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Found 11 results

  1. Found this place by comparing a vague YouTube video and some info I've found here and there, then confirmed with Google maps satellite. Place was pretty big, but unfortunately pretty destroyed by vandals over time. Here are some pictures I took on my scouting trip there. Will go back for more/better shots.
  2. Here's a little selection of some of the more random, less-obvious shots from 10 years of exploring asylums. One shot each from most of the ones I've visited. Thought I'd try and avoid the obvious shots a little. Aston Hall (Nottinghamshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Ward block Bangour Village (West Lothian District Asylum, opened in 1906) Main administration block Barrow (2nd Bristol Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1938) Main corridor Bethel (Charitable public asylum, opened in 1713) Day room Bethlem Royal (4th incarnation of "Bedlam" (founded in 1247), initially for private middle-class patients, opened in 1930) Admin block staircase Cane Hill (3rd Surrey County Asylum, opened in 1883) Chapel altar Carlton Hayes (Leicestershire & Rutland County Asylum, opened in 1904) Chapel Cefn Coed (Swansea Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1932) South-eastern view of ward block and water tower Colney Hatch (aka Friern, 2nd Middlesex County Asylum, later 2nd London County Asylum, opened in 1851) Admin block tower Denbigh (aka North Wales Asylum, opened in 1848) View from ward block window towards admin block clock tower Fairfield (Three Counties Asylum (for Bedfordshire, Hertfordshire & Huntingdonshire), opened in 1860) South east view of main block Fair Mile (Berkshire County Asylum, opened in 1870) South-east view of main block Fulbourn (Cambridgeshire & Ely County Asylum, opened in 1858) Main elevation (admin block in centre) Gartloch (Glasgow District Asylum, opened in 1896) View from dormitory window Glenside (Bristol Borough Asylum, opened in 1861) Chapel window Goodmayes (West Ham Borough Asylum, opened in 1901) Gallery with cell doors Hanwell (Middlesex County Asylum, later first London County Asylum, opened in 1831) Main corridor in female wing Harperbury (Middlesex Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1934) Dormitory Hartwood (Lanarkshire District Asylum, opened in 1895) Jump-proof fire escape Heckingham (former Norwich Union Workhouse, converted into 2nd Norfolk County Mental Hospital, opened in 1927) Main elevation Hellingly (East Sussex County Asylum, opened in 1903) Corridor network (with random portable bathtub) Hensol (Glamorganshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Interview room High Royds (3rd West Riding County Asylum, opened in 1888) Glazed-tile doorway Horton (8th London County Asylum, opened in 1902) Administration block The Lawn (Charitable Public Asylum, opened in 1820) View from eastern wing Lennox Castle (Dunbartonshire Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1937) Admin block coaching entrance Leybourne Grange (Kent Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1936) OT room Little Plumstead (Norfolk Mental Defective Colony, opened in 1930) Discarded training material Mapperley (Nottingham Borough Asylum, opened in 1880) Southern aspect Middlewood (2nd West Riding County Asylum, opened in 1872) Chapel Napsbury (Middlesex County Asylum, opened in 1905) Recreation hall (left) and ward block (right), with water tower in background Pen-Y-Fal (Monmouthshire County Asylum, opened in 1851) Ward blocks Pool Parc (Overspill annexe to North Wales Mental Hospital, opened in 1937) Main corridor Rauceby (Kesteven County Asylum, opened in 1902) Administration block Rosslynlee (East Lothian & Peebles District Asylum, opened in 1874) Recreation hall Runwell (East Ham & Southend-on-Sea Borough Mental Hospital, opened in 1937) Chapel Severalls (2nd Essex County Asylum, opened in 1913) Gallery with cell doors St Andrew's (Norfolk County Asylum, opened in 1814) Mortuary St Brigid's (Connaught District Asylum, opened in 1833) Ward corridor St Cadoc's (Newport Borough Asylum, opened in 1906) Window in day-room. St Clement's (Ipswich Borough Asylum, opened in 1870) "Quiet room" in medium-secure annexe St Crispin (Northamptonshire County Asylum, opened in 1876) Staircase in Superintendent's residence St David's (Joint Counties Asylum for Carmarthenshire, Pembrokeshire & Cardiganshire, opened 1865) Observation room in annexe St George's (Northumberland County Asylum, opened in 1859) Corridor network St John's (Lincolnshire County Asylum, opened in 1852) Admin block main reception St Mary's (Gateshead Borough Asylum, opened in 1914) Corridor network Stone House (The City Of London Asylum, opened in 1866) Dining hall Strathmartin (aka Balvodan) (Charitable Public Idiot Asylum, opened in 1855) Eastern side of main building Sunnyside Royal (Montrose District Asylum, opened in 1858) Congregation area outside recreation hall Talgarth (Joint Breconshire and Radnorshire County Asylum, aka Mid-Wales Asylum, opened in 1903) View from ward window The Towers (Leicester Borough Asylum, opened in 1869) Main corridor in ward section of eastern block West Park (11th London County Asylum, opened in 1915 as Canadian War Hospital, reopened in 1923 as mental hospital) Geriatric ward day room Whittingham (4th Lancashire County Asylum, opened in 1873) Entrance into ward block from corridor network
