the A12 with the junction of the Northern Approach Road and Mill Road which covers land where several villa's once stood along with part of the former cricket pitch. As a consequence the dog walker's path is closed whilst the new road(s) intersect it. In my theory the new road will provide a good way to carry poor old Severalls away once demolition starts, as it avoids the majority of residential areas with a useful direct link to the A12. The new road is now nearing completion and a spur from the new link road leads ominously up to the main perimeter fence. This year, could be her last... The explore Spending all night in an asylum has been on my mooching bucket list for sometime. I wanted to experience Severalls at night (and no - it has nothing to do with ghost c**ting), but all to do with atmosphere and the gradual change from night to day and taking away (hopefully) a few half decent snaps. Explored in the always excellent company of Hamtagger and Matt Inked. It is surreal to be on a Friday late night train from Liverpool Street, stuffed full of very loud pissed up city types heading home to middle England and ponder that in just over an hours time they will all be left behind and home for the next ten and a half hours will be exclusively peaceful... 1. Full moon - it was not to be sadly. 2. Day room.. at night. 3. 4. Ok, i can hear: "what the hell is that?". I liked this effect, night sky on glazed tiles in the smaller kitchen. 5. Cold kitchen. Yes, it really was cold - middle of winter is always the best time to do an all nighter . 6. On to the next day and ablutions time. 7. I think we were feeling 'vacant' after ten plus hours... 8. Far Male Wards. These were at least 20 degrees warmer than the female side for anyone thinking of repeating this exercise. 9. 10. 11. 12. Severalls one and only chair. With the bed gone, this is the only comfort around . 13. 14. Path to paradise. Thanks for looking folks!!
  15. The building, which was completed in 1846, was designed by J B Cantrill and is Early English style with a gothic tower. It cost £3,700. In 1997, soon after the 150th Anniversary, it was found that the ceiling and roof were unsafe. The church closed quickly for repairs and the congregation met, temporarily, in the nearby Mechanics Institute. The repairs needed were found to be extensive and with great reluctance, the building and part of the churchyard were put up for sale. A final Open Air Service of Farewell was held in the new graveyard on Sunday 5th September 1999. Whatever your view of on religion, I still felt a kind of melancholy thinking of the deep affection many over the years would have felt for this place and that chances of a change of fortune for it are remote.
  16. Founded in 1897, this company manufactured Wood working machinery until it's liquidation in 2010. I believe the company name still exists in some sort of servicing capacity. A pretty cool place, although the factory floor is empty there is still a few bit's & pieces dotted about. A quick solo visit which made a good to start the 2014 season with a trouble free explore.
  17. Very "thrilly" there - seems to be inhabitated by someone (an running mp3 player, hidden in a room - attached to the linejack to somewhere... weee...), but i loved the thrill this place gave me. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
  18. DAS-Theater01 von MiaroDigital auf Flickr DAS-Theater02 von MiaroDigital auf Flickr DAS-Theater03 von MiaroDigital auf Flickr DAS-Theater04 von MiaroDigital auf Flickr DAS-Theater05 von MiaroDigital auf Flickr DAS-Theater06 von MiaroDigital auf Flickr DAS-Theater07 von MiaroDigital auf Flickr DAS-Theater08 von MiaroDigital auf Flickr DAS-Theater09 von MiaroDigital auf Flickr DAS-Theater10 von MiaroDigital auf Flickr DAS-Theater11 von MiaroDigital auf Flickr DAS-Theater12 von MiaroDigital auf Flickr
