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  1. It’s been a while for various reasons but I am back and hitting the “move along, nothing to see here” central resource library… no seriously, nothing to see here. So after a brief chat with who turned out to be a long time reader and follower through instagram, we chose a spot to meet and hit the central resource library. Now to be honest, I was pre warned over a year ago that this place is absolutely trashed and I can confirm exactly that but it’s one I can now tick off the list. There’s not much to see, unless smashed windows and terrible graffiti is your thing so there is a lack of photos and hardly warranting a report, but here we go anyway! History wise? It’s a library… it closed and moved to a new location, that’s pretty much all I can say!
  2. This one was visited on my latest trip through Germany. This was the water treatment facility of a power plant. That power plant is already gone. There were also some outdoor water basins ,but they were well overgrown. The only thing I took from this facility were several mosquito's bites. IMG_0345-bewerkt by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_0337 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_0376 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_0366-HDR by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_0408 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_0394 by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr IMG_0364-bewerkt-bewerkt by Bart Hamradio, on Flickr
  3. History The engineering company J.E. Billups of Cardiff who also constructed Mireystock Bridge and the masonry work on the Lydbrook viaduct commenced construction of the tunnel in 1872 using forest stone. The tunnel is 221 metres in length and took 2 years to construct. The tunnel allowed the connection of the Severn and Wye Valley railway running from Lydney with the Ross and Monmouth network at Lydbrook. The first mineral train passed through the tunnel on 16 August 1874. Passenger services commenced in September 1875 pulled by the engine Robin Hood. The history of this section of line is not without incident - a railway ganger was killed in the tunnel by a train in 1893 and a locomotive was derailed by a fallen block of stone in the cutting at the northern entrance in 1898. The line officially closed to passenger trains in July 1929 but goods trains continued to use the line until the closure of Arthur & Edward Colliery at Waterloo in 1959 and Cannop Colliery in 1960. Lifting of the track was completed in 1962. The tunnel and cutting were buried with spoil in the early 1970's. Thanks to the vision and enthusiasm of a group of local Forest railway enthusiasts assisted by Forest Enterprise the top of the northern portal of the tunnel (with its unusual elliptical shape) which has lain buried for 30 years has now been exposed. As of 2018 the tunnel now still lays abandoned with no sign of the cycle track and the £50,000 funding seemingly gone to waste. Pics Thanks for looking
  4. I was passing here today on way home from work so called in to have a look ...Quite a nice little explore ☺️
  5. Visited this one with @AndyK! and @darbians as the first real stop on a big week-long derp bonanza of some sort, after two fails the day before this (after a 12+ hour drive). We had checked it out the night before, without much luck, so as it was getting late, and we were all suffering massive sleep deprivation, we decided to turn in for the night. But before leaving town in the morning for the next few stops, we decided to have another try with the help of daylight, and it sure paid off. I can't find a lot of history on this place, it seems to be quite the 'ghost' online, but it does boast some pretty epic vintage machines. What's interesting here is that it is all preserved so well, yet there are no signs of potential conversion into event space or something similar, which is something that happens a lot with these kinds of places. Photos - Cheers 😎
  6. Premier inn Manchester Visited with @GK-WAX and @vulex we was after a little get together so decided on a nice relaxed evening chilling on the Manchester skyline. After a very hot day was good to unwind and take in Liverpool he view and watch the world go by below us. DSC_3169 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3172 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3175 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3165 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3152 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3150 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3134 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3117 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3187 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3184 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3183 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3180 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3182 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3121 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3135 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3138 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3148 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3153 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3157 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3161 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3162 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3164 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DSC_3176 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  7. Hi all I'm back again! Today we went and visited an old boarding school in Chichester. We did not know if the place was abandoned but we got a tip to say it "might" be abandoned. Well...we went to check out this place and my god it has got to be one of the better ones I've been to. No graffiti onsite but just an awesome explore all in all! HISTORY: The site itself originally started life as a boarding school and has a full range of classrooms, studios and offices. They had an onsite IT room which could fit up to 20 students at a time and also 2 large greenhouses for training in horticultural skills. The centre itself was very highly-regarded in the area and was built within the grounds of a grade II listed house. It went on to become a residential educational and training centre until the site officially closed its doors in 2011. Enjoy the video and if you really liked it feel free to subscribe to our channel!
