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Found 11 results

  1. Please share your own doors in the comments
  2. Woolley Hall The history Woolley Hall is a landscape park largely unchanged since 1800. The park is associated with a Jacobean Hall (dated to around 1635 with later alterations). Features include wooded pleasure grounds, a ha-ha, kitchen garden and ponds. The main house is Grade II listed and the courtyard is Grade II listed as being of Special Architectural and Historic Interest. Michael Wentworth began rebuilding Woolley Hall in 1635. The new Woolley Hall consisted of an 'H'-shaped building of moderate size. An east wing was added to the south front around 1680. The western wing was added during the mid eighteenth century. The eastern wings which form the rest of the present building were added in the early nineteenth century. The house is constructed of hammer-dressed sandstone, with a slate roof. There are four storeys including the attic and basement. Recently Woolley Hall went up for sale (2014) with a guide price of £3m from its owners, Wakefield Council. It was purchased in 2015 by new owners Commercial Development Projects (CDP). Plans were submitted (2016) for a hotel conversion for the Grade II listed building. (CDP) had put forward a proposal to create a 88-bedroom hotel, with function facilities to cater for 300 guests, spa treatment rooms and a gastro restaurant. But (CDP), sent an email to the council (2017) to say they have withdrawn the plans, but gave no explanation. In reaction to the withdrawal, assistant chief executive for resources and governance at Wakefield Council, Michael Clements said: “Wakefield Council agreed to sell Woolley Hall to a local developer last year. “The sale was conditional upon them developing the site into a boutique hotel. “Disappointingly, this deal has now fallen through. It is thought the proceeds would be used to re-invest council capital with a spoke person stating “The proceeds from the sale will be used to support the council’s capital investment plans across the district whilst it will also provide an annual budget saving to help us deal with the funding cuts imposed on us by the Government.” The explore The hall sits in pleasant surroundings and considering its recent endeavour has a boutique hotel it looks like efforts are been made to keep the hall well maintained. so... during a very windy February morning we moved in for a closer look. It was a little difficult to know where to start with this one as there were quite a few different access routes to the hall... Not knowing if we would be met by a security team we started documenting the building from a far whilst slowly moving in. The hall is quite something and reminded us of one of those old hammer house movies... albeit without Dracula. Moving slowly to the east side of the hall we came across what looked like an old boiler house... although four boilers remained only one was operational... perhaps part of the councils money saving scheme. Making our way though we entered the main hall.. Surprisingly most of the rooms original architecture is preserved with some rather exquisite flooring and panelling. although some of the rooms were accessible most of the doors were bolted and without wrecking what looked like a very well preserved old door we decided to document what we could and move on. Although the main hall was the main attraction we decided to explore some of the stable blocks to the north of the hall... It looks like this was used by council departments including Wakefield social services among others. Largely empty with left overs from its office days with little else on offer. There was some very unusual looking housing quarters although we could not find any entry to these building. On leaving the stable blocks we were met by a very pleasant care taker who gave us a little history whilst politely telling us to f*uck off... The pics The main hall The stable block The boiler house oh well time for a game of golf... LBE
  3. Dobroyd mill The history Dobroyd Mills was built in 1829. A fine cloth manufacturer Dobroyd Ltd was founded at the mill in 1919. The mill closed in 1974, but was re-opened in 1976 under John Woodhead Ltd spinners. It currently houses several businesses including a classic car restoration firm and tea rooms. The future of Dobroyd Mills became a subject of debate when the current owners Z Hinchliffe began reducing the height of the chimney last year (2011). Concerned neighbours referred Dobroyd Mill to the English Heritage when the works began. But an inspector from English Heritage decided the Mill was not suitable for the list of buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest. Planning permission to knock down two sections on the northern end of the complex was granted by Kirklees Council last month (2012). The stone structures were deemed unsuitable for modern