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  1. HMP Holloway was the largest women’s only prison in Europe until its closure in 2016. Rebuilt between 1971 to 1985, the prison's design was intended to produce an atmosphere more like a hospital than a prison. This design was recognised as a failure in the 1980s as its lack of traditional wings or landings, and a maze of corridors, means warders had difficulty monitoring inmates. Entrance to the rebuilt prison (CC Licence) The history of Holloway dates back to 1852 when the original prison opened as a mixed-sex establishment, but due to the increasing demand for space for female prisoners, it became female-only in 1903. Inmates of the original prison included Oscar Wilde, and more recently Moors murderess Myra Hindley from 1966. The original Holloway Prison (public domain image) Holding female adults and young offenders either sentenced by the courts or being held on remand, the prison consisted mostly of single cells, but there was also various dormitory accommodation. In January 2016 an inquest into the death of Sarah Reed, a paranoid schizophrenic being held on remand, identified failings in the care system. The prison was closed in July 2016, with plans for it to be sold for housing. Time to start the unofficial tour.... Wandering between the modern buildings within the prison grounds Let's head straight into the cells... Dorm room Single prisoner cell Another dorm room Mural in one of the many winding corridors Twin room Lots of peely paint in some places There were several styles of cell Entrance into the prison... Prisoner transport vehicles would park inside this area, and the gates closed behind them The front entrance leads into this area, with a command room behind the glass Corridors lead into the prison Each area separated by iron gates Prisoner amenities and facilities Entrance into the "family friendly" visitor centre. Visitors and prisoners could be kept separated in these divided rooms The prison had a swimming pool for prisoners to use And gym facilities The glazed walkway was decorated by inmates The prison had a medical ward, including its own opticians Pharmacy Covered walkway leading to the chapel. Note the high-security walls The chapel was large but pretty basic More inmate artwork Mural inside one of the rooms A room for presentations The prison's boiler house Exterior of the buildings within the prison walls High fences divided the exterior areas
  2. Hi all, We went and visited a WW2 Shelter last night on the outskirts of London. The place was absolutely incredible and even had left behind remnants. We found it that it had been unsealed again so we decided to set off straight away as we did not want to miss this chance. I hope you enjoy the video! HISTORY: I couldn't find to much however the shelter was built on the grounds of Cane Hill Asylum around the time of WW2. There were also another 3 tunnels built at the same time. Sometime after the war the tunnels were bought by a specialist manufacture of optical devices which included mainly lenses for large telescopes. The Company left the site in the early 70s to then go on and finish trade in 1978. It basically then turned into a tipping site for old car parts until they were sealed up by the local council.
  3. This was another one of those what the fuck just happened moments in my life. So I was on my way back from (not so) sunny South Wales with @The_Raw @extreme_ironing and @sentinel after visiting @Lenston when I got a call from a very excited @Frosty. "Mail Rail is doable." I know by now if he says something is possible then he's normally right. We had looked at ways into the network on many many occasions, each time being thwarted at the 11th hour by something so this was high on our list and deserved all our attention. Initially like a fool I passed on this trip. Well I was supposed to be at work early the next day and I was, for want of a better word, fucked. An enthusiastic night out drinking the night before had definitely taken it's toll. However on my home to sunny(er) Kent after dropping some people off in London, I realised what an immense idiot I was being and 4 hours later found myself back where I had just been with the people I had just been with (minus @sentinel who was sleeping off his weekend) emerging into the gloomy depths of the abandoned tunnels. It was an insane day. The Post office Railway (or Mail rail as it became known) is for many considered the 'holy grail' of exploration, especially in London. I can understand why, you've got an entire abandoned miniature underground railway complete with stations, rolling stock, miles of tunnel and the powers still on. It's pretty cool. You can walk for miles under London's streets and not really know where you are and it's also not that easy to access. It was constructed in the early part of the 20th century to link together some of the main London sorting offices and alleviate delays that occurred in moving mail around London on the surface. Construction started in 1915, but was suspended just over a year later due to labour shortages. The line was eventually completed and became available for use during 1927 and was in service from February 1928 onward. I could go into the detailed history of the railway and it's design, but I'd be writing for ages and there's plenty online about it if you want to do some research. Needless to say that by the early 2000's the system was in need of major investment to keep it working efficiently and now only had 3 stations out of the original 7 due to relocation of the sorting offices above. In 2003 the railway was officially mothballed, but has more-or-less been totally abandoned. It would take a significant injection of cash to even think about bringing it back into service and there wouldn't be much point as there's now only 2 live sorting offices located on the route, pity. In October 2013 the British postal museum announced plans to open part of the network to the public and indeed this is pressing ahead. In the coming years it will be possible to visit the station and workshops at Mount Pleasant and (apparently) go on a short train ride round one of the loops. I'm actually pleased at least part of the system is being preserved because it is a unique place and deserves it's place in history. I just hope they do a good job and don't make it too gimmicky. What you see here is only a small section of the line from Rathbone place to Mount Pleasant. I needed to get home so I left after we reached Mount Pleasant. Regretted it ever since because try thou we might we've not managed to get back in, but we have got oh so close (oh you have no idea!) So on with some photos. It won't be anything you've not seen before, but here is my take on the Post Office Railway. Rathbone station is now a tad damp because of the building work going on above it. Typical tunnel section twin tracks Before the stations, the twin tracks break into two smaller tunnels and split apart to go either side of the platform. This was actually an abandoned tunnel to the original western district office which was re-located in 1958. The abandoned tunnel was used as a siding to store locomotives and wagons in. Trains in tunnels Just before Mount Pleasant station, you have these massive doors, which I'm lead to believe are for flood protection. Coming up to Mount Pleasant And that's as far as I went. Thanks for Looking! Maniac.