  8. Hi all, We went and visited a WW2 Shelter last night on the outskirts of London. The place was absolutely incredible and even had left behind remnants. We found it that it had been unsealed again so we decided to set off straight away as we did not want to miss this chance. I hope you enjoy the video! HISTORY: I couldn't find to much however the shelter was built on the grounds of Cane Hill Asylum around the time of WW2. There were also another 3 tunnels built at the same time. Sometime after the war the tunnels were bought by a specialist manufacture of optical devices which included mainly lenses for large telescopes. The Company left the site in the early 70s to then go on and finish trade in 1978. It basically then turned into a tipping site for old car parts until they were sealed up by the local council.
  9. My take on Prison 15H and from what I gather there is going to be a fair few from this place coming to a forum near you Soon! Thanks to Phantom Bish and Camera shy for the Intel. Cheers guys. Seems we where out the same weekend as Mr Bish but missed him by a day.. Early morning start and a Euro tunnel trip purely to do this place and then home intime for tea..This is an advantage of living 45 mins from the Euro tunnel, met many euro explorers while in the place and some well kitted up graffers on the way out.,Other than that no problems where had,even the Gypo colony in the car park wasn’t an issue.. Enough bollox from me and here’s 15 of the 230 odd I took 60% of them I was happy with but no one wants to see a apic heavy report of the place!! Explored with Sx-riffraff,Obscurity,Spaceinvader and Urban Ginger
  10. Villa Scorpio History Unfortunately I couldn't find a great deal of history surrounding this location but from what I have gathered it was built at some point during the late 19th century. The former occupier owned a large cement factory in the same town. I would imagine the family were quite well off, as it was very grand and exquisite building. The design of the villa shared various similarities with the Art Nouveau style of architecture. Featuring a stunning staircase, a beautiful skylight and an decorative greenhouse. Our visit Visited with @darbians and @vampiricsquid on our tour of Italy last summer. As soon as we arrived outside, we knew it was going to be a good explore. Hope you enjoy my photos! Externals Internals
  11. Colonia IL / Mono Orphanage History The orphanage was built on the border of Switzerland and Italy. Sadly there doesn't seem to be a lot of information out there regarding this location. From what I've gathered it originally served as an orphanage and at some point in time, it was also used as a summer camp. Despite being closed during the 1970's, it has remained in pretty good condition with minimal graffiti and vandalism. Visit Visited again with @darbians and @vampiricsquid. Unfortunately when we visited the beds had been removed but lucky there was still a lot left to photograph. The chapel was absolutely stunning and it was nice to see that some furniture, including the desks from the classrooms were still there. All in all an excellent location to finish off our Italian adventure.
  12. The small abandoned village called Polphail was built during the early 1970s to provide accommodation for up to 500 workers at a nearby oil platform construction yard in Portavadie. Unfortunately the yard was never completed and the village then lay dormant having never been occupied. The huge basin that was blasted out of the shore was dubbed ''The most expensive puddle in the world''. There have been development plans brought to the table including demolishing the site for a new marina, however due this was abandoned due to bats roosting there.
  13. After visiting a different location in the city we got a tip off from others about a possible entry point so decided to take a look. Having assessed the building for security we made our way to the entry point. The building is situated in the Neepsend area of the city and forms part of Kelham island one of the oldest industrial sites in Sheffield which as an heritage for producing high-quality cutlery and edge-tools and its pre-eminence in manufacturing heavy specialist steels. The victorian grade II listed building once occupied by Barnsley resides in 37 thousand Sq ft of industrial heritage and is the last significant development opportunity in Kelham island. Today Kelham is a mixed use riverside development which compromise the creation of old and new use of buildings forming apartments, bars & restaurants, and commercial space on the riverside site of former workshops. The development is part of an ongoing regeneration of the area by AXIS and others, which started in the 1990s with Cornish place. The development is intended to create a desirable place to live with a brand new public square, and continuation of the Don riverside walk project. Due to increasing competition from imports, Sheffield has seen a decline in heavy engineering industries since the 1960s, which has forced the sector to streamline its operations and lay off the majority of the local employment. George Barnsley's is a little like stepping back inside a time machine, most of the original machinery and features still exist and for this alone is well worth a visit before the inevitability of re development. Also noteworthy is the local artists that decorate the building with graffiti and art which gives the explore a real urban edge. And to end off a pic from modern day... I went back to this place the other day... Opening the gate to enter i didn't bother going in, the old man was right it is a dump in there and natural decay has took over... but that said if you have never been in take a look, you can get some nice shots even with a crappy iPhone
  14. A revisit @ The Christallerie didnt have much time first visit ......... 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. If anyone can tell what the House Of Esher was going to be i would love to know visited with Critical Mass & Host 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. Cheers for looking Oldskool .........