  19. Babies Castle, Hawkhurst, We decided to get out n about on a bit of a mini road trip, Chose this as the destination, took a while to get there and wanted to visit another well known site within the area for those of you that probably know it but unfortunately Its since been sold and the builders were in, This is the only fruit of our day !, So on with a bit of history Construction began on a new two-storey red brick building in the spring of 1886, and on 9th August it was formerly opened by Her Royal Highness, The Princess Mary Adelaide, Duchess of Teck, accompanied by her daughter princess Victoria who was later to become Queen Mary, the wife of King George V. In May 1959 a local Townswomen's Guild expressed 'considerable surprise' at the large number of 'coloured infants' at the Babies Castle. They warned that unless they could be assured that no white child was being refused admission as a consequence their support of Dr. Barnardo's would cease but they were reassured and the matter blew over. Clearly they had never bothered to read Thomas Barnardo's aims, known as "The Nine Nos"... 1. No destitute child refused 2. No Race Barrier 3. No Creed Clause 4. No Physical Disability 5. No Age Limit 6. No Money Promise 7. No Voting 8. No Waiting 9. No Red Tape (A lot of this Bullshit in modern day UK) Will in the famous kitchen And some of the Sumptuous Rooms, The Height of luxury in their day ! Quick, Our Way Out ! If you love Pealing Paint & Natural Decay, Then this is definitely the place for you ! All in all a fun day out with truly great company ! Thanks for viewing my Pics
  20. Thamesteel Visited with Chaos and non member Markymark History Thamesteel, in Sheerness Kent was a steel foundry until January 2012. The owners of the plant went into administration and workers came to work to be told that they no longer had a job. Nothing has happened since that day, everything lays exactly as it was, just with a layer of dust covering every last bit of history which was left behind. Another victim of Britain's lack of support for industry. Former owners the Al-Tuwairqi Group (ATG) took it back over in June, but since then there has been no news on what will happen to it except that it could cost up to £30million to decontaminate the land. Members of Community Union, which represents the workers, even wrote an open letter to ATG chairman Dr Hilal Al-Tuwairqi asking what his intentions are for the site, but he failed to respond. Rumours about other takeovers have been quashed and numerous meetings at various government departments have taken place, but still no one knows what is happening. A legal dispute about ownership of the assets is ongoing between Peel Land and Property, which owns the site, and ATG - but it is unclear when this will be resolved. There are still around 250 outstanding unfair dismissal claims filed by Community on behalf of the staff who lost their jobs. The explore Back in January when we decided to crack this it was cold....bitterly cold, we all had snotty noses and weren't really up for it. A disgustingly early 2am start was in order so that we used the cover of darkness to our advantage to gain access. We'd had a decent heads up from an outside source and after a miserable 3hr drive and disappointing McDonalds breakfast we did a quick driving recce of the fence. We decided to park up out of sight and geared up, we took a walk along the fence line and eventually found a way in, the secca hut was close by so we observed the hut and saw a high vis exit then moments later walk back in, it was now or never so we scrambled across a bit of open ground and made our way over to the mammoth site. Once in we headed at speed for the main buildings to get out of the ice cold wind, with it still being dark we cautiously made are way around and eventually managed to navigate ourselves to small office/workshop where we lay low until the sun came up, It was black as a witches tit in there. The sun slowly made appearance piercing through holes and windows in the roof slowly warming our chilled bones, the morning sun illuminating the epic size of the explore we had came for. 1. 2. Due to the nature of the closure it seemd it was simple case of 'down tools' 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Little bit of engine porn to finish off Thanks for looking
  21. I've been meaning to get over here for ages and this weekend I finally made it over to see this old hospital. A huge place, heavily trashed in places but plenty of stuff left to see. We spent about 4 hours inside with no issues and in no way did we see it all. I believe it shut in stages from 2009 with the last bit to close some time last year. Here are some pictures
  22. We stopped off here on the way back from the DRI. I have seen them many times from a distance but this was he first time I had seen them close up. They were a lot bigger than I thought. There are five towers in total and they are all that remains from both Willington A & Willington B Power stations which closed in 1995 & 1999 respectively. Only a few pics from here as we didn't stay too long.