  3. Hello all, Recently realised i never did anything with my High Royds Photos. You all know the history so i wont bore you with that... Heres how it all played out; How I got a restraining order from a building... Cast your mind back to February... 2 years since the last report on High Royds and as conversion was well underway everyone thought the place was gone. Until one dark cold night when myself Raz and Ant took a mosey on over to see what was left and we were amazed to find that the admin building and a ward near the back of the site hadn't been touched. SWEET! So we waited till the weekend, and we retruned with the cameras. We spent a good few hours roaming around having a laugh until whilst stood in one of the corridoors we hear voices... and the owners of said voices come around the corner in their high vis and read us our rights. Great we've been arrested.... After a while the dickhead who had arrested us realised we weren't actually doing anything wrong and he backed off, called off the dog unit and left the decent officers to deal with us. After convincing them we were only there to take pictures, the officers took us over to the housing develpment office to speak with the lady in the showroom. As we walked in there was a couple speaking with her about buying a house, she took one look at the police, then at us filthy and clearly being detained, and they left. Ooops. With the development lady in tow, we went into the show house where we were made to apologise to the lady. She then left us alone with the cops, who wrote out restraining orders for the lot of us and then one of them walked over the brightest white carpet ive ever seen in muddy boots. "Looks like your not the only ones getting their wrists slapped today" He said looking at what he'd done. So we and the police made a quick exit before we were caught. So in one day, we were arrested, ruined a carpet, and got banned from entering the premises until Feb 2016 Photos; I apologise for some of the above photos if they make your eyes bleed... This was when i still thought HDR was cool. Sins of my youth Thanks for looking
  4. Unfortunately, this place beautiful place has been heavily vandalized short before our visit. Some idiots have thrown most of the furniture from the first floor into the main corridor... #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 A few more shots can be found here, however most of the motifs have been destroyed http://www.industriesafari.de/Viewer/ManicomioC14/index.html
  5. Visited on a very cold, early morning during a Lincolnshire road trip I went on last winter. I was so cold and tired on this particular morning that I managed to forget to put on my shoes before leaving the car, so ended up doing the whole explore in my slippers! However, it was very much worth the numb feet, and I found it hard to drag myself away from the place. This really is a stunning example of a British Victorian Asylum. History: St John’s Asylum, Lincolnshire in the East of England was built 1852. The building was then known as Lindsey & Holland Counties & Lincoln & District Lunatic Asylum. The Asylum has also been known over the years as Lincolnshire County Pauper Lunatic Asylum and Bracebridge Heath Asylum. Finally it was given the name St John’s during the early 1960’s It was originally built to house just 250 patients but by 1902 the asylum grounds covered 120 acres. The grounds of the asylum were cultivated by the inmates where they grew their own vegetables. Within the grounds was a cemetery for the hospital which covered 1.5 acres. St John’s also had its own mortuary chapel. After the outbreak of World War II during 1940, the patients were transferred to other nearby establishments as the hospital was turned into an emergency hospital. In 1948 the administration of the hospital was passed to the National Health Service The asylum finally closed its doors during December 1989 with all the patients being transferred to other nearby hospitals. The site was then sold to developers who have converted a lot of the site into new housing. All that now remains is the main asylum buildings which are Grade II listed, keeping them safe from demolition. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30.
  6. I visited this place last year when I was trying to see as many asylums as possible before they were knocked down or converted. I must have got to this one just in time, as last time I visited there were people living in it. It was nice to see the building being put to good use and the development company did a lovely job of the conversion with minimal demolition. History: Stone House Hospital, formerly the City of London Lunatic Asylum, was a hospital and former mental illness treatment facility in Stone, near Dartford, Kent, in the United Kingdom. As of November 2007, the hospital has been closed, and its has been redeveloped into luxury flats. Stone House was originally constructed between 1862 and 1866 at the behest of the London Commissioners in Lunacy to provide for pauper lunatics from the London area at a cost of £65,000. The buildings were designed in a Tudor Revival architecture style by James Bunstone Bunning, and the facility accommodated 220 patients. The asylum grounds, at first 33 acres (130,000 m2) and later expanded to 140 acres (0.57 km2), included a working farm. Additions to the original buildings were made in 1874, 1878, and 1885, including an expanded female wing and a separate hospital building for patients with infectious diseases. After 1892, the asylum was able to take "private" patients (patients whose fees were paid by their families, or from pensions). The influx of private patients resulted in a budget surplus, and enabled expansion and improvements of the asylum's facilities. In 1924 the facility was renamed the City of London Mental Hospital, and in 1948 it was taken over by the new National Health Service and became known as Stone House Hospital. A 1998 assessment by Thames Healthcare suggested that the hospital was not suited for modern healthcare; plans for the hospital's closure were initiated in 2003 by West Kent NHS.