  15. It was my Father's birthday... so i took him down to Plymouth and over to Drake Island as a present... in an 8ft dinghy! It's a fantastic place, steeped in history from way back in 1135 and this is worth a read - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drake%27s_Island. Sorry the pictures lack quality, the majority were taken with a camera phone but that's another story, alas, here are a few... The target. The approach. Barracks. Seagull spotter. Cartridge Lift. My shorts were on and the chicken legs on show. Old meets new... Napoleonic fortification with WWII addition. Waves crashing against the island, over and over with spray coating the pillbox, day in and day out. Up top on the centre battery, looking back towards the barracks with Plymouth in the distance. Where things went... boom! ... and last but by no means least, more guns!
  16. Following on from our escapades here is another report from The Derpy Rotten Scoundrels Euroderp Tour earlier this year. Having spent the previous day dicking about by Lake Como, swimming in the lake, the lads got their broga on, whilst Disco Kitten put everyone to shame with her epic yoga skills. fortytwo went jungleering and spent the day battling beasts in the wilderness and arrived back after a fight with a snake. Deciding we were on the move the next day we set up camp in a derelict house looking out over the lake. Chilled out with beer and did the only to do when your Euroderping and your derp has an awesome white wall, slammed Indian Jones and the Temple of Doom on the projector and settled in for the night! Our plan was to head for the Holy Grail of NPU, having visited previously I was still excited about the chance of a revisit. So we loaded up the limo and Zsa Zsa and headed off with a plan to hit the Animal Testing Facility on the way. This is another place that is proper trashed but good for a mini derp adventure. I have no idea of its full name, or where it is as I do an excellent job of sleeping as soon as Im in the car. Its a nice little walk in and there is still some interesting stuff in there to see. I've gleaned a little bit of history from some dude who went in 2016. The place belonged to a Swiss Company who were apparently big in the animal testing industry, they moved to this site and rented the building, however when the rental contract ran out they didn't renew the contract and it fell into disrepair. The land it is built on is partly poisoned, due to there being a chemical site their previously and isn't likely to be cleaned up anytime soon. A couple of years after the facility closed it was hit by a fire, causing acrid fumes to permeate the local area. Firefighters arrived and found evidence the fire had been started deliberately but were able to stop the fire fairly quickly. Although they contained the fire, the whole site had to be checked due to rumours of the facility being occupied by refugees and concerns over the local kids playing in the buildings. The facility still has the animal operating/autopsy table in place and there is lots of medical equipment lying around, lamps, autoclaves and a gloved box unit. Anyway here's a few pics (all from my phone as I lost the ones I took on my camera ) Thanks for looking
  17. Solo jaunt. I'd looked at this a year back, but was too tired waiting for security to move away when stood at the fence. So having done another explore nearby earlier, I made another trek up to Harpur Hill. I'm well known for being a huge fan of railways and trains in particular, considering this is where my roots in exploring and much of my childhood are. That said I snub stuff like DMUs/EMUs and Underground stock, simply because they don't have the same appeal as the rusting, decayed hulk of a loco. I'm sure all of you can agree. So why did I make the effort with this? Well, three things: I've photographed a lot of the withdrawn Underground stock that's being shipped to Booth's in Rotherham, so that piqued my interest a bit. Secondly, now the last of the 1983 stock has been moved after 15+ years in open storage from South Harrow to Booth's, these have become EXTREMELY rare so it's worth capturing this whilst it's around in such a photogenic state. Lastly, I may as well have a look if I'm in the area. Comparing to pictures from a few years ago, a lot of the stock that was stored here has been moved away and presumably scrapped, leaving three driving cars: one outside, two inside. As far as I'm aware the stock is used in bomb testing of some kind, and evacuation techniques in light of the 7/7 bombings. Maybe. It's a health and safety testing site so it makes sense. Already somewhat