use. The explore The Mill resides in pleasant surroundings with parts rented to a few small businesses including a quaint tea room... doing some rather unorthodox rambling to the bemusement of nearby dog walkers we eventually arrived at the Mill. The Mill sits on top of a stream and in it's surrounding offers some peace from modern living. The exterior is generally in good condition with little sign of vandalism... The Mill stretches over some 4.04 hectares and took just over an hour to explore. Theres a few original features scattered around including some pretty heavy duty scales ... eleswhere empty rooms which bizarrely looked like they had just received their annual spring clean. looks like 'Love 37' and 'CarrotBoy' have done a few jobs here too. The pics
  4. "Wallpaper paper peeling heaven" History Eastmoor Secure Unit for Children, located near the small village of Adel in Leeds West Yorkshire opened in 1857 as the Leeds Reformatory for Boys by the Leeds Society for the Reformation of Juvenile Offenders, on a site deliberately chosen to be removed from the temptations of the city. Reformatories were distinguished from Industrial Schools by taking young people who had actually committed offences such as begging, wandering, consorting with thieves and prostitution, opposed to those who were merely destitute or neglected and in danger of falling into crime. There were around 50 boys at the school in 1858. The south-east range and headmaster’s house was added in 1860, when the attic floor of the initial range was converted to dormitories. The workshops of the north-east range, built by the boys in 1859, were rebuilt in 1881 after a fire, and a separate chapel to the south was added in 1882, The swimming pool beyond the north-west range was added in 1887 and roofed in 1896. A boiler room between the north-west range and the pool was inserted in 1899 to heat the pool. It was used by community groups as well as inmates, and swimming and life-saving were taught. (This swimming pool is now one of the oldest in the country.) The buildings continued in use as an approved school named Eastmoor School from 1933 and then a community home when it was taken over by Leeds CC on 1st April 1973. It was then known as Eastmoor CHE, that is Community Home with Education. A number of separate houses were constructed around the core site from the 1950s onwards, but there has been little change to the buildings externally. In 1993 a secure unit for young offenders was built on part of the site, the Eastmoor approved school which housed some of the countries most dangerous child criminals including one of the Bulger Killers, Jon Venables. The site was leased to Leeds Metropolitan University from the late 1990s when the surrounding houses were used for student accommodation who left when a new campus opened in Headingley in 2003. It has been unused since c2004 and has been marketed for housing development. Explore Little hard to find this one and is some distance from the centre. Having trailed through woodland, through peoples back gardens (sorry) and then finally walking a further distance we came across this desolate hospital. The x-hospital sits next to a brand new secure unit for children, which gives the place a surreal feel. The building is in an extremely poor condition most of the upper floorS have gaping holes through to the lower floors and there is a high presence of asbestos. In the courtyard someone as gone to the trouble to spell out 'HELL IS PCP' using huge stones that have been piled in the courtyard, guessing building works commenced at some point. Theres a lot of atmosphere in the building and a few times we were sure there were others camping around the building. Worth an explore just watch the floors and the local addicts... oh and there a bar in the building (unfortunately not selling beverages) most probably installed for the students. Pics 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. LE FIN
  5. History The works was built in 1913 and extended in 1954, to purify water from the Strines, Dale Dike and Agden reservoirs. In 1930 it had the first telephone installed in Bradfield and served well with the Yorkshire Water Authority taking over in in 1974. The UK’s water industry became privatised in 1989, the premises closed in 1994 following the completion of the new Water Treatment Works in the Loxley Valley. More recently Proposals to convert the derelict water filter works into housing have being held up by bats. A protected species survey has to be carried out in the summer (2014) before a decision can be taken on an application to turn the derelict building into 15 studio apartments. The scheme, which also involves adding five cottages in the grounds and using old ponds as a trout farm, off Mill Lee Road, has been withdrawn for the time being. It is due to be resubmitted to the Peak Park planning authority once the survey results