  4. The Post Office Railway, also known as Mail Rail, is a driverless underground railway 6 1⁄2 miles (10.5 km) long from Paddington to Whitechapel built to move mail between sorting offices. Inspired by the Chicago Tunnel Company, it operated from 1927 until 2003. Construction of the 2 ft (610 mm) narrow gauge tunnels started in February 1915 from a series of shafts. During 1917 work was suspended due to the shortage of labour and materials. By June 1924 track laying had started. In February 1927 the first section, between Paddington and the West Central District Office, was made available for training. The line became available for the Christmas parcel post in 1927 and letters were carried from February 1928. A Royal Mail press release in April 2003 said that the railway would be closed and mothballed at the end of May that year. Royal Mail had earlier stated that using the railway was five times more expensive than using road transport for the same task. Despite a report by the Greater London Authority in support of continued use, the railway was closed in the early hours of 31 May 2003. It has sat disused ever since but there are plans to open a museum in 2016. When I first got into this exploring malarkey one of the first people I met was a train geek who was obsessed with getting into mail rail. In fact the only reason he got into exploring was to find his way inside there. I'd never even heard of it at the time but it quickly went top of my list. We spent hours discussing how we could find an access point but we never really got any further than wandering around outside sorting offices peeking through fences. Silent UK's blog was a point of reference for us at the time yet mysteriously got taken offline not long after we'd seen it. Rumours circled that it had been taken down by the authorities and that individuals were facing legal action over it. It became clear that this site was going to be a force to be reckoned with. Around this time I was told by somebody that the one and only place we were really interested in trying was completely sealed and that nobody would ever be getting in that way. My friend at the time didn't hang around on the exploring scene for much longer after that. Roll on a couple of years later however and that is exactly the way that a load of us got in! More thanks to a tip off rather than a stroke of genius but who cares. Cheers to the guys who came along and made the night happen, one of the best nights exploring I've ever had. We covered about two thirds of the network that night I think. It was thirsty work for a group with nothing more than a 2L bottle of Fanta between us. This was a special one that took a couple of days afterwards to really sink in and even looking through my photos now makes me smile from ear to ear! My pics are a little bit jumbled up and a mixture of quality but the best I could come up with, hope you enjoy! 1. New Oxford Street station 2. 3. 4. Emergency escape shaft 5. 6. 7. King Edward Street station, a very derelict feel to this one 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Various sections of tunnel and midget trains 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. Floodgate Door 18. 19. 20. ....and last but not least, Mount Pleasant sorting office, where you just have to try and ignore the infrared cameras everywhere and go about your business even though you can hear London's busiest sorting office in action right above your head! Crazy in there 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. So that's Mail Rail. We saw a lot more of it than I've shown, some of my pics came out too naff and some things I didn't photograph because we were too pushed for time. It is one cool ass place to explore and I can only wish that one day I get the chance to see it again. Thanks again to all involved
  5. looking for couple people who are game for climbs in and around london ?
  6. I came here with Elliot5200, Gabe and Indecisive Moment. The buildings have beautiful exteriors and although the contents have mostly been removed there are still many features to admire. The staircase in particular was stunning and the military records library contained beautiful mahogany cabinets for storing records, unfortunately the records have been removed now. The main building with the four turrets had most of the best stuff but the buildings behind were also accessible with a few rooms worth checking out such as the old bar. This was a nice chilled out wander for a couple of hours in good company. Here's some history.... The Royal Military Academy at Woolwich was founded in 1741 at the Royal Arsenal. The need for more space led to a move to large new buildings on Woolwich Common in 1806, where cadets were taught mathematics, fortifications, French, chemistry, drawing and dancing. Among the hundreds of officers who graduated from the academy, probably the best known are Lord Kitchener and General Gordon of Khartoum. In 1945, the academy transferred to Sandhurst to merge with the academy there. Durkan Group bought the Woolwich site by public tender in 2006. Many of the Woolwich buildings have since been converted and extended into 334 houses and apartments, including 150 for a housing association. Renovation work is currently ongoing. Onto the pics.... Thanks for looking
  7. Designed by Architect to the Metropolitan Police, John Dixon Butler FRIBA, the Greenwich Magistrates’ Court opened in 1909 with an integral police station. The Symmetrical frontage is faced in Portland Stone in a free Classical style and features a central semi-circular tablet with Royal Coat of Arms, carved in stone by Lawrence Turner. Inside, the entranceway leads to the former police station foyer which has a mosaic tiled floor with MP monogram (for Metropolitan Police) laid by Messrs Diespeker. The foyer leads onto Court 1, the main courtroom which is toplit with a decorative plaster frieze around the light well and a monogram of Edward VII in plaster above the bench. The Courtroom has mostly original fittings and the bench is in a curved recess, up three steps. The court has its own custody suite. The suite consists of nine prison cells with associated facilities for booking in prisoners etc. Visited here with @AndyK! a few months back. We sat on this for a while as we were hoping to return and see if we missed any bits but haven't got around to it. Anyway, I think we saw all the best bits. Here are some of my photos to begin with, and a few taken by Andy at the end. I also poached the history from his website report, so cheers for that! A few shots of the custody suite from Andy Thanks for looking