knackered from earlier, I dragged myself up to Harpur Hill, and all was quiet. No security, no sign of activity across the site. Get over the fences and you're in, nice and easy. So that's what I did. If I'm not mistaken, this is the ex-Cockfosters or Acton stock that's moved here. After years of open storage and vandalism, the carriages have been completely sabotaged inside and out, but nevertheless are chock full of photogenic features. To paraphrase my favourite band, I can think of no greater caption than "Welcome to the scene of the crash"... Despite being graffed up inside, it was interesting to see the cabs virtually intact and untouched. From experience these are often the places where (guilty as charged, I did once as a kid) people often nick stuff for souvenirs and the like. Either that or they smash them up. Dead end The bomb tunnel Not in service To conclude, it's not that interesting a site but it's worth sharing. Sadly I feel I'm clutching at straws now that en-masse withdrawals, scrapping and storage of locos that for decades were commonplace have long since ended. Long gone are the days of asking permission from the yard foreman to look round a depot to take pictures of the derelict stock left there. Long gone are the days when you can easily sneak in undetected and not have to face the wrath of a bolshy prick who you have the misfortune of being caught by, notwithstanding more CCTV, formidable fencing and most of all, the threat of a fine and prosecution by BTP. The answer is yes, a report I posted on 28 in 2011 led to BTP knocking at my door and fining me £50 for trespass. Not a lot relative to what it could have been, but still I was out of pocket all because I posted it publicly. True, there are still some true goldmines left on the continent, the prime examples of which are Falkenberg/Elster and Istvantelek in Germany and Hungary respectively, but nothing in the UK anymore. Not unless it's covered by CCTV and forbids photographers most of the time. Life goes on though, eh? Love and best wishes as always, TBM x
  18. Had a day round North Wales afew weeks ago with Urblex, great day as usual mate. This place was the second explore of the day. The place is quite trashed to be honest, reminding me of a mix of Cookridge and Billinge Hospitals. An enjoyable little mooch all in all, worth a look if your in the area. We came across hundreds of needles quite early on during the visit which had us on edge abit. Something to bear in mind for anybody who visits later in the day or early evening. Holywell Union workhouse was erected in 1838-40 at the south of Holywell and was designed by John Welch. The Poor Law Commissioners authorised an expenditure of £6,200 on its construction which was to accommodate 400 inmates. The workhouse design followed the popular cruciform or "square" layout with separate accommodation wings for the different classes of inmate (male/female, infirm/able-bodied etc.) radiating from a central hub. To the rear, a central three-storey range connected to the central supervisory hub who observation windows gave a clear view over all the inmates yards. The main accommodation blocks ran north and south and had cross-wings at each end. In 1930, the workhouse passed into local council control and became a Public Assistance Institution. In 1948, the former workhouse became part of the National Health Services as Lluesty General Hospital. In the final years Lluesty was used to provide geriatric care up until its closure in 2008 when the towns new community hospital opened. In Febuary 2011 it was sold to developers for £275.000. The site is allocated for a development of 70 houses but as the original work houses and chapel are grade II listed, they cannot be demolished. 1 2/3 4 5/6 7 8 9 10/11 12 13 14/15 16 17 18/19 20 21 22/23 Thanks for Looking
  19. History: founded in 1836 and specializing in manufacture files and cutting tools for use in the shoe making industry, they grew to become the world’s leading producer of tools for shoemakers. The technological revolution of the 20th century saw a decline in the need for traditional tools. George Barnsley & Sons survived until 2003 when the premises finally closed. Explore: This site was 2nd on the agenda for my day in Sheffield with Miz Firestorm, Duggie & Alex. Short walk from the courts and we were there, somewhat interesting entry (although i can't go into details ) and we were in! Had a nice, undisturbed wonder round here - stunning place I must add, really enjoyed it here. I'll upload the rest of the pictures from the day once I get round to editing, but until then, have these.. As always, thanks for looking!