  7. The Lancaster County Lunatic Asylum Lancaster Moor Hospital (formerly known as The County Lunatic Asylum). During the nineteenth century Lancaster became a provincial centre for the treatment of mental illness. In 1809 it was decided that the proposed County Lunatic Asylum would be built at Lancaster; a recognition of Lancaster’s status as the county town. Lancaster Moor Hospital was Lancashire’s first County Lunatic Asylum. The decision to build it was taken in 1809, one year after the permissive County Asylums Act, 1808. The hospital opened in 1816 as the ‘County Lunatic Asylum for the County Palatine of Lancaster’. It was only the fourth asylum to be built under the terms of the Act in the country. It was extended in 1824 and 1883, and by 1891 it accommodated 1833 patients. In that year its administration was transferred to the newLancashire Asylums Board of Lancashire County Council. Additional buildings, known as Ridge Lea, on the ‘villa’ principle were added in 1907, 1909, 1912, 1916 and 1938. These buildings were chiefly to accommodate private patients. 1. 2. 3. 4. The Asylum is a stately quadrangular building of stone, with a handsome front, relieved by pillars of the Doric order, and at one time could hold up to 3,200 patients. The annexe completed in 1882 at a cost of £125,000, occupies a site comprising an area of about 41 acres. The buildings are constructed of stone; in the centre of the block over the main entrance is a clock tower about 100 feet in height, and there are smaller ones at the front extremity of each wing. The main part has been listed as Grade II and the whole building itself is in excellent condition. The owners English Partnerships are currently deciding on what to do with the building. But beneath the veneer of these simple facts and statistics lies anther story of Lancashire’s first County Lunatic Asylum which is as dark as its blackened exterior. Large Victorian public asylums haunt the history of psychiatry. They were once hailed as places of refuge for some of society’s supposedly most vulnerable men and women but they soon earned a reputation as dehumanising, prison-like institutions. It’s impossible to say what treatments and restraints were used at the Lancaster County Lunatic Asylum as secrecy and discretion was pervasive and surviving records were very selective and changed over time. Rumours and hearsay about leg-irons and manacles being used and patients sleeping in their own excrement on straw were rife. 5. 6. 7. 8. We do know patients lived within the confines of the hospital and privacy was minimal. Wards were able to house up to 50 patients, in very close proximity and with little personal space. The daily regime was strictly regimented, with little room for variation and often under the watchful eye of staff. During the early years of the Asylums, wards were locked and security was kept high. Angry, violent or suicidal patients were housed within the wards, and often locked within a padded cell. Treatments included drugs, Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) and Lobotomies. It goes without saying that some regimes were better than others and I offer no evidence that Lancaster was better or worse than other Asylums. But I have found an articulate voice that has described visiting his mother in Lancaster Moor Hospital and it makes harrowing reading. In A Life Like Other People’s the famous playwright and author Alan Bennett relates the story of when his father committed his mother to the Hospital in 1966 and then both visit her a few hours later. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. …We flung open the door on Bedlam, a scene of unimagined wretchedness. What hit you first was the noise. The hospitals I had been in previously were calm and unhurried; voices were hushed; sickness, during visiting hours at least, went hand in hand with decorum. Not here. Crammed with wild and distracted women, lying or lurching about in all the wanton disarray of a Hogarth print, it was a place of terrible tumult. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. Some of the grey-gowned wild-eyed creatures were weeping, others shouting, while one demented wretch shrieked at short and regular intervals like some tropical bird. Almost worse was a big dull-eyed woman who sat bolt upright on her bed, oblivious to the surrounding tumult, as silent and unmoving as a stone deity. 19. Obviously, I thought, we have strayed into the wrong ward, much as Elizabeth Taylor did in the film ofSuddenly Last Summer. Mam was not ill like this. She had nothing to do with the distracted creature who sat by the nearest bed, her gown hitched high above her knees, banging her spoon on a tray. But as I turned to go, I saw that Dad was walking on down the ward. 20. We had left Mam at the hospital that morning looking, even after weeks of illness, not much different from her usual self: weeping and distraught, it’s true, but still plump and pretty, clutching her everlasting handbag and still somehow managing to face the world. As I followed my father down the ward, I wondered why we were bothering: there was no such person here. 21. 22. He stopped at the bed of a sad, shrunken woman with wild hair, who cringed back against the pillows. ‘Here’s your Mam,’ he said. This was in 1966… big thanks to camera shy for letting me jump on board the trip that was originally a two man permission visit
  8. The North Wales Lunatic Asylum was the first psychiatric institution built in Wales; construction began in 1844 and completed in 1848 in the town of Denbigh. The roof has been made safe supposedly to prevent further weather damage.After exploring it,the wife told me she still preferred Talgarth!!No pleasing em eh! We start at the top with the Chapel Inside From the Chapel we look round the Isolation Hospital Bit of peeling paint Body Fridge Morgue We are now in the rear of the Hospital,in Laundry Laundry Lush corridor Total floor collapse On the ward near the Clinic Interconnecting corridors leading to Admin On our way to Admin Gorgeous brickwork Top floor of Admin now..very dodgy Kitchens Dining Area Ground Floor of the West wing I have seen old pics of this place crammed with beds West side of Admin Near the revolving door And now Admin..we left this till last in case a certain bloke nabbed us..by then we had seen/done what we wanted But we saw no one except other explorers Well,that was a short walk round Debigh..we actually saw much much more,but am sure you get the picture, Many thanks for looking..