  23. After a few failed attempts over the past year. I saw online that it was becoming popular again, so I thought I would give it a try again. This time with no problems. Spent 7 hours inside here. Didn't see anyone else. We saw fresh footprints on the floor that didn't match any of our footwear, then noticed a few doors being sealed up that weren't the first time around? strange! Any way, here are my pictures. Nothing new, just the same stuff! A couple are a slight HDR but nothing eye burning! Hope you like. Founded in the reign of King George I, the Royal Hospital Haslar in Gosport, Hampshire, was one of several hospitals serving the Portsmouth Urban Area, but had previously been the country's foremost – and ultimately last – military hospital. Its military status was withdrawn in 2007, and those military personnel remaining joined the Ministry of Defence Hospital Unit (MDHU Portsmouth) at Queen Alexandra Hospital in Cosham, Portsmouth. In the summer of 2009, all remaining (civilian) medical services at Haslar were relocated to the Queen Alexandra Hospital, and the site was subsequently sold. The Royal Military Hospital Haslar had a number of notable specialist medical facilities, including a decompression chamber and a zymotic isolation ward. History[edit] The Royal Hospital Haslar was designed by Theodore Jacobsen and built between 1746–61. The site opened as a Royal Navy hospital in 1753. It has had a very long and distinguished history in the medical care of service personnel both in peacetime and in war since that time, treating many tens of thousands of patients. Haslar was the biggest hospital – and the largest brick building – in England when it was constructed. Dr James Lind (1716–1794), a leading physician at Haslar from 1758 till 1785, played a major part in discovering a cure for scurvy, not least through his pioneering use of a double blind methodology with Vitamin C supplements (limes). The hospital included an asylum for sailors with psychiatric disorders, and an early superintending psychiatrist was the phrenologist, Dr James Scott (1785–1859), a member of the influential Edinburgh Phrenological Society. In 1902 the hospital became known as the Royal Naval Hospital Haslar (abbreviated to RNH Haslar). In the 1940s, RNH Haslar set up the country's first blood bank to treat wounded soldiers from the Second World War. In 1966, the remit of the hospital expanded to serve all three services – the Royal Navy, Army and Royal Air Force, after which time, it became known as the Royal Military Hospital Haslar. In 1996 the hospital again became known as the Royal Hospital Haslar. In 2001, the provision of acute healthcare within Royal Hospital Haslar was transferred from the Defence Secondary Care Agency to the NHS Trust. The Royal Hospital was the last MOD-owned acute hospital in the UK. The decision to end the provision of bespoke hospital care for Service personnel was taken prior to the UK's expeditionary campaigns in Iraq and Afghanistan, but was nevertheless followed through, largely on the grounds of cost. The change from military control to the NHS, and the complete closure of the hospital have remained the subject of considerable local controversy. The hospital formally closed in 2009 and the site has since started to be redeveloped. PLEASE LOOK UP AND SEE THE TRAM LINES:^ The Haslar Tramway was constructed in 1877 as a single line running from the Haslar Jetty into the Main Arcade of the hospital. At the jetty there was an ambulance shed with a junction for the storage of the ambulance tram and a similar junction at the Arcade. The two trams were built by the London and Midland Railway. Hospital boats or cutters collected the sick, wounded or dead from the anchoring fleet at Spithead and the dockyard and ferried them to the Haslar Jetty. On arrival at the jetty the patients were landed and transferred to the ambulance. Sick Berth staff then pushed the ambulance to the Main Arcade. On arrival at the Arcade the patients were then carried to the hospital receiving room for admission. Thank You!
  24. Took me three attempts to get in here, with a few injuries along the way and with the police hot on my tail for the first time. Finally got in when it opened up again, on a snowy freezing cold day. So happy! Loved it, quite an opulent place. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
  25. Visited with Webbley and Chrisr86. In Dec 2012 Maternity Bit and January 2013 for the Video! The Cambridge Military Hospital, built by Messrs Martin Wells and Co. of Aldershot, was located at Stanhope Lines. It was named after Prince George, Duke of Cambridge and opened on 18 July 1879. In the First World War, the Cambridge Hospital was the first base hospital to receive casualties directly from the Western Front. The Cambridge Hospital was also the first place where plastic surgery was performed in the British Empire. Captain Gillies (later Sir Harold Gillies), met Hippolyte Morestin, while on leave in Paris in 1915. Morestin was reconstructing faces in the Val-de-Grace Hospital in Paris. Gillies fell in love with the work, and at the end of 1915 was sent back from France to start a Plastic Unit in the Cambridge Hospital. After the Second World War, with the decline in importance of Britain's military commitments, civilians were admitted to the hospital. It pioneered the supply of portable operating theatres and supplies for frontline duties. The hospital also contained the Army Chest Unit. It was closed on 2 February 1996 due to the high cost of running the old building as well as the discovery of asbestos in the walls. http://youtu.be/Umam2fBzZy4 Thanks!
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