  20. Visited the nice old hall with friend Tom and woopashoopaa. Was part of the days planned road trip. It took us a while to find this one but managed to get there in the end after thinking it was in another location and trecking through fields of dead sheep . And around various farm houses we eventually found it. Nice big old place and when we scouted it out for a while and made our entrane not long after we heard the alarms screaming so grabbed a few shot and made our way out as the building next door is live and is part of the estate. So here's a few pics I did manage to get and some history... Brogyntyn Hall has stood abandoned for 15 years. It was owned by the Lord Harlech until 2000. Settled in the 1600s the house and its estate once presided over the land as far as the eye can see. The family was one of the great English dynasties and owners of Harlech Castle in North Wales as well. Unfortunately a string of tragedies including two Lords Harlech dying without wills, leaving massive death duties to be paid, saw the decline of the family fortunes and subsequent sale of the Hall. Interestingly it was also used during the war by British Telecom as headquarters for communications for the spy network operating in Europe. This is when it was used for the telecommunications
  21. I had my first look around some Victorian drains this week. Massive thanks to Adders for taking me, extreme_ironing, and a friend visiting from Germany to see these epic bits of infrastructure. I probably wouldn't have ventured down without his expertise and knowledge to be honest. I've also used his and Ojay's previous comprehensive reports as a reference for some factual information so cheers lads. Oh yeah, and thanks to everyone that came along for helping me light the place as my torch batteries were dead, I really need to learn from this as it's not the first time I've found myself underground trying to use my iPhone as a torch! Not Pro. These were the cleaner bits of the network, manageable in just wellies although 'clean' probably isn't the best description. Having said that I was expecting the smell to be far worse than it was but it didnt bother me one little bit whilst down there. We visited 3 separate sections in one evening and saw some epic bits, it's amazing that these old tunnels have survived so long, are still being used today and for the foreseeable future. An amazing feat in engineering and construction. Lucky Charms, officially known as Clapham storm relief, serves the Southern High Level No.1/Putney & Clapham extension & Balham Sewers. It was designed towards the end of the 19th century (approximately 1870s at a guess) by Joseph Bazalgette, the chief engineer of London's Metropolitan Board of Works. His major achievement was the creation (in response to the Great Stink of 1858) of a sewer network for central London which was instrumental in relieving the city from cholera epidemics, while beginning the cleansing of the River Thames. An old worker's cart left behind since construction took place Epic Engineering South West Storm Relief, up to the River Effra. Part of the same network as Lucky Charms but further along There were some nasty pieces of shit in the River Effra, and I'm not just referring to Adders Our German friend with camera equipment way too expensive for places like this I told Roxanne she didn't have to put on the red light but she insisted River Fleet Outfall Chamber, which deals with flows from the storm relief and the Fleet Mainline when at capacity. The Fleet storm relief was built in 1875 in order to give extra capacity to the Fleet Sewer The Fleet Mainline, it was seriously hot and steamy in here for all the wrong reasons. This was the only pic that came out ok for that reason. Abandoned machinery left to rust Penstock mechanism for the chamber below that feeds into the Low Level 1 interceptor. These allow works to shutdown the flow to certain places using the giant flaps pictured below. Apparently if you fell down here you would end up at Abbey Mills pumping station (albeit dead and smelling of shit). The outfall chamber, this fills up with Thames sludge as the Fleet is tidal. A mix of sewage, mud, silt and whatever else, probably best not to know in fact. Luckily it was only ankle deep when we were inside but it can rise up as high as the gantry in front of these flaps when at high tide. These giant 4 flaps control the flow into the main outfall chamber, must've been a pretty amazing feat to get these lumps down here back in the day Two small flaps behind here control the flow from the Fleet Storm Relief rejoining the Combined Sewer Overflow These make the most amazing boom when you lift them and let them clang Thanks for looking
  22. The turbine steamship TSS Dover - later renamed the Earl Siward, Sol Express and finally the Tuxedo Royale - was built in 1965 as a roll-on/roll-off ferry and spent much of her later life as a floating nightspot beneath the Tyne Bridge,The Tuxedo closed in 2006 and owners Absolute Leisure went into administration three years later. In its heyday, thousands of people partied aboard the boat and its sister vessel: Visited here with Fat Panda after a rather boring hospital in Durham. When we arrived the gap to the boat was a little bigger than expected and instead of jumping and falling in the water/sludge beneath us we found some wood and bodged a bridge together We spent a while having a look around and although its wrecked in there it still makes for a interesting mooch! Our visit was cut short due to secca busting us as he heard us on his patrol, after we stepped off the boat he threw our bodged bridge into the water Cheers for looking