  8. Kings Hall Cinema, Southall, London - September 2017 Interesting one this one! I'd wanted to do this for a while and had been planning to in the coming weeks but had been put off with the idea of its "unique access" which requires some planning in terms of times of entry! Situated on a very busy road with lots of passersby and businesses open till the very wee hours, there is a very small window to get inside as the Night Shift commute changes to the Early and Day Shift Commute. When we arrived it was around midnight and the streets were busy. We were in London so went for a little drive for an hour or so before returning. Visited with a non-member back in September;when inside we had a little lie down in a dark corner for an hour or so to allow the sun to rise just a little bit, and spent about 2 hours light painting the rooms which were boarded and anything which the abundance of daylight wouldn't help. It's a very interesting building with lots to shoot photos of and with my "loaded" parking meter fast running out, we didn't have as much time inside as we would have liked. The air inside is terrible (understandably) and the damp has caused the parquet floors inside much of the building to bow upwards, making an interesting effect! We started shooting inside the main hall at around 6am and spent some time chilling here and getting photos as the sun came up, but we only had till 8am on the car park. The street was already very busy down below by 6am and the main hall had a hue of red from some of the shops signage. When it did become time to leave, we had to jump into a street full of commuters. We were not getting out without being seen. It was 7:45am and the bus stops had queues of people at them. As I was leaving I did attempt to not be seen, but a middle aged chap turned round and looked right at me. I wished him a good morning, jumped down and walked off to get my externals. He certainly looked slightly bewildered. The cinema come Methodists Church is located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was constructed in 1916; designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The site has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was originally operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and was soon playing religious films. By 1926, Kings Hall was operating as a regular cinema; but was however still managed by the Methodist church. The Cinema was closed in 1937. It then converted back to its original Methodist Church use, and today is the King’s Hall Methodist Church. Some interesting and otherwise controversial quotes taken from comments when closure was announced. The church vacated the site in 2012. More Info at: http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/31352 #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 #10 #11 #12 #13 #14 #15 More At: https://www.flickr.com/photos/landie_man/albums/72157688232708403
  9. A very early start for this one. And thanks for my invite from the other 2 lads I went with @GK-WAX and @albinojay arrived here in the pitch black early hours. Luckily we didn’t have any trouble finding our way inside. We’re we found ourselves a room to wait for it to come light enough to have a look around. Watching the bustop across the road. That’s one seriously busy bustop. And another 2 guys turned up giving us a surprise we exchanged a few word and we all carried on. Here’s a few photos and history.. HISTORY Located in Southall, Middlesex, in the west of Greater London. The King’s Hall was built in 1916 and was designed by architect Sir Alfred Gelder of Hull. The King’s Hall building has a 3-storey red brick and stone facade. It was operated by the Uxbridge and Southall Wesleyan Mission and it was soon screening religious films. By 1926, it was operating as a regular cinema, still managed by the Methodist church. The King’s Hall Cinema was closed in 1937. It then reverted back to a Methodist Church use as the King’s Hall Methodist Church. They vacated the building in January 2013" 6C566847-A7B2-4B03-8B35-21A83B59D5DD by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 11C63D3A-09F5-4CAF-B8DC-2D9DBAE3A34F by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DF9E3CFA-46FB-4F59-8E89-05044F4D4E0D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 291685A1-C7A5-4C05-AE0D-EAA5E9E3BE3D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr A942D367-319B-4051-9965-CBC9BE782D97 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr B6451F47-AED7-46C9-BC1F-FBB8716DC866 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr EFEFBB87-D905-4675-B792-572677174349 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 4FF422D0-9457-4DBB-A0FD-B3A59E0105DA by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 6388F9DD-1E6B-43E1-B475-C54D7702ADD7 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 8F93F594-6E02-49A8-90EE-77146630400A by Lavino lavino, on Flickr F0EA6489-742D-4A55-B053-E9407A809A35 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr D6912FEB-7A41-4075-BF3F-18CC92A71332 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 82C5654A-58D8-4F3D-ABA7-6FFA3CE99615 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr EF6C4F61-3E43-4EA3-99E3-79E7A4CD7986 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 7E8CA3B9-870B-4597-BE8C-822A743FA4B8 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 05FFBC9B-A065-4D18-ADAA-AC06F324A28C by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 596A95BD-32DA-4213-9C8E-06061841A60B by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 732BCB12-D01B-4F4E-9ADF-B1C86B4F2D95 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 0CCE03D2-1009-4B27-BF40-1FC90159D5C5 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 170B80EE-4ADD-4D0C-9AEE-076DA9AA07D3 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 31BAC71F-DB78-462D-ABC1-08C4DAB3AC19 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 31BAC71F-DB78-462D-ABC1-08C4DAB3AC19 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 2A00922B-01E0-4236-9129-02F812E7E710 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr DF19BB97-1E29-4ECC-8B17-A1A4B30B7C95 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr E4354E42-97FB-4BA5-BC76-2304A4DF14CC by Lavino lavino, on Flickr D3A585BC-9EA7-4A96-A87E-58351FCC62B2 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr C88FDA25-E4EC-4269-9D64-A91725F507F2 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 9A4FC978-0A5C-43D3-A340-BF4ABF5EC679 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 6FED0FA9-4A21-4C0B-ABB0-1D6C5EB0721D by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 5056F5C5-4624-400D-BF20-7ECF2C724B3E by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 0D7DEB4E-2C2C-4A67-82C6-A80B4153E5DF by Lavino lavino, on Flickr E3A4C8B4-8A02-4816-85BF-51EED2EDFEFD by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 18858080-1428-48B5-8F3F-2416CDCDF481 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr 2FA9A65E-7F5B-4BE6-A4E8-2418BAABEB71 by Lavino lavino, on Flickr