are known. Read more at: https://www.sheffieldtelegraph.co.uk/news/environment/bats-delay-village-housing-scheme-in-low-bradfield-1-6525905 Explore Bit off the beaten track this one... that said the works is set in a picturesque village situated just outside Sheffield. The building is built from yorkshire stone and sits well in its surroundings albeit in its derelict state. The building is sat on large plot of land although the works itself is a little on the small side considering its past as a water works. The works consist of three rooms, one of those smaller to the rear of the building. Theres also a raised office area off one of the larger rooms and toilets at the opposite side. The building is in good condition to say it's been left for over twenty years with easy entry to the building. Theres lots of graffiti some of which are shown in the post... this said not all are represented here. Its definitely worth a visit and offers entry level explorers a great insight into urban exploring + theres a great pub just across the road offering a great local ale. Some pics Little lad absolutely loving it from above It's been a while since we explored speaking with others it has a full time security guard and some high end CCTV have also been installed
  6. Kastix Ltd History Built in 1947 as the new drill hall for the 2nd Volunteer Battalion West Riding Regiment. Later used as the offices for Kastix, a textile company producing womenswear and children's clothing, which went in to receivership in 2001 with the loss of more than 50 jobs. Conversion plans There are currently plans to demolish the site to construct an Aldi supermarket. The exterior Bit out of the way... but was in the area so decided to take a look. Its a fair size and considering it's had no owners since 2001 the condition of the place is pretty decent. Stopping at the top of the road and checking for hostiles we decided to take a closer look. Theres lots of works adjacent and we attracted quite a few spectators as we scrambled through the fencing... moving in we could see there were a few CCTV cameras, rusty and outdated these were perhaps part of the security measures when the building was last working. Starting at the front and working our way to the back (drawn quite a crowd at this point) we were intrigued to find an entry point. The exterior is fitting with the period and will be a shame when the building is demolished to make way for the plastic prefabs that are ALDI. Most of the windows and doors are original but it looks like efforts were made to modernise the building at some point. Scaling the roof... checking for open doors windows (bingo).. we were in. The interior Making our way through a small room and then into a much larger hall we were a little taken back by the size of the building... Strewn garments, hangers and palettes of junk made us a little unsettled and it was almost like a worker was about to appear and escort us off the premises (or maybe try sell us some clothing). Making our way past the left overs we headed to the doors littered across the back of the building. slowly working through the rooms we came to the main stairwell... making our way to the upper floors...we made our way through the many offices, empty and miscellaneous rooms ending in an area with some pretty creepy looking changing rooms. Overall theres a few cool bits and in our opinion its worth documenting if not for the very creepy mannequins, the overall condition or the asthetics the sheer amount of stuff left over from previous occupiers. There also an attic area which was a little difficult to reach but it did look like someone had gone to the effort to investigate. That concludes the explore...
  7. The George Hotel as stood empty for just a little over 5 years... considering this it's not half bad inside, stairways are still intact, few if any holes through to other floors, little decay in the form of mold or interior fatigue and there's still gas in the pumps in the bar area. It's a fair size and took us over an hour to appreciate some of the victorian features still visible throughout the building. The building was sold a few years back to a local dentist for £900,000 but nothing if anything as started interns of building works to restore the hotel. which is a shame as the Hotel sits in pleasant surroundings within St George square which recently received a £21 million facelift. The Hotel as a basement area which stores the cask ales & equipment needed to run the Hotel bar. Theres rooms a plenty 60 rooms accommodation with bar(s) , ballroom, pool hall and dining room & rooftop area ... we pretty much covered the entire building in a typically dreary Huddersfield afternoon. Hope you enjoy the thread... Exterior Bar Main lobby Stair case shots Corridor shots Bed rooms The caller The ball room and dinning hall The kitchen The roof Other rooms 45 pics later... Hope you enjoyed...