  23. One of my favourite decay locations ! Love the colours of the machine rooms so much.
  24. Seems as if the tour bus is in town, and I'm the last off:D The History: I'm sure everyone knows already, and most people won't bother reading (I wouldn't blame you) but have some history anyway.. The hospital closed in 2012 upon completion of the new Queen Elizabeth Hospital. Relocation of the first services from Selly Oak began during the summer of 2010 when its A&E department moved to the new Q.E.Hospital on 16 June and over the next 7 days Critical Care and other departments moved step-by-step the 1.5 miles to the new hospital. On average one inpatient was moved every 5 minutes between 7 am and early evening On the morning of 23 May 2010 a ‘Service of Thanks’ was held at Selly Oak Hospital to celebrate a century of caring and this was followed by a fun fair at which staff and patients were invited to “Take a Trip Down Memory Laneâ€, sign a memory wall [3] and contribute to an on-line memories website. The reorganization was first planned in 1998 though it was not until October 2004 that planning approval was given by Birmingham City Council, with construction beginning during 2006. Selly Oak Hospital was well renowned for the trauma care it provided and had one of the best burns units in the country. It was also home to the Royal Center for Defense Medicine, which cared for injured service men and women from conflict zones, as well as training service medical staff in preparation for working in such areas. In March 2007, the Hospital was alleged to be not properly treating Iraq war veterans. The hospital has also appeared in national newspapers with stories of servicemen being verbally abused in the hospital by members of the public opposed to the war. There were also difficulties when Jeremy Clarkson went to the hospital to give gifts to the wounded serviceman. A report published by the House of Commons Defense Select Committee blamed the allegations against the hospital on a smear campaign and praised the clinical care provided to military patients. The Explore: Now it's not often I get to say this, but I actually got a lay in on an explore - 7am! But we were up and out sharpish, and heading over to Selly. We got there, and after pondering several entry methods for a while, we finally decided. Except, it involved a hell of a lot of bushes, brambles and a few stinging nettles, but eventually we were in! We were heading towards the morgue when we heard voices.. had we been spotted already?! Thankfully not, and it was other explorers. Quick introductions were made, and after a stupid climb through a very awkward entry point we were in! Decided to have a look round the main hospital after, and eventually to the other buildings.. big mistake! Within about 3 minutes we'd tripped 4 alarms. We snapped a few quick pictures, and made an exit. Good timing really, as by the time we'd got back to the car and were heading home, police were all over it.. lucky escape:thumb Better get on with some pictures.. As always, thanks for taking the time to view this. Cheers guys
  25. Decided it was time to get out exploring again so sorted out a visit to Selly Oak as its been on my list for ages. Met up with two other explorers on the day and had a good look around. Getting into the mortuary is a bit risky but so worth it! History The first buildings on the site of Selly Oak Hospital were those of the King's Norton Union Workhouse. It was a place for the care of the poor and was one of many workhouses constructed throughout the country following the introduction of the Poor Law Amendment Act of 1834. This act replaced the earlier system of poor relief, dating from 1601. The hospital closed in 2012 upon completion of the new Queen Elizabeth Hospital. Relocation of the first services from Selly Oak began during the summer of 2010 when its A&E department moved to the new Q.E.Hospital on 16 June and over the next 7 days Critical Care and other departments moved step-by-step the 1.5 miles to the new hospital. On average one inpatient was moved every 5 minutes between 7 am and early evening. On the morning of 23 May 2010 a 'Service of Thanks' was held at Selly Oak Hospital to celebrate a century of caring and this was followed by a fun fair at which staff and patients were invited to "Take a Trip Down Memory Lane", sign a memory wall and contribute to an on-line memories website. The reorganisation was first planned in 1998 though it was not until October 2004 that planning approval was given by Birmingham City Council, with construction beginning during 2006. Pictures Mortuary Outpatients X-Ray Main Hospital More pictures up here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/stuarthomas/sets/72157654300167915
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