  10. This place really should have been looked at a long time ago, the history behind the place is literally insane. Thanks to zombizza for putting the lead up, it was still just about worth a look inside although practically everything has been stripped already. I went inside with workers present which made it a fairly tense explore, lots of patiently hiding around corners and sneaking around expecting to get seen at any moment, eventually that moment came and I had to scarper quick sharp. I decided to go back at night and finish off seeing the place assuming there would be nobody present. Surprisingly this turned out to be an impossible mission due to previously unlocked doors being locked and an annoyingly active pair of torch waving security guards with way too much energy. During the day was better. Onto the lengthy history, take a deep breath, there's a lot to read if you can be arsed. Originally known as the Middlesex County Asylum, this was the first pauper lunatic asylum built in England following the Madhouse Act of 1828, which allowed the building of purpose-built asylums. It went on to become the largest asylum in the world at it's peak. When it opened in 1831 the Asylum accommodated up to only 300 patients. The building was enlarged in November of the same year and by 1841 90 staff were looking after 1302 patients. Extensions were added in 1879 and by 1888 there were 1891 patients and the Asylum had become the largest in Europe. Patients were looked after by members of their own sex and there were two gatehouses at the entrance - one for males and one for females. It achieved great prominence in the field of psychiatric care because of two people, Dr William Ellis and Dr John Connolly. Dr (later Sir) William Ellis encouraged patients to use their skills and trades in the Asylum. This 'therapy of employment' benefitted both the Asylum and the patients themselves and was a precursor to occupational therapy. Dr John Conolly became Medical Superintendent in 1839. He abolished mechanical restraints to control patients. This was a great success and encouraged other asylums also to do so. Padded cells, solitary confinement and sedatives were used instead. The extensive grounds were cultivated for produce. The Asylum became self-sufficient, with a farm, a laundry, a bakery and a brewery. Local artisans - tailors, shoemakers - worked at the asylum. There was a gasworks and a fire brigade and even a burial ground for those patients whose relatives had not claimed their bodies. Water was taken from the nearby Grand Union Canal and the Asylum had its own dock for barges delivering coal and for taking away produce for sale. Several name changes took place over the years. In 1889 the Asylum was renamed the London County Asylum, Hanwell. In 1918 it became known as the London County Mental Hospital. In 1929 it was renamed Hanwell Mental Hospital. In 1937 its name changed again, to St Bernard's Hospital, Southall. During WW2 the Emergency Medical Services commandeered one ward for war casualties. The Hospital and grounds received some bomb damage and later the laundry was destroyed by a V1 flying bomb, which caused many casualties. A gatehouse was also damaged. It joined the NHS in 1948 as part of the North West Metropolitan Region, with its own Hospital Management Committee. By the 1960s the Hospital in its 74 acre site held 2200 patients. St Bernard's Hospital was merged with the adjacent Ealing Hospital in 1980 and became the Psychiatric Unit. It was then known as the St Bernard's Wing of the Ealing Hospital. By this time it had 950 beds for psychiatric and psychogeriatric patients. In 1992 the Ealing Hospital General Unit and Maternity Unit split off to form a new Trust and the St Bernard's Wing regained its previous name of St Bernard's Hospital. The Hospital underwent a major refurbishment in 1998. The exterior of the buildings still in use were cleaned, revealing the yellow colouring of the bricks. Scenes from Porridge were filmed in the courtyard here and also scenes from the 1989 Batman movie with Jack Nicholson. Much of the site has been demolished already, and other parts converted into flats. The current hospital has decided that the asylum buildings can no longer be refurbished in such a way as to support a modern hospital so the remainder of the asylum buildings are being refurbished for private housing. The extensive modern buildings at the back (canal-side) of the hospital will remain in use and will be supplemented by further new buildings away from the historical asylum. I didn't know it at the time but the screws on my wide angle were completely loose so the majority of my shots were out of focus unfortunately. These are the shots that came out good enough. 1. How the exterior of all the buildings looked.... 2. 3. I spotted this stuck onto the skirting board in a corridor, I assume this was the adolescents ward... 4. Most rooms had cartoon characters painted on the walls in here 5. 6. 7. Not sure what this old hall might have been used for 8. 9. At this point the place became a little more interesting, this was the busiest area of work so I didn't hang about long 10. 11. 12. 13. The last few shots were all taken on the top floor 14. The ceiling in here was one of the only remaining features left 15. 16. 17. 18. EDIT: July 2017 revisit .... 19. Chapel and Hall, the only two buildings that haven't been converted yet. The chapel was locked and appears to be in use as a site office. 20. Large backstage area behind the hall, difficult to capture the size of it due to the scaffolding and temporary flooring above. 21. Some glimpses of former grandeur with these columns. 22. 23. Temporary flooring below the ceiling 24. 25. 26. The Hall, amazingly still untouched despite the remainder of the buildings being completely stripped or converted. 27. 28. 29. 30. Thanks for looking