  8. History The woollen mill was owned by Samuel Firth of Gatehead in Marsden, and opened in 1888. He also owned Holme Mill. By the 1960s, it was owned and run by Fisher, Firth & Co. which became Cellars Clough Woollen Mills Ltd, managed by another Firth son, in 1981. The company has now been dissolved. Situated just off the Huddersfield Narrow Canal, the mill’s pond is now a very popular fishing spot. Planning permission was granted for the conversion of the mills and former offices to 101 dwelling units, 9 live/work units, a resident’s gym, pool, shop, meeting room, bike store, car park and improvements to the access road. Previous planning applications have been unsuccessful as bats were found to be residing in the mill. The bats weren’t forcibly removed, so the hope was that they would eventually choose the ‘improved accommodation’ for themselves. Explore We decided to spend a day in Huddersfield looking at some of the heritage of the town... so we ended up in Marsden which is to the east of the town we came across two mill Cellars Clough and Bottoms Mill.. unfortunately we couldn't find a way in Bottoms Mill so instead explored Cellars.. It looks like some work was carried out some years back as part of the mill is demolished with brick piled around in the courtyard. The Mill is in poor condition and its difficult to access the upper floors due to both staircases been blocked by stone rubble although we did manage to climb the staircases the floors look ready to collapse at anytime.. at the top floor theres a ladder to enter what looked liked an office although we did not attempt the climb ... overall worth a look if not for the explore it offers an insight into how mills were constructed and the size of these is truly astounding .. Pics Bad video pics The mill is in a sorry state in 2018 But there is still some nice pics to be had in there...
  9. In 1847, Joseph Watts of Dewsbury and William Stones (1827 -1894) of Sheffield began brewing together at the Cannon Brewery in Sheffield's Shalesmoor district near Kelham Island. ... He renamed it the Cannon Brewery after his original premises. Stones soon became one of the richest men in Sheffield and worked up until his death in 1894. A light coloured beer, named Stones Bitter, was produced in the early 1940’s and this soon became a popular choice amongst steel workers across Sheffield. Cannon Brewery grew significantly as its reputation increased and sales prospered, to the extent that new offices, stores, workshops and cellars were all improved and developed. At its peak, the brewery produced 50,000 hectolitres of cask conditioned Stones each year and many of Sheffield’s public houses developed close ties to the brewery and Stones Bitter. An on-site public house was also opened within Cannon Brewery in 1964, “ originally named ‘The Underground’, but renamed as ‘The Pig and Whistle’ to service both visitors and workers, and this can still be found today. Cannon Brewery was closed in 1999 following reports that were indicative of a substantial decline in the sale of cask ales. The owner of the site is a demolition contractor and has submitted an application seeking permission for his business, Hague Plant, to bulldoze the buildings on the 0.7 hectare plot which, in documents drawn up by R Bryan Planning, are described as being of utilitarian design and of no historic or architectural significance. The owner is keen to redevelop the former brewery but has said that it is not effectively marketable in its current state, especially as the high cost of demolition and potential decontamination, particularly from asbestos, are a deterrent to developers. Explore Been looking at this as a potential explore for sometime... The buildings and architecture are something else and anyone who's anyone on the Sheffield graffiti scene have decorated the building with some great pieces.. The former brewery is in poor condition but offers explorers a great opportunity to appreciate the history and architecture of the former brewery. A real shame when they decided to pull the building as this is a real part of Sheffields brewing past.. explore whilst you still have chance.. as this building offers plenty for all. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. and 16. Graffiti on site 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. My favourite pic I took of this place Le fin "Times have changed, the place in its current condition is trashed and flooded... (2018)"
  10. History Officially opened by the Earl of Scarborough in 1957, it was built the year before for £350,000 as headquarters for Leeds chemicals and dyestuffs firm Brotherton and Co and was at the heart of a new business area at the Westgate end of The Headrow. It was named in recognition of the famous Leeds city benefactor family, after the Brotherton Library and Collection at Leeds University, the Charles Brotherton engineering and chemical laboratory, the Brotherton Wing at the Leeds General Infirmary and the Brotherton Charity Trust. It was dubbed as the design of the future with the “latest external and internal structural techniques, automatic ventilation and ceiling heating”. Its ceilings were reported to be “acoustically perfect”, and its floors covered in highly-polished parquet. It was in 1965 – long before the merging of local police forces and the establishment of the current West Yorkshire force, that the old Leeds City Police took over part of the building and ultimately established its administrative headquarters there. In addition to the then Chief Constable and his Assistant Chief, numerous other police departments have been based at Brotherton House over the decades including senior CID, Special Branch, Fraud Squad, Regional