  9. Stone House Hospital, formerly the City of London Lunatic Asylum, was a hospital and former mental illness treatment facility in Stone, near Dartford, Kent, in the United Kingdom. As of November, 2007 the hospital has been closed, and bids have been taken for its redevelopment to house luxury flats. Stone House was originally constructed between 1862 and 1866 at the behest of the London Commissioners in Lunacy to provide for pauper lunatics from the London area at a cost of £65,000 The buildings were designed in a Tudor Revival architecture style by James Bunstone Bunning, and the facility accommodated 220 patients. The asylum grounds, at first 33 acres (130,000 m2) and later expanded to 140 acres (0.57 km2), included a working farm. Additions to the original buildings were made in 1874, 1878, and 1885, including an expanded female wing and a separate hospital building for patients with infectious diseases. The first medical superintendent of the Asylum was Dr. Octavius Jepson, who served from the opening of the facility through 1887; on his death twelve years later, he was buried in the asylum's cemetery. He was succeeded by Dr. Ernest White, who served until his retirement in 1904. The third superintendent was Dr. Robert Hunter Steen, who was in turn succeeded in 1924 by Dr. William Robinson. Robinson retired in 1942, but due to wartime staff shortages his permanent replacement, Dr. Hardwick, was not appointed until 1946; on the takeover by NHS his new title became Physician Superintendent, which brought additional powers and responsibilities. He was succeeded upon his retirement in 1959 by Dr. Cates (1959–1963), who was the last to hold the title, as the NHS decided to delegate day-to-day operations to a chief Consulting Psychiatrist. After 1892, the asylum was able to take "private" patients (patients whose fees were paid by their families, or from pensions). The influx of private patients resulted in a budget surplus, and enabled expansion and improvements of the asylum's facilities. In 1924 the facility was renamed the City of London Mental Hospital, and in 1948 it was taken over by the new National Health Service and became known as Stone House Hospital. A 1998 assessment by Thames Healthcare suggested that the hospital was not suited for modern healthcare; plans for the hospital's closure were initiated in 2003 by West Kent NHS. Among its most famous patients was the poet and composer Ivor Gurney, who resided there from 1922 until his death in 1937. , ,
  10. Stone House Hospital, formerly the City of London Lunatic Asylum, was a hospital and former mental illness treatment facility in Stone, near Dartford, Kent Stone House was originally constructed at a cost of £65,000 between 1862 and 1866 at the behest of the London Commissioners in Lunacy to provide for pauper lunatics from the London The buildings were designed in a Tudor Revival architecture style by James Bunstone Bunning, and the facility accommodated 220 patients. The asylum grounds, at first 33 acres and later expanded to 140 acres included a working farm. After 1892, the asylum was able to take "private" patients (patients whose fees were paid by their families, or from pensions). The influx of private patients resulted in a budget surplus, and enabled expansion and improvements of the asylum's facilities. In 1924 the facility was renamed the City of London Mental Hospital, and in 1948 it was taken over by the new National Health Service and became known as Stone House Hospital. A 1998 assessment by Thames Healthcare suggested that the hospital was not suited for modern healthcare; plans for the hospital's closure were initiated in 2003 by West Kent NHS. Among its most famous patients was the poet and composer Ivor Gurney, who resided there from 1922 until his death in 1937. Closed in November 2007 and currently being redeveloped into luxury Houses/Flats Thanks for taking the time
  11. History has been done and done again, There is a security guard and Alsation on site 24/7, well we saw the big pootch but no guard !......bugger it go for the pics, no way in grrrrr but we did manage to get some out side shots..... it's a real shame there is only the clock tower left and a very small amount of buildings left ... sorry but dog with big pointy teeth always wins...time to run !!!!!!!!!!!!!!.....
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