  11. History Lombard Street is reputed to be one of London’s streets that is steeped in seven hundred years of banking history. It began life in the Roman times of Londinium as a wealthy city road. It later became a notable banking street on account of several Jewish goldsmith occupants sometime during the Norman conquest. However, the street did not acquire its name until Italian goldsmiths, the Longobards from Lombardy, were granted the land during the reign of Edward I. The badge of the Medici family, the three golden pills, was first displayed here, and since then it has remained as a traditional sign of the pawnbroker. It is reported that most of the large present day UK banks share history with Lombard Street. For instance, Lloyd’s of London, an insurance market now located in London’s primary financial district, began as Lloyds coffee House in 1691. From around this time, most banks established their headquarters on Lombard Street. Many remained there right up until the 1980s; the decade that signalled the end of ‘runners’ donning top hats to deliver bills of exchange to the Bank of England. Number 60., which is the rooftop this report is based on, was occupied by T.S.B for many years and it was the last bank to move its headquarters out of the street. T.S.B have assured people that their legacy will continue to be an important part of the street and that their colourful sign hanging from the front façade will be a tribute to this. On the topic of signage, Lombard Street is said to be famous for being one of the few places in London where 17th and 18th century-styled shop signs still survive, jutting from buildings on wrought-iron brackets. However, it is said that some lateral thinking is required to decipher what the old signs signify: Adam and Eve meant fruiterer; a bugle’s horn, a post office; a unicorn, an apothecary’s; a spotted cat, a perfumer’s. Many of those that remain today were the emblems of rich families and Edwardian reconstructions of early goldsmiths’ signs. It is well-known that many early 20th century banks, such as Barclays with their eagle and Lloyds with their horse, re-appropriated some of these signs as company logos. It is important to note, though, that they all chose to adopt lifeless signs as their logos, as opposed to ‘breathing signs’ (cats in baskets, rats and parrots in cages, vultures tethered to wine shacks etc.), which were very fashionable at one time. Finally, another interesting fact about Lombard Street, but one that is completely unrelated to banking, is that it is where the first love of Charles Dickens lived. The girl’s name was Maria Beadnell, and she was the daughter of a bank manager. It is said that Dickens would often walk down Lombard Street in the early hours of the morning to gaze upon the place where she slept. By today’s standard that certainly would not be considered a romantic gesture – Dickens may well have landed himself in a spot of bother if he tried peeping through girl’s windows in this day and age. Our Version of Events Despite havinghigh aspirations for the night,all of them failed. So, we were heading back to the car to call it a night when we noticed some scaffolding thatlooked ‘a bit bait’ as the locals might put it. It involved a bit of a climbing and there was no way of avoiding any onlookers from seeing us. But, since we were very desperate for a rooftop at this point, we decided to have a crack at it anyway. In the end, and contrary to all appearances, getting onto the roof of 60 Lombard Street was easy, and it wasn’t long before we were ascending the last bit of scaff to get up to the highest point on the roof. One by one we gathered in a small sheltered space, waiting for everyone to catch up before we climbed the last ladder that took us up to the highest point. But, it was at that moment we noticed that there were suddenly a lot more people around than what we’d first started out with. As it turned out, another couple of lads had decided to have a crack at the bank rooftop too. It seemed that they were just as surprised to discover us lurking about up there. At first we had thought it might some over-zealous security guards on the verge of losing their jobs if they didn’t catch us, but thankfully we were wrong. Fortunately, there was enough space up top for all of us to congregate. Since it was pretty chilly, though, we wasted no time setting up the cameras to grab a few shots. As always, the views of London were spectacular. Sadly, however, all the buildings we had wanted to get on top of were the ones surrounding us, taunting us from every direction – and they looked even more enticing from where we were standing. Explored with Ford Mayhem, Slayaaaa and Stewie. 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7:
  12. History: Doughty House is a large house on Richmond Hill in Surrey, England, built in the 18th century, with later additions. It has fine views down over the Thames, and both the house and gallery are Grade II listed buildings. The house was named after Elizabeth Doughty, who lived there from about 1786, and built St Elizabeth of Portugal Church in The Vineyard, Richmond. It was the residence of the Cook baronets from when it was bought in 1849 by the first baronet until after World War II. A 125-foot-long-gallery (38 m) was added in 1885 for the very important family art collection. The house was damaged by bombing in the Second World War and the 4th baronet moved to Jersey with 30 paintings from the collection. In 2012 the house was on the market with an asking price of £15,000,000. Future: C18 house with C19 alterations made by the Cook family. Planning Permission and Listed Building Consent have been granted to retain the main property as a single dwelling and to convert the gallery to ancillary accommodation, along with re-instating Doughty Cottage as the link between the house and gallery. The explore: So we spent basically all day in traffic jams to get there and back... The explore itself was surprisingly easy too; I must admit, that from what I have seen of it, I was expecting the place to be a little bigger than it was, but I guess thats the art of the wide angle lens! Anyway, great explore, would definitely revisit providing there are no traffic issues!