Crime Squad, Firearms Registry, Aliens Department, Force Prosecutions, Special Constabulary, Training, Photographic and Fingerprint departments, the then so-called Policewomen’s Department, Pay and Accounts. Most notable investigations to have been carried out at Brotherton house was the notorious "Ripper squad" which was applied to a group of investigators and was the term used by the media for the investigation into the Yorkshire Ripper murders. Including George Oldfield the man in charge of the investigation. Today, the building – which has largely been vacated – overlooks the Leeds Inner Ring Road and is described by its agents as a “substantial high-profile office building with a significant presence.” Explore A day out in Leeds, driving on the ring road I noticed a building covered in green fabric... on closer inspection we found out by locals telling us that the building was abandon. Mostly the building is in good condition with a large amount of original features untouched.. the main hall is really something with original parquet flooring and a grand stair case leading into the main building. Corridors lead to open staircases on both sides of the building which offer access to the buildings six floors including rooftop. Pics 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. and 12 13. 14. 15. 16. and 17. LE FIN
  11. History Bishopgarth was first built in 1891 for the Bishop to live in. In 1946 the site became the West Yorkshire Metropolitan Police Training School. The classrooms were built in 1952 and the new block added in 1969 (the accommodation). There were 14 course's for training police men/women these course's included fingerprints, computer training, firearms, public speaking and traffic management. Bishopgarth could take a maximum of 250 students at any one time and usually there were 200 students staying at the on-site accommodation. To be a policeman you must be 5'9\" tall and for a policewoman 5'6" tall. This is the same as 166cm tall for policemen and 154cm tall for policewomen. The police moved to a new facility in Carr Gate in 2014. The Carr Gate complex houses Firearms, Driver, Public Order, Crime, IT, Foundation and Leadership and Development training. But the question is what will happen to the the now old and abandoned Bishopgarth police training well the first option proposed by the planners would see the entire site used for new homes, believed to be between 120 and 150. The second option would see the number of suggested homes reduced to include space for a residential care home. There is some more info on the matter here https://www.wakefieldexpress.co.uk/news/plans-for-150-homes-and-care-home-at-bishopgarth-1-6890284 1. Explore Upon arriving we noticed a massive metal fence around the perimeter, but we also noticed a lot of gaps in the fence as soon as we got walking down the drive way we got rustled by the security. We Looped around to the back where the alleged bishops palace is and snuck in through there... From getting into the bishopgarth area we headed straight to the accommodation building... we did this because we only really came for that building. When we got there we heard rustling, peeking around the corner and seeing a hi-viz vest it was security so quickly we had to run across the courtyard... thankful we missed the security, walking up the stairs to the main entrance of the accommodation building it was boarded so we looked around the whole permitter and found some boards ripped off at the side... looking around the building was like walking around a maze thankfully not a pitch black one thanks to our exploring light. Once we got past the first few floors what contained the dinning room and the main entrance it was just copy paste bedrooms and corridors. After we explored a floor of the bedrooms we got our assess up to the top floor AKA the roof access, we spent a while looking at the landmarks of wakefield and taking pics of the roof but it was hard because at this point we did not want to get spotted... running down the stairs to get out, had a lot more to explore!!! After the buzz of the accommodation building, we thought it would be hard to beat... ow god was we mistaken. After sneaking across the path we ran into the office/ classrooms... not much going on the outside of the building but once we entered (by opening the door) it was of its rocker! Walking in we had access to the bottom floor, very dark there were a couple classrooms and some office type looking buildings but the real deal was the top floor. We found the stairs after about 15mins of looking around... up the stairs were the IT classrooms and some offices with everything still inside. After we took pics of the upstairs, we wanted to get out but knowing there was the main entrance (with the automatic doors) we had a deeper look... finally we found it, did not expect wooden cladding, a safe, some nice stairs and some trash we was more than happy. But there was still some stairs to climb up... a whole new world (another corridor with some classrooms) the only bit worth looking at up there is the graffiti where the homeless slept. To end of on a positive note we thought we would have a look around the many 'houses' on the site... only getting in one which was a little outhouse at the back of the accommodation building... i say a little outhouse but if we bumped into that when we stared off we would have lost our minds. After that we got some more externals but we just wanted to get off really... PICS 2. 3. 4. Narrowly avoiding security 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. The admin office. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. SAFE 27. 28. 29. 30. LE FIN
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