  13. Hi everybody, I'm a kiwi who has just arrived in London (via China, Mongolia, Central Asia etc) and just wanted to say hi! Have followed the posts on the facebook page but wanted to reach out to any fellow explorers in the London area who may be keen to get together and share stories, drinks or adventures! I am a reasonably amateur urbexer, my favourites sites I have visited have been Barenquell in Berlin, a colonial era police station in Phnom Penh, and an old Pepsi factory in Battambang, Cambodia (now demolished ). Not sure what is about in this huge metropolitan (other than Battersea) but I am keen to find out! Thanks and see you around!
  14. How to post a report using Flickr Flickr seems to change every time the wind changes direction so here's a quick guide on how to use it to post a report... Step 1 - Explore and take pictures Step 2 - Upload your chosen pictures to Flickr like this.. Step 3 - Once your images are successfully uploaded to flickr choose a category for the location that you have visited... Step 4 - Then "Start New Topic".. You will then see this screen... Step 5 - Now you are ready to add the image "links", known as "BBcodes", which allow your images to display correctly on forums.. Step 6 - Then click "select" followed by "view on photo page".. Now select "Share" shown below.. Step 7-13 - You will then see this screen... Just repeat those steps for each image until you're happy with your report and click "submit topic"! You can edit your report for 24 hours after posting to correct errors. If you notice a mistake outside of this window contact a moderator and they will happily rectify the problem for you
  15. A site that needs little introduction Battersea A Power Station was built in the 1930s, with Battersea B Power Station to the east in the 1950s. The two stations were built to an identical design, providing the long-recognized four-chimney layout. The station ceased generating electricity in 1983, but over the past 50 years it has become one of the best known landmarks in London and is Grade II listed. I never saw myself coming back here but when a couple of friends travelling from afar got in contact I decided I wouldn't mind checking out the current state of play, @extreme_ironing and @shaddam came along for the ride too. We got around the whole site and didn't see a soul all night, security here seems to be on the ball one minute and completely useless the next. After recent events with another group getting caught and finding themselves in a shitty situation I would recommend using caution here though. They seem to treat this site like it's on holy ground when they catch people but the truth of the matter is it's no different to being on any other site legally. It's just that security are bigger assholes than usual and I have a message for them. Fuck you asshole security, I've been on your site four times now you dumb twats and I intend to come back for more 1. Control Room A 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Maze of scaffolding 7. Switch Room B 8. 9. An area that was previously unaccessible before the scaffolding went up. 10. This allowed us to access Control Room B, completely empty now but this was once full of dials and switches with a control panel 11. It faced towards the turbine hall in this direction 12. Some old pipes tucked away on B side 13. An old painting still preserved in the turbine hall 14. Fake security on the roof 15. Looking down from the base of one of the chimneys 16. Morning mist blowing past as we bid farewell Thanks for looking
  16. Went with SK, Miss_anthrope and one non member Everyone knows the history but a quick copy and paste from Battersea.org The proposal to site a large power station on the south bank of the River Thames at Battersea in 1927 caused a storm of protest that raged for years. Questions were raised in Parliament about pollution which might harm the paintings in the nearby Tate Gallery and the parks and "noble buildings of London". Now Battersea Power Station is one of the best loved landmarks after serving London with electricity for 50 years. In the UK during the 1920s electricity was supplied by numerous private companies who built small power stations for individual industries with some of the surplus power generated going to the public supply. There was a bewildering variety of incompatible systems, high cost and jealous competition between the numerous companies. This chaotic situation caused Parliament to decree that electricity generation should be a single unified system under public ownership.It was to be another 30 years before the electricity supply was nationalised. In the interim the formation of the London Power Company was a response by private owners to delay the imposition of public ownership. Set up in 1925 it took up Parliaments recommendation that electricity generation should be in fewer, larger power stations. This led directly to the building of the first super station, to produce 400,000 kilowatts, in Battersea. Sir Giles Gilbert Scott was commissioned to design the building. His other buildings include Liverpool Cathedral, Bankside Power Station, Waterloo Bridge and the classic red telephone box. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Just a mess around photo to see what it looks like and if people like it!!!!!! 10. 11. 12. thanks for looking guys hope you enjoy it
  17. Various bits of cobbled together footage from exploring metro systems in London and overseas. (The end bit at Aldwych is an in-joke). https://vimeo.com/31108510 There's stuff from New York and skyscrapers and stuff on the account, as well as a trip to North Korea. I rarely film, so not much on there.
  18. The Official sales chat - taken from the website Offering breathtaking views, first class facilities and superlative living accommodation in a location of international status, Lincoln Plaza is set to provide one of the most prestigious and sophisticated new landmarks on Canary Wharf’s iconic skyline. Soaring up to the 31st floor, Lincoln Plaza comprises two principal apartment towers - Franklin and Greenwich - together with a 12-storey international brand name 100-suite hotel which integrates with the two towers, allowing residents access to a fabulous array of lifestyle facilities. Adjacent is a 10 level ‘rotunda’ apartment building complimenting this striking new landmark against Canary Wharf’s dazzling architecture. Each apartment has been meticulously designed to create the perfect equilibrium of luxury quality and style, featuring comfort cooling, individually selected stone tiled flooring, SMEG kitchen appliances and Hansgrohe bathroom refinements. With all the exclusive facilities of a world class hotel, Lincoln Plaza is also set to deliver a comprehensive health club complete with spa, pool and fully equipped gymnasium, opulent entrance foyer with 24-hour concierge, business lounge, private cinema and four storey winter garden ‘sky lounge’ on the 22nd floor. The explore I got into the docklands area in the late evening looking to do a couple of roof top explores. After parking up at my usual car dumping spot (thanks Asda), I made my way across to the first location, which the last time I checked was completely abandoned & an easy one to say the least. Things had changed somewhat, with the site being live & from the looks of things, pretty active. The vantage point from there is somewhat mediocre from what I saw from other people’s past visits, so I decided to forget about it & moved on to the next place. The second location was pretty well guarded with cameras pointing at the most obvious entry points. The area was still pretty busy by this point, so I circled around the perimeter & took a walk over to my third potential location, Lincoln plaza. I had given this a look when I was in the area a few weeks back, & it looked pretty secure, & with lots of nosey bods about I decided against it. This time the situation was quite different! It was still quite lively, so I decided to take myself over to the dockside to take a few leisurely night shots, & more importantly kill some time. After a while I decided that I had frozen my arse off enough & decided to make a go for it. I waited until there was nobody around, then took my moment & snuck in, pausing momentarily behind the portaloo while a car zipped past. After a bit of fast pacing into the building I was at the core staircase. It soon became apparent why it was so easy to get in, because on every floor there was a shiny dome camera watching. They must have thought no one is dumb enough to proceed with all of this surveillance here, right? Wrong! I proceeded to make my way up, & getting tired of ducking my head down each time I passed one of these things I got cheeky & gave one a very sarcastic wave. I noticed soon after that there was a sound other than me moving. I stopped & listened through the central gap in the stairs, & sure enough, there was the sound of someone high tailing up the stairs after me…….obviously they didn’t take kindly to my brazened attitude! I picked up the pace & made it to the top floor, I stepped through the doorway & immediately paused. I heard the sound of either someone’s phone or radio playing music. I made a slow retreat back down to the floor below, & hid in a dark corner. I stayed there for an hour, waiting & listening to someone systematically opening the doors to each floor in search of me. I thought it was only a matter of time before I got caught, & I started to get a bit concerned as I was doing it lone wolf. But to my surprise, after a while whoever was on the lookout had buggered off & I was left to explore again. After checking the top floor once more, I concluded that whoever was camped up there wasn’t going to be moving any time soon. I admitted defeat & decided to call it a night. I felt a bit deflated, as my goal was to get to the roof & take some vista shots, which I obviously couldn’t do. So I began checking floors at random to see if there were any other vantage points to be had. I eventually came to a floor that had a door leading to a roof terrace, I immediately did a mini fist pump & thought “it’s back on!†I raced up the opposing tower core until I reached a skylight, & within about a minute I was on the roof. The views were pretty awesome, as are most high rises in London. One thing that became immediately apparent was the wind. I was totally exposed up there, & while trying my best to take long exposures I was getting absolutely battered. As a result the shots I got weren’t the best, but I think we’ve all been in that situation before! After soaking up the scenery for a good while, I decided that it was time to make a hasty retreat. I retraced my steps back to my original accent & made my way back down. To my shock there was no one around to greet me at the bottom, which was a big relief. When I stepped back into the public realm I was met by a passing couple on their way home. They looked pretty puzzled as I passed them, obviously from an outsider perspective it’s a bit weird for someone to be coming out of a building site on their own in the early hours of the morning! Let me know what you think of the shots, I’m pretty new to night photography so any CC would be appreciated. Note; the internal ones are just taken from my phone, as I wasn't really bothered about the inside tbh. Pinkman
  19. After a curry and some beers with mates I decided to go climb something on my way home, as you do. The first site was a fail so I headed for the nearest crane and ended up here. I've always wanted to get up above Leicester Square but the insane amount of police everywhere always put me off. Tonight I didn't give a shit and it was quite amusing looking down on the police totally oblivious to me above them. Raw 1 - Police - Nil.....on this occasion at least 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Thanks for looking kids
  20. If any are interested I saw this pop up on my news feed. Organised by The London Transport Museum. Charing Cross That tour will take you through parts of Charing Cross that were closed in 1999 stretching underneath Trafalgar Square. The tunnels are now used largely for filming movies and TV shows, with Daniel Craig chasing Javier Bardem around an area slyly disguised as Temple Station in Skyfall. The recent Paddington film was shot there too. Tours take place in June and July with tickets released on 17 April at £25 (£20 concessions). The second tour in Clapham South is even more exciting, as it includes a visit to the deep level shelter next to the main tunnels which was used in the Second World War during air raids. This one represents an extremely rare opportunity to get to parts of the Underground not normally open to the public. Tours take place in October with tickets released on 17 April at £30 (£25 concessions). See more here. http://londonist.com/2015/04/rare-chance-to-tour-disused-tube-tunnels-used-in-skyfall.php
  21. A few visits to various sections over the past few years and thought I may as well do something with the clips taken. It might not link as showing error in linking and to try latter
  22. Visited both these place after travelling down to London the night before the kent meetup I had always wanted to see London from the rooftops with my own eyes and it did not disappoint! much better than the rubbish views I had seen in Leeds and Sheffield! Thanks to The Raw and Extreme Ironing for showing us these 2 and thanks again to The Raw for letting us crash at his house! Cheers for looking
  23. Met up with extreme_ironing and maniac in Tooting about 8pm for some food with the intention of heading to East London to check out some cinemas. Four beers later and so much Lebanese food that we all had the meat sweats, we realised none of us could deal with going too far with so we decided to pop in here and see what's left. Although a fair bit of stuff has been stripped out and asbestos removal is in full flow we found a surprising amount of epic stuff still inside. Access is far easier than it was too which was a bonus, especially with broken ribs. We spent a couple of hours inside and there is a lot more left than shown in my photos, much better than I expected. History (shamelessly stolen from Bhg's report ): The Young’s Brewery has been a familiar local landmark for both Wandsworth residents and visitors for over 150 years. Opened in 1831, the site has contributed much to the borough’s social and historic fabric. In 1831, Charles Allen Young and his partner Anthony Fothergill Bainbridge bought the Ram Brewery site. The new partnership suffered a serious setback in 1832 when a disastrous fire destroyed most of the brewhouse, but it was quickly rebuilt and in 1835 a new beam engine was erected inside the brewery. It is thought to be the oldest working beam engine of its kind in the world still in working condition and in its original location. It and its sister engine built in 1867, provided steam power in the brewery right up until 1976. In 1883 another fire, started in the offices, caused extensive damage to part of the brewery and the Ram Inn. Both were rebuilt the following year.A number of animals were resident in the brewery, including a ram, a number of geese and about a dozen working draught horses. It is claimed that the Ram Brewery was the oldest British brewery in continuous operation. At its closure in 2006, the brewery was a mix of ancient and ultra-modern plant and horses and drays were still used for local deliveries of beer within a mile or two of the brewery. The Ram Brewery officially closed on 25th September 2006. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Brewery humour, this was quite appropriate actually 9. 10. 11. 12. These beam engines are the most historical machinery in here. One of them was built in 1835. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. Stay classy Oblivion State
  24. Massive thanks to The_Raw and ExtremeIroning for showing us this one!! Well worth the 4 hour drive from T'old Yorkshire to the big city! Explored with Raz, Jamie, Damo and Michael the night before the Kent Meet up. From what I can gather Angel Court is a 70's design high rise office block which has recently been pulled down to replace the old style concrete floors with the new alloy light weight stuff. Its situated in the middle of a construction site in the heart of the financial district (I think...) So After a 4 hour drive from Yorkshire straight from work we met Damo and Michael and first of all we tried a block of flats only to be confronted by a rather rude and aggressive resident. So down we made a quick exit and i spent the next 20 mins trying to navigate the chaos of London city centre roads for the first time. Found somewhere to park and then managed to get pretty lost and walk around 3 miles more than we should have done (Burned off my MacDonalds so thanks for that guys ) we arrived at Angel Court. At first i was convinced that 5 of us were not going to sneak into this site but alas we did, starting with Michael scaling the fence and making it a little easier for the rest. Far too many steps in here Only spent half hour or so at the top as we were pushed for time but heres what i got; Thanks for looking
  25. Visited with The_Raw, ExtremeIroning, Raz and Jamie_P Setting the scene; 5 people, 1 206, a huge squash. After exiting my clown car which was clearly not designed for more than 3 people (French so i guess i expect too much) we jumped the wall, shimmied the scaff, over a fence and we were in... or we thought we were... secca come running over while we make our hasty escape. Fast forward 3 hours and we are back, after doing another location ready for another crack. Mr secca had tried to be clever by securing the helus, but had failed to note the ladder like fence next to it... how proffessional. So over it we went and up the steps. Tiring but so worth it, I dont know which took my breath away the most, the stairs or the view. I could have stayed up there all night but alas eventually we had to leave in order to go to the Kent meet up. Heres what i got; Raz taking it all in... If you got this far, thanks for looking
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